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Final Finish a Dresser Coated

Paul Sellers - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 5:39am

This week I finally applied the closing coats of finish to my three-drawer chest. It’s quite a long process taking it from the early design stage through prototyping. It’s important that the final piece fits the plan and on a larger project like this one, one with many hidden complexities, that all the bugs are worked through. …

Read the full post Final Finish a Dresser Coated on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Vegans and woodworking.

Mulesaw - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 5:10am
My daughter has been a vegetarian for some time, to see what it is like. She is not fanatical in any way at all, so she eat meat when she is home, but at her boarding school they have a special vegetarians menu that she likes.

During the finishing of the travelling bookcases, she watched me apply some shellac. 

I have a hard time understanding vegans, but that might just be because I am not smart enough.
Laura knows more about that way of life than I do, so we ended up talking about that while I proceeded with the shellac.

Apparently vegans shouldn't eat or use anything that is made by an animal unless it is not supposed to be used by the animal itself.
I only thought that they weren't supposed to eat stuff, but Laura said that it was harder than that. 
So it made me wonder if vegans can use shellac as a finish at all?

If the beetle produce the shellac for a purpose, it means that they can't use that finish.
If the shellac in the other hand is a waste product that the beetle doesn't use for anything, it should be OK.

I guess bees wax as a finish is also ruled out if you are a vegan.

Technically it doesn't mean a lot to me, since I am not a vegan, but I found the subject a bit interesting.
A bit akin to imposing a 100% hand tool use on yourself, or Only to use domestic woods etc.

So does anyone know a vegan woodworker and perhaps through this know if they can use shellac and bees wax?




Categories: Hand Tools

Tapping Out a Japanese Plane Blade with Andrew Hunter

Giant Cypress - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 3:18am
Tapping Out a Japanese Plane Blade with Andrew Hunter:

Really nice video from Andrew Hunter and Ben Strano showing how to tap out a Japanese plane blade.

Here’s my take on this task. And here’s a video I made, albeit with far lower production standards.

Andrew’s giving some talks on Japanese tools at Fine Woodworking Live in April. He gives a great talk, and is a great guy. Go see him if you can.

Dovetail Markers Finished

David Barron Furniture - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 1:15am

In-between other jobs, I've managed to finish off a batch of dovetail markers. I enjoy this close miniature work but it takes a lot of concentration and care to get clean dovetails. Each leg is just 45 mm (1 3/4") but they are just the right size for the job.


These are a one off and I'll be bringing them to Handworks in May.


Categories: Hand Tools

got a new molding plane.......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 12:16am
Before I got to playing with the new plane, I did the finishing steps on Box #1. Without a finish, it is done. If I decide to put a finish on it, it isn't done. I'm staying in the without a finish camp for now. I have one more molding plane coming too but I'm not sure. I missed getting one and Josh emailed me saying he got another of the same but it's better. I told him to send it to me but I haven't gotten the confirmation email yet.

shaved the glue blocks
This flushing of the glue blocks is something I thought of today off and on. I planned on using a small block plane. The problem with that was trying to just shave the blocks flush and not plane anything off the bottom of the sides. If I came in at an angle and used the corner of the iron that would work. The visibility of where the iron was in relation to the glue block would be difficult to see.

I did the same plan with the chisel I had in mind for the block plane. I used the corner of the chisel in a sweeping motion starting on the bottom edge going into the glue block. I flushed them and took nothing off of the bottom of the sides. And it was quick and easy to do.

tap tap tap - even tighter than yesterday
knocked the corners off
I'll leave these as they are for now. I almost rounded them off after I sawed them and there is a high probability that may still happen.

glamour shot #1
last glamour shot
Examples of boxes made exactly like this had been found in a 2000 year old Roman shipwreck.  It's a very good design that hasn't changed for an awfully long time.

still brand new and unused
I bought these at the last Amana hand tool event in 2015. I have watched Don Williams finishing DVD 3 times where he extols a plain wax finish. I'm still not sure about it and how it would compete with shellac. I may find out if the finish itch needs to get scratched.

buying molding planes can be addictive
This is a 5/8" torus bead plane that Joshua at Hyperkitten said was an unusual small size. Small size is what made me buy the plane. I don't know what I'll use it for but I'll be adding it to the herd.

I had to try it out
I flattened and squared two faces on this piece of scrap for the test run. The grain is going right to left and I'm ready to make a torus bead.

both hands on the plane like this
The right hand is on the heel the same way the left hand is on the toe. You start at the far left end and progressively move backwards to the right.

this is what you end up with
Looks pretty close to what a astragal looks like except the left side wall is 'pointy' where an astragal leaves a groove.

looking down it from the end
Out of the box I got a clean profile end to end. This is douglas fir too which can be a royal PITA to mold edges cleanly on.

boxing was loose
I was able to pull both of these out with no coaxing at all. I scrapped off the old hide glue (I'm assuming it's hide glue based on the age of the plane) with a sheet rock knife.

lightly scraped the bottom of the boxwood grooves with a 1/8" chisel
gluing them back in with hide glue
boxing glued in
Killed a few minutes lightly sanding the iron's few rust spots to get a better look see at the business end. The more I use these planes, then more I feel like there isn't any need to go 21st century nutso sharpening these. On the other hand, I think the frequent readers of this dribble know that I do like shiny. And it doesn't necessarily have to be brass.

I'll leave the plane in the vise until it sets up tomorrow. I'll probably sharpen and hone the iron then too. Considering the age of this plane it is in pretty good shape. It will definitely be a good user.

box #2 tails
I chopped the tails on box #2 which puts me one step closer to having it done. This will be the inside of the box and it hasn't been touched with a plane or sandpaper.  These are the reference faces.

inside edges
The two reference faces lay up against each flat and straight, end to end.

the outside faces
These have been planed and I eyeballed everything doing it. I didn't use winding sticks to check for twist nor a straight edge to check for a hump or hollow. I am doing this box the same way I did box #1. The insides faces are just about 100%  perfect and the outside ones I can plane to make them look pretty.

two outsides faces laid up against each other
As you can see these faces don't look the same as the two inside ones did. It doesn't make any difference as long as I pay attention to my reference face and edge.

the box as it will go together
Making sure when I transfer the tails to the pin board that I keep the numbers aligned and the reference faces together is what matters. I will also scribe my baselines matching each corner so I won't have proud or shallow tails and pins. With this setup you can't gang cut the pins and tails because each corner is slightly different.

I'm 180 out
When I laid out my box and numbered my corners I did them wrong. I always make the bottom edge my reference. But this time I wasn't paying attention and the outside face was on the inside and the inside face on the outside. In order to straighten out that mistake (noticed it after I had sawn the tails), I had to put the reference edge as my top. It's not a deal breaker and I should end up with the same box as #1. But smaller.

 accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was the first 7 foot tall professional basketball player?
answer - Ralph (Sky) Siewert

A Walk in the Woods in January

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 8:47pm

In case you haven’t looked out your windows for a while, it’s the middle of winter. (Californians and South Floridians are exempted from noticing.) Everything is gray, the trees have no leaves, and no one in their right mind would go out into the woods to identify trees this time of year, right?

So what are we waiting for? Let’s go! I live in Athens County in southeastern Ohio, in the Appalachian foothills, so we’ll begin by taking a look at some of the trees in my yard.

First, I have to admit that I lied about the trees having no leaves. A few kinds of trees do hang onto their leaves until very late in the winter, which makes them easy to pick out. I managed to get three species into one photo:

leaves

In late fall and winter, the leaves of red oak (Quercus rubra) are a rich brown. White oak (Q. alba) has leaves that are paler and grayer. American beech (Fagus grandifolia) has very pale, almost yellow leaves, and as you walk through the forest in winter, the sapling beech trees are obvious.

The overall shape of a tree can be useful in identification, but it can also be misleading. A tree growing in isolation (in the middle of a pasture, say) has a characteristic shape that varies quite a bit from one species to another. Forest trees, on the other hand, are much more similar in shape. For that reason, features of the bark and morphological details (e.g., branching pattern) are much more useful in the forest.

Red oaks are some of the most common trees in my yard, and they invariably have a bark pattern that is both unique and easy to spot:

redoak

The bark consists of a smooth(ish) medium gray (sometimes slightly brownish) ground interrupted by ragged vertical grooves that are considerably darker. On larger individuals, the bark near ground level may be much rougher than this, but you can always find this pattern if you look at the upper limbs.

The bark of white oaks is very different, a very pale gray (hence the name), flaking off in scales:

whiteoak1

That particular tree has relatively small scales; here’s another (about the same diameter) whose scales are much larger:

whiteoak2

Both red and white oaks are generalists, found in a variety of habitats. There are many other species of oak in Ohio, but most of them have specific habitat requirements. One of these specialists is the chestnut oak (Q. montana):

chestnutoak

Chestnut oaks are found only near ridge tops, most often on the south-facing slope (which happens to be exactly where I live). The bark of the chestnut oak is dark and deeply furrowed. If you picture a cross section of the tree, the profile of the bark ridges would look something like the teeth of a gear.

Another very common tree in the yard is the red maple (Acer rubrum):

redmaple

Red maples have a split personality; the bark of young trees is pale gray and very smooth (much like American beech, which I don’t have a photo of here). As the tree grows, the bark starts to split and darken, becoming much craggier. In a large tree, there is no trace of the smooth gray on the bark near the ground, but you can still find it if you look up. The bark of the silver maple (A. saccarhinum) is similar, but silver maples are restricted primarily to bottomland, where the soil contains more moisture. (Red maples, like the two oaks above, are generalists.)

Sugar maple (A. saccharum) has a medium gray bark that flakes off to expose an orangeish background:

sugarmaple

The appearance of the bark is intermediate in all respects, so other than the orange background (which you sometimes see on white oaks, too) there really isn’t any one thing that tells you it’s a sugar maple. It’s kind of a process of elimination.

By the way, late January/early February is the time of year in this part of the country to tap sugar maples for making syrup and sugar. The best sap flow occurs when temperatures cycle above freezing during the day and back down below freezing at night. The prime tapping season is progressively later as you move north, as late as April in southern Canada.

There are two species of ash common in this area, white ash (Fraxinus americana), and green ash (F. pennsylvanica). (To confuse matters, green ash is also known as red ash.) White and green ash have very similar bark, fairly pale overall and consisting of narrow vertical ridges that often cross over each other, forming “X” patterns:

ashsp

I believe that this example is a green ash, but I can’t be sure without getting a close look at the leaves, and unfortunately the lowest leaves on this tree are about 50 ft. above the ground.

As you may be aware, most of the North American ash species are seriously threatened by the introduced emerald ash borer. It is expected that over 99% of green ash trees will die over the next several years. White ash fares slightly better, but populations of both species (along with black ash, a more northerly species) are being devastated. A small number of individual trees appear to be resistant to the borer, so there is some hope that they will eventually be able to recover.

One of the most important forest trees in this area (Liriodendron tulipfera) goes by many names. The name preferred by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) is “tuliptree,” but woodworkers know it as “yellow poplar,” “tulip poplar,” or even just “poplar” (which is especially misleading, as it is unrelated to true poplars):

tuliptree

The bark of tuliptree is much like that of ash, with narrow vertical ridges, but is overall quite a bit darker, sometimes appearing almost black. This particular individual has a lot of the same sort of “X” pattern that ashes do, but not all tuliptrees show this. Tuliptree is one species where the overall shape of the tree is useful in identification, even in the forest: tuliptrees are arrow-straight (usually the straightest, most vertical trees in the forest), and the branches are restricted to the very top of the tree.

Here’s another tuliptree, with a big problem:

tuliptreedead

During the summer of 2015, we had a spell of very hot, dry weather. Many of the tuliptrees in this area and neighboring West Virginia were weakened and eventually killed by the drought. Some of these dead trees are now exhibiting this odd pattern of flaking bark.

Not every tree loses its leaves in the winter, of course. American holly (Ilex opaca) is primarily a tree of the southeastern forests, but there are a few scattered small hollies in my yard, such as this one, which is about 8 ft. tall:

amholly

I haven’t been able to figure out whether these individuals are native, at the very northern limit of their range, or escaped from cultivation. There is no record for Athens County for the species in the USDA PLANTS database, but there are records from some of the surrounding counties.

Incidentally, a good place to see much larger (and definitely native) American holly is along the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Maryland.

The leaves of American holly make it easy to identify:

amhollyfoliage

The leaves are a dark, shiny green, about two inches long and with very sharp spines along the margins.

Another bit of green in the yard comes from a scattering of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana):

eredcedar

Redcedars are normally more conically shaped than this, but this is what happens when your yard is overrun by deer. As the scientific name suggests, redcedar is not actually a cedar, but a kind of juniper. The wood that is sold as “aromatic cedar” comes from this species.

Interestingly, redcedars have two kinds of foliage. On the upper part of the tree, the foliage has a typical juniper-like appearance:

eredcedarfoliage1

But seedlings and the lower portion of trees that have been ravaged by deer have a much different foliage:

eredcedarfoliage2

This juvenile foliage is quite prickly, and is an apparent attempt by the tree to dissuade browsers. It seems to work for the seedlings, which don’t get munched too badly, but it obviously doesn’t for the larger trees.

In addition to the large trees that make up the forest canopy, there are smaller trees that form the understory. One of the more common understory trees in the yard is flowering dogwood (Cornus florida):

dogwood

The trees are small, usually less than 6″ in diameter, and the bark is broken up into numerous small roundish plates. But the easiest way to identify a dogwood in winter is the flower buds, which are usually plentiful and have a characteristic turban-like shape:

dogwoodbuds

That’s it for now. I hope this inspires you to take a walk in your own woods. (Did I mention that there’s going to be a test later?) If you do, a couple of cautions:

  • Remember that poison ivy (poison oak in the west) is plentiful in the forest, especially around openings, and like the trees, sheds its leaves. Be careful what you touch.
  • Before walking in the forest, check with your state wildlife agency to determine the deer season dates for your area, and be sure to wear appropriate orange clothing if there is any chance of being in the same forest at the same time as a hunter.

–Steve Schafer


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

chipping away at things

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 6:21pm

 

Got a smattering of snow the other day.,..this was the view from my desk yesterday morning.

desk-window

I write blog posts around photographs, so when there’s no photos, there’s no blog. I’ve been splitting my time many different ways lately, some work (slowly) on the shop; installing cement board to shield the walls from the wood stove. Hardly worth a photo….pretty uninspiring.

One thing I have done lately is collecting some cherry crooks for spoon carving. A friend cut down a large cherry tree, and I swooped in for the upper branches. Lots of crooks there, some burls too. Those are mostly new for me, I turned a burl bowl once…but I’m going to try carving these.

crooks-hiding-in-the-snow

burl

I started two new versions of a spoon with a hook under its handle (a crook with a hook) – I dug out this one I never finished, it’s apple.

apple-hook

bark-in-bowl

A very exaggerated form here, but I was very happy with the profile. The hooks are usually/always a lot smaller than this…but I really liked the curves here. This one got abandoned because of a void in the bowl. You can see a crack with trapped bark and grit there. It’s quite deep, no way to salvage this one. So it stands as a sample…

I have two in cherry underway, (one very large one, one more sane-sized) but neither have the sinuous curve this one has. Where’s those other big crooks?

three-hooks

next-crook

In the mail a couple of weeks ago arrived two spoons – I was very pleased with the overall forms and carving, but the finial on the lighter (dogwood) spoon knocked me out…Micah Green is the carver, see his stuff on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/whittlerjoel/

two-spoons


mouse

 

This weekend I’m back in Connecticut to teach the continuing joined chest class…

better-chest-view

This time, drawers and lids. So next week, I should have a finished chest finally….it will ultimately go in the exhibition at Fuller Craft Museum – featuring the artisans from Plymouth Craft. This show will be up into June during Greenwood Fest… http://fullercraft.org/event/living-traditions-the-handwork-of-plymouth-craft/  There will be lots more about this exhibition as it comes together. One feature during the exhibition and the festival will be Jogge Sundqvist’s Rhythym & Slojd presentation. More details to come…

UPDATE – I forgot to tell you, Maureen has put some of her knitting & felted stuff on sale. Apparently spring will come at some point, so time to move some winter stuff along. Here’s the link: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

Sale Hand knit hand dyed scarf, blue and periwinkle lace waves scarf, merino wool hand dyed yarn, woman's scarf, long

 


Axe Maintenance: Touching up an Edge

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 2:39pm

 

Regular readers know my work philosophy is pretty laid back. I don’t sweat tear out on secondary surfaces, I think knots are fine for drawer parts and back boards, etc…

That’s why when it comes to axe edge maintenance, some might be surprised at how fastidious I am about keeping it tip top. Some folks don’t feel a need to keep up on their coarser tools but I don’t buy that distinction. When your coarse prep relies on human muscle rather than machines, a keen edge is your best friend. I’ve wasted too much time straining myself working with dull tools. Saving two minutes of sharpening only to grunt through 20 minutes of miserable work is dumb. It’s simply not worth ignoring your edges.

When I take out my axe, it’s because I need to remove a lot of wood. So if my edge isn’t awesome you bet I’m going to take the time to tune it up. If I’m in the shop I’ll use my water stones but if I’m outside or working in the barn at my house, I turn to my EZE-LAP diamond paddles. I picked these up based on the recommendation of my good friend, Tim Manney. I’m glad I did. The two grits: fine and super fine are all I need to get back to work in no time.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

I never sharpen my axes holding them in midair. I hone the edges in one of two ways... The first way is by setting the axe head on edge on a stable surface like a bench. With the axe still, I can polish the very edge with both grits without things moving around on me.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

The other (and better) way I do this is by hanging the bevel off the edge of a low bench. This provides the most rigidity. It’s as secure as honing on my stationary water stones.

Having either the tool or the sharpening medium stationary is the key to success for me. Most of my failures in sharpening have been when I’m hotdogging it in midair.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

Besides picking up a pair of these EZE-LAP paddles, the best advice I can give you based on my failures is to make sure things are stationary. Not only is it more secure, but there is a whole lot less to think about.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Axe Maintenance: Touching up an Edge

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 2:39pm

 

Regular readers know my work philosophy is pretty laid back. I don’t sweat tear out on secondary surfaces, I think knots are fine for drawer parts and back boards, etc…

That’s why when it comes to axe edge maintenance, some might be surprised at how fastidious I am about keeping it tip top. Some folks don’t feel a need to keep up on their coarser tools but I don’t buy that distinction. When your coarse prep relies on human muscle rather than machines, a keen edge is your best friend. I’ve wasted too much time straining myself working with dull tools. Saving two minutes of sharpening only to grunt through 20 minutes of miserable work is dumb. It’s simply not worth ignoring your edges.

When I take out my axe, it’s because I need to remove a lot of wood. So if my edge isn’t awesome you bet I’m going to take the time to tune it up. If I’m in the shop I’ll use my water stones but if I’m outside or working in the barn at my house, I turn to my EZE-LAP diamond paddles. I picked these up based on the recommendation of my good friend, Tim Manney. I’m glad I did. The two grits: fine and super fine are all I need to get back to work in no time.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

I never sharpen my axes holding them in midair. I hone the edges in one of two ways... The first way is by setting the axe head on edge on a stable surface like a bench. With the axe still, I can polish the very edge with both grits without things moving around on me.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

The other (and better) way I do this is by hanging the bevel off the edge of a low bench. This provides the most rigidity. It’s as secure as honing on my stationary water stones.

Having either the tool or the sharpening medium stationary is the key to success for me. Most of my failures in sharpening have been when I’m hotdogging it in midair.

Axe sharpening eze-lap diamond stone

Besides picking up a pair of these EZE-LAP paddles, the best advice I can give you based on my failures is to make sure things are stationary. Not only is it more secure, but there is a whole lot less to think about.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Prep Stock by Hand – Christopher Schwarz Shows You How

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 11:28am
prep rough stock by hand

Stock prep by hand might sound like a great workout (and it can be if there’s a lot of it), but it isn’t at hard as you might think – particularly if you have only a couple of boards to take from rough to ready. In this longish video excerpt from “Build a Hand-crafted Bookcase,” Christopher Schwarz shows you how he uses winding sticks and handplanes (hint: a jack does most of […]

The post Prep Stock by Hand – Christopher Schwarz Shows You How appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Queen Anne Chair Construction

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 10:29am
fig1

FIG. 1. TYPICAL CHAIR OF THE PERIOD, WITH SHAPED SEAT. This particular chair was made by the halved method given at D, Fig. 2.

This is an excerpt from “The Woodworker: The Charles H. Hayward Years: Volume IV” published by Lost Art Press.

Most readers know that the vast majority of chairs are made by tenoning (and sometimes dowelling) the seat rails into the legs. Normally there is no difficulty, the mortises (or occasionally the tenons) being at a slight slope to allow for the splay of the rails. In certain period chairs, however, this is awkward in that the plan shape of the seat is curved. There are no angular front corners, the whole thing taking the form of a continuous sweep as in the Queen Anne chair shown in Fig. 1. Thus to enable the rail shoulders to be square the top rectangular portion of the leg has to be cut down considerably as at A, Fig. 2. This means a loss of strength in itself, but in addition there is a little wood left in which the mortises can be cut. In fact there is only the roughly triangular shape left, and the tenons are necessarily restricted in length. Furthermore the shape of the rails means that there is a great deal of cross grain.

Still, this system of construction was sometimes followed, and the craftsmen got over the difficulty by fixing stout inside brackets (see shaded part at A, Fig. 2). These had the effect of binding the two rails together. Since the brackets might be anything up to 2 in. thick the strength was sufficient for the job.

FIG. 2. (A) TENONED CONSTRUCTION. (B) HALVED FRAMED METHOD. (C) HALVING JOINTS. (D) LEG JOINTS fig2d fig2c


Alternative Construction.
The awkward form of construction must have been realised, however, and this, no doubt, was the reason for the alternative method by which the front and side rails were halved together, the shape cut in them, and the leg either tenoned or dovetailed up into the frame so formed. The dotted lines show the squares of timber required to enable the shape to be worked, and it should be noted that the inner shape is plotted so that the thickness is considerably wider over the legs, so avoiding much loss of strength owing to short grain.

Fig. 2, C. shows the first stage in which the parts are halved together, and the rear shoulders marked round. In practice the craftsman probably cut and fitted the rear tenons first as it would be awkward to fit them after the frame was assembled. After cutting the tenons the halved joints would be glued up as at C and, the glue having set, the shape sawn out as at D, Fig. 2. Some chairmakers preferred to cut tenons at the top of the legs, and corresponding mortises had to be chopped in the frame. Others cut a dovetail shape as at D, Fig. 2, and formed a notch to receive it in the outer surface of the frame as shown by the dotted lines. In either case the dovetail or the tenon passed right across the halved joint and so served to bind it together.

It will be realised that all these Queen Anne chairs were cross-veneered around the rails, and this hid any unsightly joints. The top-moulding forming the rebate for the loose seat was either planted on the top edge, or was let into a rebate worked around the edge before veneering.

Meghan Bates

 


Filed under: Charles H. Hayward at The Woodworker
Categories: Hand Tools

Moulding Plane Part A update

Journeyman's Journal - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 7:20am

Here’s a quick update to keep you in the loop.  I haven’t progressed at all due to the delay of the irons, it turns out that LN never had any to begin with yet it was listed on their site. So questions have been asked why was it advertised in the first place but no one has an answer, so I’ve ordered the 1 1/8 instead.  They should of arrived today but hoping tomorrow they will.

As the width of this plane has been thicknessed to exactly 1 1/4 I will need to remove 1/8 to accept the new iron from the escapement side.  Then I can proceed to making a wedge.

I went ahead and built this wedge planing holder, the strips has about a 15 degree spread.  20170203_003154

As you can see where I stuffed up on the mouth, it’s a bit too big but if it does cause ay problems in the future I can always build another one.

20170202_194725

But like I said before it will be a very rare occasion that I will actually use a plane this size and what’s the bet I now jinxed myself and end up using it more often than not.

Today I bought some pine, not structural but furniture grade.  If I bought structural then I would have to wait for them dry which would take a couple of months.  These will be prototypes, if I stuff up on them I will learn from those mistakes like I did with the mouth opening.  And if I do stuff up which I’m confident this time around I won’t, it won’t hurt as much on the pocket as Beech does.  I should of done this before but I was confident even though I haven’t done one for a 1 year.  So today I planed them all down and laminated them.  They will take 24 hrs to dry  and the last glue up was around 6pm, so I’ll hold off till Saturday.  I actually will do one just to see how this glue will work in a 12 hour period.  I know Patrick Edwards did say it’s best to wait 24hrs but it should be fine after 12hrs and it is summer here, winter I would definitely wait it out the full 24hrs.

_dsc1442

I was surprised though how little glue I actually needed to make 4 blanks, the pot was 3/4 full and a 1/4 was still left over which I threw in the freezer after I spent a great deal of time trying to convince my wife that its natural stuff.  It would of been ok if I did leave it on the bench, it would take atleast 3 weeks before it went off but it’s still best to keep it fresh and chuck it in the fridge.

_dsc1440

Don’t ask me what the LH stands for, who knows what went through my head when I typed it.

This last photo is the beech blanks all glued up ready to go.  The only downside to using this hide glue is the colour contrast you see here.  Some parts of the plane you don’t see the glue line and other parts you do.  I think a white PVA that dries clear would mask that glue line nicely, but comes time when I rub some finish on it this colour contrast may disappear.

20170202_194954

Here is the iron blank I’ll be working with next.

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It’s O1 tool steel that’s tapered to accept the wedge.

The numbering system are based on the radius and blade width, each planemaker can vary using this system.  The antique round I have has a 7/16″ radius and width blade but the maker stamped a number 8 which doesn’t correspond to other moulding planes that size.

So I will be using the Clarke & Williams version which I believe was common in the 18th century.  So the number 8 would actually be a number 7.  I think this will be more period appropriate.

It’s a pity that these irons were delayed as I would of been finished by now, but then again what’s the rush.  It’s not like I can afford to buy these irons all at once.


Categories: Hand Tools

Garage Sale Tools – 360w360 E.220

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 4:00am
Garage Sale Tools – 360w360 E.220

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking the 360 guys talk with Ron Herman about garage sale tools.

Join the guys twice each week for six lively minutes of discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more). Chuck & Glen, and sometimes a surprise guest, all have their own opinions. Sometimes they agree and sometimes they don’t, but the conversation is always information packed and lots of fun.

If you have topics you’d like to hear covered in future episodes, click here to send an email to the guys.

Continue reading Garage Sale Tools – 360w360 E.220 at 360 WoodWorking.

The Woodworking Show, Somerset, NJ

Giant Cypress - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 3:58am

In case anyone is going to the Woodworking Show in Somerset, NJ, on the weekend of  Feb. 17, my woodworking club, the Central Jersey Woodworkers Association, will be there. We’ll have a booth there and an ongoing series of demonstrations.

I’ll be there all day on Friday, Feb. 17, and Saturday morning (Feb. 18) demoing Japanese tools (of course). I’ll be showing how to use Japanese tools to cut joinery, even if you have a workshop already set up in the western tradition.

Hope to see you there!

WSBO, vote for your favourite shelf.

Mulesaw - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 1:42am
All the entries for the WSBO are now listed.

Please take a look at the many different and great looking shelves that the participants made, and please vote for your 3 personal favourites.

I guess the more people that will vote and show their interest in the build, the likelier it is that Chris Wong will arrange another build off in the future.


Categories: Hand Tools

box #1 is done.......

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 12:48am
It's lacking a finish but I am also keeping this box for myself so it may not get one. I made the decision to keep it for me tonight while I was working on it. I have a couple of similar boxes in the shop but they are mostly taller. This is about the same length as them but it is half the height of them. I'm sure I will find something to keep in it.

step one in plugging the holes
The box is in my face vise so the scrap got stuck in the wagon vise. I sawed 6 vertical cuts, one for each plug.  Two of them were sawn a wee bit off vertical.

why2 were sawn a wee bit off vertical
The two holes on this end on the outside of a tail. The left side is plumb and the right one is sloped because of the tail. In the end the walnut plug will be a squarish size and as long as it covers the hole, I'll be happy. I did all the fitting and trimming of the plugs with a chisel.

tried something new
I saw Paul Sellers use a rasp to flush a plug today on his video woodworking class.  It worked as well for me on this small one as it did on his big one.

last one plugged
I was going to stop here but I went ahead and cleaned up the four sides with my 4 1/2.

bracing
I am a big fan of bracing on the bottom of boxes. It still amazes how much a couple of little pieces of wood can tighten up a bottom.

I split them out
Why? I don't know. For some reason I thought they would perform better if I split them out. I was looking at these and thinking how was I going to plane them? Then it dawned me to cut them to length, glue them in, and plane them afterwards. While I was standing at the bench having this revelation, I saw some scrap on the deck that was a better choice than these.

glue choices
I am going with the OBG. I like using it especially for this purpose. As the glue dries it pulls it self tighter to the sides and the bottom. I fixed these in place with a simple rub joint.

3 on the long sides and 2 on the short ones
tap tap tap
Glued in the blocks and I can already hear and feel a difference in the bottom. Tomorrow I will plane the blocks flush and then it should sound like a drum when I tap it.

front of the box
The bottom edge of the lid has a bit of fuzz on it. The front flat end grain is bit chewed up on the left here. Since it is flush already I can't sand or plane it anymore. Other then that I like the chamfer now and I think I should also do one on the ends where the groove is. Just thought of that now - having it mitered would line it up with the chamfer on the lid.

I like this astragal detail
The color hides the astragal some but it is there. I'm undecided now on a finish but I was thinking of trying a wax finish burnished/applied with a polisoir. We'll have to wait until tomorrow and see what shakes out there.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who is Dick Grayson?
answer - the name of Batman's sidekick, Robin

A George II Walnut Serpentine Chest – Part Three

Pegs and 'Tails - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 9:36pm
The walnut cross-grain moulding was formed along the serpentine front edge of the carcase’s baseboard prior to assembling the carcase (fig. 1). Fig. 1. The cross-grain moulding already opening up in the 41° (106°F) heat. I cut the one-sided dovetail … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Miter Box Extra Numbers

360 WoodWorking - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 2:49pm
Miter Box Extra Numbers

This week we were up at Ron Herman’s (woodworkingwithron.com) new shop near New Holland, Ohio. We went  to record a couple of videos and to grab a podcast or two. With Ron there is never a dull minute, and always something to learn, such as with the miter box. My guess is that by now, if you’re member of 360 Woodworking, that you already know Ron. If you’re a regular listener to our podcast you know him, too.

Continue reading Miter Box Extra Numbers at 360 WoodWorking.

Copperplate Prints Now Available for Ordering

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 1:30pm

plate_detail_img_4205

It took only 10 months (all my fault), but we are now taking orders for handmade copperplate prints from “The Anarchist’s Design Book.”

The prints will be made individually by Briony Morrow-Cribbs, the artist who created the etchings and original set of prints used in the book. Prints measure 11” x 15-3/4” and are printed on a cotton rag paper called Hahnemuhle Copperplate – the same paper used for the prints reproduced in the book.

Individual prints are $110. If you order the entire set for $1,300 they’ll come in a handmade clamshell box constructed by Mike Fallon at Ohio Book. Ordering information is here.

plate_box_detail_img_4203

We’ll be taking orders for the plates until early April. After we close the ordering, Briony will make the prints, Mike will make the boxes and we will ship your prints in protective packaging (recommended by the artist) when they are done.

Copperplate prints are rare today, but they were the primary way that woodworking and other technical information was transmitted in the 18th century. A.-J. Roubo made his own copperplate engravings for “l’Art du menuisier,” which is one of the reasons his book is such a classic.

Inspired by Roubo’s copperplate engravings, I convinced Briony to make the plates for “The Anarchist’s Design Book.” She makes etchings, not engravings, but it’s a similar intaglio process. Each plate began as a CAD sketch which I then redrew to make it more human. Then Briony made her own drawings based on mine and we went back and forth to balance the technical with the artistic aspects of each plate.

In the end, every line and stipple was etched into copper, the plates were hand inked and then embossed into the paper.

The result is unlike anything you’ll find printed today.

If you’d like to see the plates and box in person, I’ll have them at our storefront for the next two open days: Feb. 11 and March 11.

Last note: This is the only time we’ll be offering these plates for sale. We don’t seek to become an art dealer, but these prints are special and offer you a personal link to the great woodworking book traditions of the 18th century.

— Christopher Schwarz


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Categories: Hand Tools

Squaring Up to the Boss

Paul Sellers - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 11:54am

Well, anyway, I saw the square standing in the corner of my final drawer of my dresser-cum-chester-draw build as I had left it and remembered George, my old apprenticing mentor from 1965, who did the same thing. I had noticed every so often he’d leave a square on the internal corner of drawer just so …

Read the full post Squaring Up to the Boss on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

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