Jump to Navigation

Hand Tool Headlines

The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

An aggregate of many different woodworking blog feeds from across the 'net all in one place!  These are my favorite blogs that I read everyday...

Headlines

No Tools to Lend

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 11:00pm

habs_planes

No Tools to Lend

These words, inscribed on the door of a farmer’s tool house, recently caught our eye, and furnished a ready theme for meditation. Borrowing is an ancient and evil custom, the fruitful source of many troubles. In the ruder stages of civilization there might have been greater necessity for borrowing than now; but as the world progresses there can be less and less need of it.

The tendency of cultivated humanity is to independent action—the tendency of barbarism is to a servile obligation. The more educated a community, the less they borrow, and consequently the more the borrowing element predominates, the greater their degradation.

There are several kinds of borrowers at the present day. There are the careful and the careless—the slack and the prompt —those who expect to pay for the privilege, and those who don’t expect to—those who help themselves without permission, and those who forget to return.

The careful, prompt, paying borrower is usually a welcome visitor. It is a pleasure to lend to such a man. This class know how to appreciate a favor, and it is of these that Solomon spoke when he said “the borrower is servant to the lender.”

But there is a class to whom the lender is servant, a degenerate class of borrowers, always to be dreaded. They wear a fair, smooth face to begin with, and a mean, sneaking face at the end. They take the precious property of another, and subject it to rougher usage and severer strain than does the owner. The chances are that the article is returned in a broken or damaged condition.

A man who can misuse a borrowed thing, seldom has delicacy enough to make amends for an injury. Thus insult is added to injury, and if complaint arises, neighbors often become enemies. That such are the frequent, final results of borrowing, any one familiar with social life knows.

At that farm house where the inscription above referred to was limned, there may have been peculiar reasons for it. Of these reasons we know nothing, and have no desire to. But our sympathies, quickened by trials in this lending line, have led us to recall cases that may have been real.

For example, farmer A keeps all sorts of tools neat, bright, and in perfect order. He prides himself on having tools, and sacrifices other pleasures to save money to buy and pay for them. He has neighbors who are unable or too stingy to buy, and so they live by borrowing, and making old apologies for tools answer instead. They can appreciate good tools, and are willing to save time in using them as well as anybody, but they never think about the propriety of remuneration.

Farmer A buys a new corn planter, and the season being backward, several neighbors are behind hand in planting, and apply for the use of the machine. The implement cost money: the owner never expecting to buy another, handles it himself carefully, and reluctantly loans it.

Some day after, when farmer A wants to use his machine, he has to hunt it up among his neighbors, and finds it dirty, unhoused, a nut lost off, and a wooden linchpin supplying the place of the appropriate iron one. As it has been used by several individuals, each throws the blame of damage upon the other, coolly leaving the owner to pocket the loss and its injury.

Again, farmer A gets a mowing machine, and puts it in running order some rainy day before the time of using. Soon after a neighboring farmer comes all prepared with his team, and wants to try it in his home lot, intimating that he thinks of buying when he can decide upon its merits.

The machine is allowed to depart, and finally returned by the borrower without thanks or offering, but with the cool impudence that it wouldn’t do its work. On examination the knives are found gapped and marked by the sticks and bricks through which it has run, and the loss of an important screw is a key to the mystery.

Other cases might be enumerated. Suffice it to say there are well off farmers in almost every town, who for years have depended upon less opulent neighbors for plows, rakes, forks, and grindstones. These things ought not to be. Every tub should stand or fall upon its own bottom.

It is neither charity or religion to lend to rich men without remuneration. A man’s tools are property, and like money are entitled to security and pay. We believe more and more in the sage advice to young men that Shakespeare put into the mouth of Polonius in the play of Hamlet:—

“Neither a borrower nor a lender be,
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.”

The Country Gentleman – July 11, 1861

habs_planes_2

The Lender is Servant to the Borrower.

Will you permit an old fellow who has seen some service in farming, and who has been a subscriber to your very useful paper since its first publication, to occupy a few lines in the Cabinet, for a purpose that perhaps some may consider of little importance.

The purpose indicated by the heading, to wit:—Borrowing, in many neighborhoods, and amongst considerate thoughtful farmers is not much practised; yet there are individuals who through downright carelessness and neglect of duty to themselves and their more provident neighbors, are much given to this species of imposition.

A proper spirit of accommodation, and a disposition to oblige and reasonably to promote the interests of neighbors, should always be encouraged and promoted, but it should never be carried to the point where it would assume the character of a regular systematic plan of operations.

Those who borrow, should resort to it as seldom as possible, and always return the article borrowed as early as practicable, and be sure that it is returned to its owner in good order. This is but a very plain principle of common sense and justice, and yet there are very frequent instances of its infringement, and that among well meaning, yet inconsiderate people.

On the farm that I was reared, care was taken to keep the implements of agriculture in good order, and to have a proper supply of them, but we had neighbors in good circumstances who instead of depending on their own resources, were constantly borrowing, first one article and then another, the year round, and it was somewhat of a rarity for them to send any thing home again; for they seemed to think it trouble enough to come for it in the first instance.

During my boy-hood, it fell to my lot when a loaned article was wanted to trudge off to the neighbor who had borrowed it and bring it home, and it was not unfrequent that it was unfit for use when brought home, and sometimes there was demur at the surrender of a borrowed article.

Now I hope there has been improvement in these matters since I was errand-boy, yet I fear there is still room for admonition on the subject of borrowing, and I concluded to drop you these few lines, that the boys of the present day, may know what has been the experience of those who were boys fifty years ago but are now
                                                                                                                 OLD MEN.

The Farmers’ Cabinet – April 13, 1838

—Jeff Burks


Filed under: Historical Images
Categories: Hand Tools

Welcome to the New Alaska Woodworker Blog

The Alaska Woodworker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 8:34pm
When I started the Alaska Woodworker blog back in November 2012, I wasn’t sure if I was going to enjoy blogging or if anyone would actually enjoy reading my blathering.   Well after 16 months, 109 posts, 95 followers, and almost 42,000 views from 100 countries, I find that I enjoy sharing my woodworking adventures, […]
Categories: Hand Tools

Barrel Revival

She Works Wood - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 6:47pm
Look what followed us home from the outdoor market to day.  I love, love, love supporting my local woodworkers and I really get jazzed when I can support a young who is just starting out and doing something cool/creative. Keith Forsyth over at Barrel Revival made this chair from old oak barrels staves used in […]
Categories: General Woodworking

what a weekend it was…

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:41pm

Winter is perhaps really over here – it better be, I put my hat & scarves away.  

The day started out in the woods, looking for birds. Daniel & I saw many, he counted 18 species; but we only got a few shots of them. 

 

wood ducks

wood ducks

 

bluebird

bluebird

 

turkey

they don’t call this a turkey for nothing

Back home we ended up with spoon carving lesson # something-0r-other. I have to teach a bunch of students at Lie-Nielsen next month, so started practicing with Daniel. His knife work is excellent, given his strength.  (the May class is full, so we added one as soon as we could – which means October! here’s the link 

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/weekend-workshop/1-ww-pf-sc14

 

 

DF grip 1

 

DF grip 2

 

Working one-on-one meant I got some carving in too. 

pair of spoon carvers

 

Meanwhile Rose did the 19th-century-Swedish-immigrant-in-the-garden routine. All around a busy day here. 

rose as immigrant gardner

 

When one of the household  is a knitter and the other is a basket-maker, that means knitting baskets. I don’t get to make baskets much anymore, but have several that have lingered for quite a while. I finished this one the other day.  It’s a form I have only done once before; a double-swing-handle design. Basket is ash, handles, rims, and feet are hickory. Lashing is hickory bark. 

knitting basket

inside basket

basket skids

 

Then Daniel went in the house & started a self-portrait carving his spoon. Sometimes these pictures never get done, like my baskets. So I am posting it now in case it’s an orphan drawing. 

df self portrait as carver 001

 

Now onto another subject. If you’re inclined to help support some young people doing what they love, remember Eleanor Underhill? Maybe you know her father? In addition to illustrating Roy’s most recent Woodwright book, she did some drawings for mine & Alexander’s Joint Stool book – but her main gig is music – and she’s part of a trio making “heartfelt country soul” – they’re using Kickstarter to fund their next album. I’m in. 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/underhillrose/underhill-roses-best-album-yet

 

 


Plant stand continues

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:04pm

Something extremely disappointing happened to me last week that I didn’t mention on the blog. While prepping the wood for my plant stand I discovered that a good portion of it wasn’t usable. There was some rot, and bad checks, and worst of all twist. Rather than throw it all in the trash; it’s still Walnut; I salvaged everything I could and stacked it neatly on the small rack I have in my garage. In fact, I had planned on taking a photo of it for the blog and seeing if anybody could come up with a good project for it. But with the Walnut not an option I wasn’t too sure what to do about the plant stand that my wife has been asking me to make-I really don’t want to purchase any material at the moment, and at the same time I don’t usually keep much laying around. So I did some searching in my scrap pile and found that I had enough clear Fir to make the stand legs, and bottom stretchers, and I had enough clear Pine to make the top stretchers as well as the table top itself. I still need a board for the bottom shelf, but I will worry about that when the stand is ready to be assembled.

Today saw the most progress of any other during the project. I got all 16 mortises laid out, the tenons are all sawn, and the top is finished. The tenons were the most time consuming part of the day. I used the table saw to define the cheeks of the tenons, but I sawed them with a hand saw. I’m not sure exactly why I do it this way, because there really is no advantage one way or the other, but it’s always how I’ve done it, and it seems to work. For accuracy I saw the tenons two boards at a time, which seems to help make sawing easier, and it speeds things up a little. With all sixteen tenons sawn I started on the top.

To make the top I glued up two boards, using the jointer plane to make a tight glue joint. I don’t know why, but when I did the glue up last week I had some trouble getting a good joint. The iron was certainly sharp enough, but the board did not want to plane properly. In any event, I did eventually manage to get a tight joint, and today I used the smoothing plane to clean it up. Before I went any further, I used the table saw and cross cut sled to produce the finished size: 16×16. I then planed the edges clean and used the random orbit sander, 220 grit, for a final light pass on the top.

The last operation of the day was laying out the mortises. Before I started I marked both the legs and stretchers with a cabinet makers triangle just so I didn’t screw up royally. To mark the mortises I used the tenons of the stretchers to size them, and then used a marking gauge to lay them out. Because I don’t have a mortising machine, I will chop them out with a mortising chisel. I suppose I could use a router, but on a soft wood like Fir the chisel will do just fine. So by next weekend the joinery should all be ready to go. I will only need to at the beading and the stand will be ready for assembly.

At first I was a little worried about using Pine and Fir together, but I think they will do fine. Both are softwoods and the material is nice and clear with no warp or knots of any kind. I wish I could use all Fir but I just didn’t have enough. I had even considered buying a 2×8 and milling the material from that, but that could be hit or miss, and I doubt that I could find a piece that was clear enough to make furniture from, at least not without searching through hundreds of boards to find it. I may regret that choice when I stain this project. I’m hoping that the gel stain that I used for my end tables does a good job of evening out two slightly dissimilar woods. I will have to do a test run at first, and maybe use some conditioner on the wood. If I don’t post any photos, you all will know it turned out.

marking the tenons

marking the tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Set up for sawing the cheeks

Set up for sawing the cheeks


Categories: General Woodworking

Plant stand continues

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:04pm

Something extremely disappointing happened to me last week that I didn’t mention on the blog. While prepping the wood for my plant stand I discovered that a good portion of it wasn’t usable. There was some rot, and bad checks, and worst of all twist. Rather than throw it all in the trash; it’s still Walnut; I salvaged everything I could and stacked it neatly on the small rack I have in my garage. In fact, I had planned on taking a photo of it for the blog and seeing if anybody could come up with a good project for it. But with the Walnut not an option I wasn’t too sure what to do about the plant stand that my wife has been asking me to make-I really don’t want to purchase any material at the moment, and at the same time I don’t usually keep much laying around. So I did some searching in my scrap pile and found that I had enough clear Fir to make the stand legs, and bottom stretchers, and I had enough clear Pine to make the top stretchers as well as the table top itself. I still need a board for the bottom shelf, but I will worry about that when the stand is ready to be assembled.

Today saw the most progress of any other during the project. I got all 16 mortises laid out, the tenons are all sawn, and the top is finished. The tenons were the most time consuming part of the day. I used the table saw to define the cheeks of the tenons, but I sawed them with a hand saw. I’m not sure exactly why I do it this way, because there really is no advantage one way or the other, but it’s always how I’ve done it, and it seems to work. For accuracy I saw the tenons two boards at a time, which seems to help make sawing easier, and it speeds things up a little. With all sixteen tenons sawn I started on the top.

To make the top I glued up two boards, using the jointer plane to make a tight glue joint. I don’t know why, but when I did the glue up last week I had some trouble getting a good joint. The iron was certainly sharp enough, but the board did not want to plane properly. In any event, I did eventually manage to get a tight joint, and today I used the smoothing plane to clean it up. Before I went any further, I used the table saw and cross cut sled to produce the finished size: 16×16. I then planed the edges clean and used the random orbit sander, 220 grit, for a final light pass on the top.

The last operation of the day was laying out the mortises. Before I started I marked both the legs and stretchers with a cabinet makers triangle just so I didn’t screw up royally. To mark the mortises I used the tenons of the stretchers to size them, and then used a marking gauge to lay them out. Because I don’t have a mortising machine, I will chop them out with a mortising chisel. I suppose I could use a router, but on a soft wood like Fir the chisel will do just fine. So by next weekend the joinery should all be ready to go. I will only need to at the beading and the stand will be ready for assembly.

At first I was a little worried about using Pine and Fir together, but I think they will do fine. Both are softwoods and the material is nice and clear with no warp or knots of any kind. I wish I could use all Fir but I just didn’t have enough. I had even considered buying a 2×8 and milling the material from that, but that could be hit or miss, and I doubt that I could find a piece that was clear enough to make furniture from, at least not without searching through hundreds of boards to find it. I may regret that choice when I stain this project. I’m hoping that the gel stain that I used for my end tables does a good job of evening out two slightly dissimilar woods. I will have to do a test run at first, and maybe use some conditioner on the wood. If I don’t post any photos, you all will know it turned out.

marking the tenons

marking the tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Set up for sawing the cheeks

Set up for sawing the cheeks


Categories: General Woodworking

New Smaller Smoother In Action

Caleb James Chairmaker Planemaker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 4:53pm
If you subscribe to my Youtube channel then this is old news but if you don't then I wanted to show a little video of a new smaller version of my favorite smoother in action. This little guy is so much fun.

It is about 5/16" shorter than the standard size with a 1-1/2" blade and 5-13/16" long. Oh and the iron is bedded at 57.5˚.

My thinking behind the design was to have something that excelled at clean up in an area that had lots of reversing grain which limited different directions of attack you could take. Those big planes are frustrating in these situations. Heck a No.4 is way too big much less a No. 4 1/2.

I frankly was inspired by those really amazing infill planes that Sauer & Steiner make and of course Raney's (Daed Toolworks) infills as well. Maybe that's why I decided to make it out of solid persimmon. Get some all ebony going on.

Enjoy!


Categories: Hand Tools

3 Accepted Foot-to-Case Connections

Woodworker's Edge - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 4:34pm

Last week, after I professed that everyone should have a spindle sander, A few readers asked how I used a spindle sander as a thickness sander. It turns out that I have posted that technique, but it was inside another post. Here’s a link to that post; you’ll find the spindle sander being used to thin ebony string about halfway down the post.

Entertainment_Center copyOn to the next topic: How to attach feet to your case. Of course, there are a few ways to get feet on your cases. There are three methods I generally use on most every case. The first is to attach the feet directly to the bottom of the case, a second method is to rout the top edge of the joined feet and install a plate through which screws affix the assembled unit to the case bottom and the third method is to attach feet to a frame then attach the frame to the case and use a transition molding to cover the through dovetails where the case bottom joins the sides. I mention other methods, because I’ve built a couple of chest – full-size and spice boxes – from Chester County where the feet were attached directly to stiles of the frame and panels sides. While this is not commonplace, it, along with other methods, is sometimes done.

To attach feet directly to the case, I begin by installing a molding to which the feet are glued. You wouldn’t think that you could assemble feet to a molding and that would be strong enough to hold everything for 200 years. IMG_1590Of course, you would be correct. What really holds the feet to the case are  glue blocks. These blocks also carry the bulk of the load of your chest. On the case I’m currently at work on, the thickness of the feet allows about an 1/8″ of the feet to lap onto the case itself. Then, with the glue blocks in place, the weight of the case is divided on the actual feet and on the glue blocks – the vertical block holds the weigh while the two horizontal blocks keep the assembled foot attached.

The next method is a bit more work. And the added plate makes the connection easier, but not necessarily any stronger. After the two foot pieces are joined via miters, I rout a small lip on the inside of the feet using a rabbeting router bit to which I attach a thin plate. PlateThe SketchUp drawing at the left shows how the plate fits to the feet; a thin bead of glue and brads secure the plate to the feet. The assembled unit is then screwed directly to the case bottom with the unit sticking out in front of the case. The look is completed by wrapping a molding around the case. An example of this type of connection is seen in the opening photo, although you cannot see the plate. That’s by design. As you see in the drawing, the cutout for the plate does not blow through the end of the foot.

The last method – the option that I find the most used as I look back at furniture I’ve built throughout the years – is to attach the feet to a base frame which is then attached to the case. Foot&Frame3I used this method on the Pennsylvania blanket chests in the August 2009 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine (#177) and the Serpentine chest from issue #195 (February 2012). As you can see in the right-hand photo, the same idea of glue blocks is used – mainly for reinforcement in this case. The frame is attached to the front of the chest with screws, but the remaining frame is nailed to the case bottom to allow for seasonal adjustments. The look is then completed with a transition molding.

These are three good methods used to attach feet to cases. There are pros and cons to each, as there is with any technique used in woodworking. Whenever you here, “This is the only way to do it,  run in the opposite direction. You have choices.

Build Something Great!

Glen

 


Categories: General Woodworking

Character Comes Cheap

Paul Sellers - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:32pm

If we walk on two legs and think to resolve puzzles, problems and concepts of design and we build and negotiate solutions, making and creating is intrinsic to us. Whether we will evolve into unconstructive beings remains to be seen, but I look at blocks of wood used for building walls and can’t help but shape them with my hands and a few tools to make a scoop or a spoon or a spatula.

DSC_0268

 

When I choose my tools I look at different parts of them. Usually I find myself looking at something old, something from the past, and I respect the quality hidden beneath the superficial and neglect to its inner character. I don’t really look so much for sets or even ones from the same maker now. These are not really the ones I reach for. Yes, I admit I do look at tools, a chisel, for character I don’t find in new tools. I like interesting tools I suppose. You know, the ones that have different woods and even steel blades that take and hold their edges differently too, but let me sharpen them. I had a set of chisels where the bevelled edges came to a sharp edge on the long side edge bevels. When I pressed them to the stones they felt sharp enough to cut into my fingers so I couldn’t sharpen them properly. I called the makers and told them of the safety issue and they said to sand the corners. That didn’t seem quite right to me somehow and especially as they were one of the most expensive on the market. Another maker I bought chisels from supplied chisels where the cutting edges kept fracturing when I chopped with them. Again I brought this to the attention of the makers and they did nothing about it. DSC_0270Of the 100 old chisels I have bought I never had one where the edge crumpled, fractured, didn’t take or didn’t hold a good edge. These three chisels cost £7 for the three plus shipping. They will last me about 50 years if use them throughout every day. It will take me 20 minutes each to get them how I want them. I think that’s good value for money. I buy character because it textures my life. I like texture like this. There’s a history in them and they have history yet to make. I like tools to have personality before they lie on my bench.

Categories: Hand Tools

Teaching Carving and Demo

Badger Woodworks - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:23pm

This Saturday I taught my first woodworking class.

I’m just going to take a moment to dwell on that last sentence.  It’s a big one for me.  A sort of “Level Up” moment in my life.  I’ve always been a guy who makes stuff, or fixes things, or takes things apart (sorry mom) and sometimes puts them back together.  But being a “teacher” of woodworking is brain-stretcher for me.

This journey down the woodworking rabbit hole has been pretty interesting, and I look at people like Chris Schwarz and Peter Follansbee as teachers, guides, and generally cool people.   (and sorry Chris, but I did model my teaching style on yours a little bit, I know that probably gives you a little heartburn but it fits well with my style.)

Saturday I did the first part of the class as it is a two parter, and we covered the basics while carving a single panel.

Students at the Flat Relief Carving Class.  Rockler, Northgate Seattle WA 4/12/14

Students at the Flat Relief Carving Class. Rockler, Northgate Seattle WA 4/12/14

RocklerClass (5)

Students at the Flat Relief Carving Class. Rockler, Northgate Seattle WA 4/12/14

RocklerClass (1)

Students at the Flat Relief Carving Class. Rockler, Northgate Seattle WA 4/12/14

First we covered the gouge cut decoration along the top and bottom edge of a piece of oak.  This showed how to hold the chisel, dividers, carving mallet.  The repetition allowed them to build some muscle memory and get a feel for the motions and for the materials.

Then we did a simple repeated arc pattern in the center area.  This showed them layout with dividers, and lots of practice with the V tool.  As well as some design at the point of the tool for the floral decoration, and some punch work with the accents.   One student finished, the other got at least the core design down.  All in all it was successful for me as a teacher in that I got through what I wanted in somewhat the order I wanted to.  I had gauged the right amount of work and discussion.  They both felt more comfortable with the tools by the end, and their work was improving each step.

Things that I learned.

  • Cover more about sharpening, and bring my sharpening equipment so I can fix a battered chisel.
  • Get better wood than the Oak we used.  It was case hardened, and had some wiggly grain which was a frustration.
  • Make sure I have a anti-fatigue mat at my bench to ease my aching knees.
  • The class itself was little too advanced for a first time class at this venue.  I’m thinking of doing a simpler class on letter carving (which I already have one student signed up for if I do it.)

The students were very interesting.  One lady brought her fathers tools, and a great story about how he used them and passed them to her.  It was a beautiful set, I mean LOOK at these.

A bit of History

A bit of History

A beautiful set of carving tools with a great bit of history.

A beautiful set of carving tools with a great bit of history.

It was a great experience, and I’m glad I was able to help her connect with her past a little.

The other student was from Nepal and his home village there had a tradition of woodcarving.  He wanted to learn some of it and he took my class to see if it was something that he could do.  Both students seemed to enjoy the class, and I got a good compliment at the end saying I was a great teacher.  I’m not great at taking praise, but I’m glad it went well for everyone.

In two weeks we’ll pick up where we left off (hopefully with better wood) and tackle some S Scroll carving.

Badger

Categories: Hand Tools

Class space still available!

Mary May, Woodcarver - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 1:39pm

Mary May - Woodcarver

One of the beginning carving projects - carving a camellia flower!

One of the beginning carving projects – carving a camellia flower!

I have several beginning carving classes coming up that still have spaces available. Come join us!

May 2 – 4, Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking I will be teaching a class on the Fundamentals of Furniture Carving. This is a beginning class where I will go over the basics of relief carving – acanthus leaf, shell & linenfold in shallow relief. Check out the full description by clicking the link to the school above.

I am also going to be teaching a beginning carving class in Germany! Yeah! I really want to make sure that it fills, so PLEASE, PLEASE if you are in the Berlin, Germany area June 19 – 21, please join us! It will be at the Dictum School.

Another class that still has spaces available is the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Maine. This is a full week class on basic carving techniques.

There are still some spaces available in classes later in the year also and you can see them on my class schedule.

Maybe my online video school isn’t helping my class enrollment? I wonder… maybe I’m creating my own competition! I guess that’s not a bad thing…

Stupid!

Kees - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 12:51pm
Being in a hurry, not clamping down stuff. While cleaning out a joint, my chisel slipped right into my thumb. The chisel was sharp....


Stupid! The damage isn't too bad, just a fleshwound. But this easilly takes a week to cure.

Categories: General Woodworking

Customer Project.

David Barron Furniture - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 11:34am

A good customer sent me some pictures of his chisel box and he's really gone to town!
The curved openings give the lid a three dimensional feel and the subtle burrs look very nice on the top.


The hinges look like Andrew Crawford's fine stop hinges, they are very discreet and easy to instal.
The Japanese chisels look good quality, I hope so with such a nice box to live in!



Categories: Hand Tools

Coolest Machine Ever!

The Barn on White Run - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 7:49am

IMG_5484

While touring the Krohn Conservatory in Cincinnati last week we encountered, well I encountered, “machine lust.”  The staff was constructing a new exhibit in one of the conservatory halls, and there was a young fellow using this machine.  Given the tasks awaiting me at the homestead over the coming years of morphing fully into my emergent status as an Appalachian American, where the main crop is rocks, it seems a perfect fit.  That, and a bush hog.  Yep, I think one of these is nearly obligatory.

Now if I can persuade the CFO…

A Kerfing Plane in Florida

The Unplugged Woodshop - Tom Fidgen - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 7:05am
  I received a letter from Matt, in Florida, who made himself a Kerfing Plane following my design. Matt wrote me a note saying he kind of, Frankensteined the body, arms and fence, but I wanted to re-iterate that it’s not about the wood species...
Categories: Hand Tools

VIDEO: Hand Cut Dovetails Part 6: Mark the Tail Angles

Wood and Shop - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:05am

VIDEO 6/15 of Joshua Farnsworth’s free hand cut dovetail video series shows how to mark the angles of the tails on the board faces.

This is a very detailed tutorial designed to teach beginners how to become expert at dovetailing by hand. It is offered as a free resource to encourage the revival of traditional woodworking.

hand-cut-dovetails

This detailed video series was inspired by a 5 day class that I took from Roy Underhill and Bill Anderson: world-renowned experts on traditional woodworking with hand tools.

Which traditional hand tools should you buy?

If you need advice on which hand tools to buy (and not buy), then definitely read my 13 category buying guide article: “Which Hand Tools Do You need for Traditional Woodworking?”

Shortcuts to Dovetail Videos 1-15:

Senco & Pizza

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:00am

Senco, pizza and Popular Woodworking Magazine. All I can add, at the moment, is May 7th, 2014. Stay tuned; details to come. You might want to check out this little video. —Chuck Bender  

The post Senco & Pizza appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Yeah, But What Is It?

The Furniture Record - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 9:50pm

They called it a 19th century Yellow Pine Lidded Storage Box. Accurate but not the whole story.

The local auction a few days back was a bit of a disappointment. I had high hopes for the other auction house at their Friday night auction. Unfortunately, this week, theirs wasn’t much better. At least from my perspective. Some might be thrilled.

Only a few things of interest. There is this one piece that defied an easy explanation. It is a yellow pine lidded storage box. But why does it take this form? I want to know the rest of the story. Let’s start with a look at the box in question.

Yellow pine lidded storage box, or is it?

Yellow pine lidded storage box, or is it?

Note the staple(?) on the side near the bottom. There is one on the other side as well. Was this an attachment point?

Here is the lidded part.

The lid, no hinges. Two battens hold the lid in place.

The lid, no hinges. Two battens hold the lid in place.

With a forged hasp.

Hand forged hasp. Can't order this one from a catalog.

Hand forged hasp. Can’t order this one from a catalog.

This view let’s you see the kerfed and rounded end. (Kerfing is placing a series of parallel saw cuts on the back of a board to allow it to bend.

Kerfed board wrapping the round end. Lots of nails.

Kerfed board wrapping the round end. Lots of nails.

Full 3/4" sides wrapped with 1/4" to 3/8" wood.

Full 3/4″ sides wrapped with 1/4″ to 3/8″ wood.

This interior view really shows the kerf cuts.

See the kerfs?  Makes bending without heat possible.

See the kerfs? Makes bending without heat possible.

And we need the top view.

The top view. Lots of nails.

The top view. Lots of nails.

Let me throw in this bonus tilt-top table. It is a full table and not a candle stand.

A bit rough but serviceable.

A bit rough but serviceable.

What makes this one interesting is the feet.

Would you call it a stylized talon? Click for an alternate view.

Would you call it a stylized talon? Click for an alternate view.

And the obligatory dovetail shot.

Less than satisfying. Might be machine cut

Less than satisfying. Might be machine cut

Not my favorite ever.


Last Week’s Spoons Finished

The Literary Workshop Blog - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 6:44pm

Last week, I had roughed out some spoons from cherry and then set them aside to dry a little bit.  Last night, I finished shaping them with a spokeshave and smoothed them out with a card scraper.  This afternoon, I sanded and finished them.

Cherry Spoons 4-2014 - - 1 Cherry Spoons 4-2014 - - 2

The wood did twist a little as it dried, so I’m glad I left the handles thick enough to make adjustments to the handles.  There was no checking or cracking to speak of, which was a relief.  I’m also glad I was able to capture some of the natural curves of the wood in the handles.

I should point out that the three oddly-shaped spoons on the left represent my latest attempts to carve spoons Sloyd-style from some mystery wood.  It looks a bit like soft maple, but I don’t think it is, as the wood came from across the street, and maples don’t grow widely here.  It’s also significantly softer than soft maple.

Not counting the wait-time between coats of finish, those eight cherry spoons probably took about 5-6 hours from start to finish.  I’m pleased with how they turned out.


Tagged: cherry, wood spoon, wooden spoons

A Roorkee Footstool

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 3:46pm

roorkee_footstool2_IMG_8950

The principles behind the Roorkee chair can be easily adapted to other forms of furniture besides chairs. Its loose-tenon joinery has been used to make beds and even tables on occasion.

Today, however, I saw my first Roorkee footstool.

This weekend I visited the new Lee Valley store in Vaughan, Ontario, to deliver a couple talks on workbench design and campaign furniture. For my talk on campaign furniture, I brought along five campaign pieces (Me to border guard: “No, I am not invading your country”). But I didn’t have a Roorkee chair with me – my last one sold to a customer.

vincent_IMG_8953

So I was happy when local woodworker Vincent brought along two Roorkee chairs he had made – plus a Roorkee footstool that was built using the same principles.

Made using purpleheart, the stool had a thigh strap and a slanted seat cover, just like a Roorkee chair. The rest of the attendees were gaga over it, taking photos and trying it out.

Vincent also made some nice modifications to the original Roorkee plan. Instead of turning round stretchers, he made his stretchers octagonal and terminated with a tapered tenon. They looked very nice – I’ll have to try that on a future chair.

Also, the “grip” turning at the top of the chair bowed out slightly in the middle instead of being straight. It looked nice and felt nice in the hand as well.

All in all, the new Lee Valley store is quite nice. The company is trying out some new things with this store. So if you are ever driving north of Toronto on the 400, be sure to stop and chck it out.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Books in Print, Campaign Furniture
Categories: Hand Tools

Pages

Subscribe to Norse Woodsmith aggregator


by Dr. Radut