Hand Tool Headlines

The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

 

Search

Headlines

Hand Planing Difficult Woods.

David Barron Furniture - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 11:26am

I'm making a small batch of planes for Handworks in May, now Christmas is out of the way it seems very close now!
After band sawing the sides they need cleaning up to ensure no visible glue lines. The lignum Vitae has a reversing grain so tears out badly with standard angle planes. Here I'm using one of my high angle smoothers (54 degrees) to remove the bulk of the waste and then finishing with a finely set Bill Carter thumb plane. They made short work of this batch and were a pleasure to use.
Categories: Hand Tools

Issue Two Packing Party: Without a Hitch!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 5:03am

  

This past Friday and Saturday, Mike and I had the big Issue Two packing party. We are still so stunned at how incredible it turned out. Readers came up to help from all around Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, and even Maryland. We had just shy of 20 people wrapping a few thousand copies in brown paper and string and attach the wax-sealed tradecards. Every copy was shipped in a rigid mailer with a few pine shavings for an extra touch. 

Check out the full video for the event above!

I would definitely say it was a success. All the pre-orders are in the mail and we have a pile ready for future fulfillment. Everyone worked so hard and really seemed to have a blast doing it. I was of necessity hopping around to many areas while managing the printing of postage but I overheard so much conversation and laughing throughout the two days. The positive and playful atmosphere confirmed in my mind that this is definitely the way to send our magazine out to readers. We are doing it like this next time for sure. If you missed out and want to join in next time, we plan to throw the Issue Three packing party during the last week of November or first week of December 2017. Put it on your calendars, folks. We hope to see you there.

 

One of several van loads to the Post Office!

One of the highlights for me was the show-and-tell time we had on Friday. I asked everyone to bring some work they’ve been doing or tools to show off and, boy, was it fun! George Sawyer brought some super comfy Windsors, Danielle Rose Byrd brought bowls, there were axes, books, etc. It was all so amazing see the excitement around craftwork in general and the mutual encouragement around each other’s work.

 

My sister-in-law, Hannah, is a catering master so hiring her to organize and prepare food was a no-brainer. Totally delicious stuff, all of it. Dinner both nights was at Barncastle. There was excellent lasagna, wood-fired pizza, and Strong’s superb Soulpatch porter.

After Saturday’s dinner, Mike, Wes, and I drove the supplies through the beginning of a small snow storm to the storage unit. We basically shoved everything into the pitch black unit and planned to deal with it today. We were exhausted, it was very cold, and very dark. (Special Thank You to Wes who arrived half a day early and stayed until that bitter cold end!)

 

Mike and I are grateful from the bottom of our hearts for everyone who came to help. There’s no way we could have done this without you guys. You are amazing all of you: Wes, Steve, Jeremy, George, Danielle, Richard, Ryan, Tanya, Austin, Kerrie, Adam, Paula, Andrea, Hannah, Julia, & Megan.

 

And thank you, readers for your orders! If you’ve ordered Issue Two from our store, it is on it’s way! If you still have yet to order your copy, you can get it here.

Thank you so much, readers. Every single copy you purchase makes it possible for Mike and I to keep this independent publication going. Thank you so much for your support!

Now we sit back and watch our Instagram feeds for readers’ arrivals!

 

- Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Issue Two Packing Party: Without a Hitch!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 5:03am

  

This past Friday and Saturday, Mike and I had the big Issue Two packing party. We are still so stunned at how incredible it turned out. Readers came up to help from all around Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, and even Maryland. We had just shy of 20 people wrapping a few thousand copies in brown paper and string and attach the wax-sealed tradecards. Every copy was shipped in a rigid mailer with a few pine shavings for an extra touch. 

Check out the full video for the event above!

I would definitely say it was a success. All the pre-orders are in the mail and we have a pile ready for future fulfillment. Everyone worked so hard and really seemed to have a blast doing it. I was of necessity hopping around to many areas while managing the printing of postage but I overheard so much conversation and laughing throughout the two days. The positive and playful atmosphere confirmed in my mind that this is definitely the way to send our magazine out to readers. We are doing it like this next time for sure. If you missed out and want to join in next time, we plan to throw the Issue Three packing party during the last week of November or first week of December 2017. Put it on your calendars, folks. We hope to see you there.

 

One of several van loads to the Post Office!

One of the highlights for me was the show-and-tell time we had on Friday. I asked everyone to bring some work they’ve been doing or tools to show off and, boy, was it fun! George Sawyer brought some super comfy Windsors, Danielle Rose Byrd brought bowls, there were axes, books, etc. It was all so amazing see the excitement around craftwork in general and the mutual encouragement around each other’s work.

 

My sister-in-law, Hannah, is a catering master so hiring her to organize and prepare food was a no-brainer. Totally delicious stuff, all of it. Dinner both nights was at Barncastle. There was excellent lasagna, wood-fired pizza, and Strong’s superb Soulpatch porter.

After Saturday’s dinner, Mike, Wes, and I drove the supplies through the beginning of a small snow storm to the storage unit. We basically shoved everything into the pitch black unit and planned to deal with it today. We were exhausted, it was very cold, and very dark. (Special Thank You to Wes who arrived half a day early and stayed until that bitter cold end!)

 

Mike and I are grateful from the bottom of our hearts for everyone who came to help. There’s no way we could have done this without you guys. You are amazing all of you: Wes, Steve, Jeremy, George, Danielle, Richard, Ryan, Tanya, Austin, Kerrie, Adam, Paula, Andrea, Hannah, Julia, & Megan.

 

And thank you, readers for your orders! If you’ve ordered Issue Two from our store, it is on it’s way! If you still have yet to order your copy, you can get it here.

Thank you so much, readers. Every single copy you purchase makes it possible for Mike and I to keep this independent publication going. Thank you so much for your support!

Now we sit back and watch our Instagram feeds for readers’ arrivals!

 

- Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Skottbenk i Austefjorden i Volda

Norsk Skottbenk Union - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 3:02am

Det gjekk rykte om ein skottbenk i Austefjorden. Peter Brennvik hadde fått eit tips av Anders Hunnes om ein benk. Skulle dette bli den første registrerte skottbenken på Sunnmøre?

l1050260-kopiDei to bukkane til skottbenken. Foto: S.K.Holmin.

Den 26. november, 2016 for Kåre Løvoll og eg inn i Austefjorden og såg på to bukkar (Anders var også med). Eigaren meinte bukkane var brukt til å legge veggstokkar i for å ta ut mefar til tømring. Han hadde ikkje sett benken i bruk sjølv. Eigaren viste oss dei to bukkane. Han kjende ikkje til og hadde ikkje sett eller funne langbord som høyrde til benken.

Skottbenken

Bukkane er laga av furu, men delen som held saman dei to føtene er av bjørk. Delane har ikkje nøyaktig like mål. Det er litt variasjon på lenge bredde og tjukkleik på dei like delane. Dei er hogd til ut ifrå eit emne for å passe til bukken. Emna har ein del synleg vankant og er fasa på mange kantar.

Stavane står på ein 51-53 cm lang, ca. 12 cm høg og 15,5 cm brei fot. Denne er hogd til og det er hogd ein fas langs kanten på langsidene på oppsida. Den har margen i. Høgda på bukkane, altså lengde på stavane er 81-86 cm høge, ca 11-12 cm breie og 8-9 cm tjukke. Dei er altså ikkje kappa nøyaktig for å ha lik høgde. Det er marg i tre av stavane og ein har margen ut. Stavane står med avstand 7,5 cm på foten. Dei har tappar nede som går gjennom foten og er festa med ein rund trenagle som er 17-18 mm. Tappane på staven 8-9 cm lange (stavens tjukkleik) og 3 cm breie. Dei er runda på kantane. Så tapphola er truleg laga ved å borre to 3 cm store gjennomgåande hol og så hogd ut i mellom. Stavane er nøyaktig tilpassa flata oppå foten.

l1050264

l1050263Stavane har tappar nede som er tappa ned i foten og festa med trenagler. Foto: S.K.Holmin.

For å halde stavane stødig saman er det eit tverrtre av rund bjørk som går gjennom eit tapphol i begge stavane. Tverrtreet er hogd ned til 4”x1” der det skal gjennom slissen. I enden som stikk ut er det laga eit hol og satt i ein trekile som gjer at staven ikkje kan pressast ut. På den eine bukken har tverrtreet fått ein sprekk i enden, så der er det forsterka med ein oppgangsaga bordbit som er tredd inn på og det er satt inn ein lang jernspiker/bolt som kile.

l1050259-kopiBukken med tverrtre av bjørk. Dette går gjennom tapphol i føtene. Eit bord er tredd inn på enden og festa med ein jernspiker/bolt som kile, som forsterkning, sidan tverrtreet har sprukke. Foto: S.K.Holmin.

Det er hogd ut for langborda i øverste delen av staven. Her er det hogd ut 3,5 cm djupt og 4,5 cm ved står att på staven på 8 cm (mål frå ein stav). Frå botn av utfelling for langbord og opp til toppen av stavane er det 24,5 og 25 cm på eine bukken og 22 og 23 cm på den andre bukken. Så om ein har langbord på om lag 25-27 cm høgde (dei treng kanskje ikkje å ha vore paralelle?) kan ein høvle opp til 12” breie bord. Alt etter kor høg meien er på høvelen. Tverrtret som avgrensar kor breidt bord ein kan høvle, ligg om lag 3 cm lavare enn underkant av langbordet.

Føtene står med 7,5 cm mellomrom på foten. Oppe er det 14-15 cm mellomrom etter at det er tatt ut for langborda. Om langborda er 2” tjukke kan ein høvle i underkant av 2” bord i denne benken. Utan langborda får ein plass til ein dryg 5” stokk. Det var ikkje tydlege spor etter festing av langbord på bukkane.

l1050271-kopiDen andre bukken, der tverrtreet er festa med ein trekile. Vi ser også uthogginga for langborda øverst på stavane. Foto: S.K.Holmin.

På begge bukkane er det spikra på ein bordbit på tvers mellom stavane som går litt høgre enn tverrtreet. Det er skåre ut eit hakk i kvar av desse. Det er uklart kva nytte desse har hatt. Kanskje for å kunne bruke bukkane utan langborda og legge veggtømmer på høgkant i bukkane for å ta ut mefar? Det var ikkje synlege slitasjespor etter dette. Bordbitane er dessutan montert slik at ein kan ha på langborda også. På eine staven er det fora på litt med ei treflis i botn av utfellinga for langbordet for å kome i høgde med bordbiten? Det kan også vere at bordbitane fungerer som ei ekstra avstiving etter at bukkane har vorte slarkete. Bordbitane er oppgangsaga material og spikra med klippspiker.

Om nokon skal lage seg skottbenk på Sunnmøre kan denne vere ein fin modell. Det har truleg vore brukt kilar for å feste bordet i benken, sidan det ikkje er skruar på den. Det er sjeldan å finne originale løysingar på dette. Vi har funne få benkar med originale kilar. Så her må vi ha augene opne, kanskje det dukkar opp fleire skottbenker med langbord og kilar.

Tusen takk til Olav og Anders for triveleg møte.

Og takk til Peter som vidareformidla tipset, og Kåre som vart med.

 

 

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Høvelstopp av tre

Høvelbenk - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 3:12pm
 Richard Arnold, EnglandHøvelstopp av tre og tilhøyrande høvelbenk. Foto: Richard Arnold, England

Eg er ein av dei som følgjer den engelske snikkaren Richard Arnold Instagram. Når han nyleg la ut eit bilete av ein høvelstopp av tre og ein gamal høvelbenk så kunne eg ikkje la vere å kopiere biletet hans. Høvelbenken som vi berre ser litt av har eit firkanta hol for høvelstoppen som er av tre. Dette er ein type som finnast lite av her i Norden, men er meir vanleg på ein del av dei benkane som er laga etter førebilete frå eldre franske og engelske benkar. Vi har eit døme på eit par slike firkanta hol som dette på den eine høvelbenken på Skokloster. Der kan det ha sete ein liknande høvelstopp som denne gamle engelske på biletet. Ein artig detalj er at snikkaren som har høvla til høvelstoppen har arbeidd strukturert og har merka det rette hjørnet mellom rett flate og vinkla kant. Blyantmerka etter dette er enda synlege på høvelstoppen.

Her er det Richard Arnold skriv om høvelstoppen på si posting av biletet på Instagram:

“Distant memories, long forgotten workshops…… I sometimes find it hard to be objective when I get the rare chance to study something like this long abandoned joiners workshop. You can take all the photo’s, take notes, make meticulous drawings, but most of the time I end up just listening to ghosts. I almost felt guilty removing this bench stop. It had probably not been disturbed for more than 60 years. I wondered who used it last, who took the trouble to mark that face and edge mark?. Each of the scars on that bench top are recordings, or memories of a time lost in the past……. #handtoolthursday #oldtools #workbench #workshop”


Arkivert under:1800-tal, Benkehake, Gamle bilete av snikkarverkstader
Categories: Hand Tools

Split Top Review 3.1 Update on the Veritas Inset Vise and other questions

Billy's Little Bench - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 8:48am

​Another quick update on the workbench. 
I do believe I developed an easy fix and improvement for the Veritas Inset Vise, and I added some drawers to the bench. And .......... Nicholson VS Roubo?????       I'll address that too. 

Categories: Hand Tools

Burn-free Edges

360 WoodWorking - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 3:30am
Burn-free Edges

One of the things that gets under the skin of most woodworkers is when a part comes off the saw with a black-marred edge. It’s a burn made by the blade rubbing the board. Most times you can see an arcing pattern in the darkened defect. How do you make cuts with your table saw that produces burn-free edges?

Step one is to make sure that your saw is set up properly, that your fence does not toe-in.

Continue reading Burn-free Edges at 360 WoodWorking.

really old lady

Old Ladies - Pedder's blog - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 1:26am
I'v got an pm on the english forum:

Regarding your 'Really old saw', The name on the blade is actually 'E J Birch', not Biren. Birch (actually a tree, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birch ) is a common family name in England. Kentish Town is a district of North London, hence the 'NW' on the plate, which was the postal district in those days.

According to Simon Barley, they were tool retailers, not makers. They were probably a big enough retailer for manufacturers to stamp their name on the plate. In businesss from 1875 to about 1905. Weedington Road is still in existence.

It's hard to say who made the saw; there won't be a makers stamp, though you may arrive at an idea by comparing the shape and style of the handle with known manufacturers. Looking at the shape of the lower section of the handle, without a pronounced lower horn or other embellishments to the shape I would hazard a guess that it was what was termed 'second quality' aimed at the mass market. There are some users' name stamps on the handle which may become clearer with a little cleaning.

All best wishes from Wales


I had an old beast in the shop. I think more than 140 years. No pitting.
E.J. Birch.
28"
Pitch changing between 2,5 and 4,5 tpi

Ich hatte Besuch von einer alten Dame
E.J.Birch
70cm lang
Zahnweite irgendwo zwischrn 6 mm und 9 mm.
Ich schätze mehr als 140 Jahre alt . Keine Schäden.

I let the Patina sit there. Die Gebrauchspuren wollte ich nicht entfernen.
Categories: Hand Tools

Customer Projects

David Barron Furniture - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 9:50am

Matt from Indiana sent me these photos of his first projects using a 1:6 magnetic guide.
The dovetail alignment board was made from apple ply, dovetailing this is no easy task, but it should remain nice and stable.

His first piece was this tiny money box made from curly ash and walnut with a mother of pearl pull. 


Nathan produced 11 sets of these coasters styled after a Paul Sellers project. A lot of work there!
I'm guessing a few ended up in Christmas stockings.


The quarter sawn mahogany was definitely a good choice to help keep them flat over time.


Categories: Hand Tools

Sobering up in the New Year.

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 7:40am

I may have mentioned in a previous post that my wife and I picked up two pieces of furniture for my daughter, a chest of drawers and a bed-side table, at an antique store a few months back. The antique store is local, local enough to where it’s easy to just drop by a few times per month, and luckily we happened to wander in to see what was new and discovered the pieces there.

Firstly, the furniture isn’t “antique” in the sense that it is ancient. I would estimate both pieces were made roughly 75 years ago. I know that both the dresser and table were made in Pennsylvania because the faded makers mark is still on the back of both, I just cannot make out the manufacturer. It is extremely well made stuff, solid maple casing, dovetailed drawers and case sides (the chest of drawers case sides), all poplar innards. Knowing what I know about furniture, I would estimate that a similar chest of drawers “new” would likely cost around $900-$1000, possibly more, and the table in the $350 range. We paid just around $180 total for both pieces including tax. So why is the price important? The answer to that question needs some background information.

Some time ago I wrote a post which asked the question: If some sort of theoretical disaster were approaching, and you either save the furniture you made or your woodworking tools, which would you save? Firstly, this question was meant to by hypothetical. This wasn’t meant to be a real world scenario and I wasn’t interested in the logistics of saving both.

What it all boiled down to is: Are your tools more important to you or is the furniture you build with those tools the most important thing? There was no lesson to be learned, I just wanted opinions.

Of the dozen or so people who commented, to a man they all said they would save their tools over their built furniture. And I felt the same way.

I wrote that post a few years ago, and my views regarding the subject haven’t changed too much. And in fact, I can confirm that many people share the same sentiment, because often times when entering a place such as a flea market, or antique store, vintage tools often cost more than vintage/antique furniture, even tools that look like hell compared to furniture that looks great. Of course there are exceptions, and certain pieces of furniture sell for large sums. But, more often than not, even “valuable” furniture sells at auctions for pennies on the dollar. Why?

Here is something I’ve discovered in the time since I first began to woodwork: most furniture is worthless. I don’t care if it was handcrafted, or machine made, or a little of both. I’ve found (though this is hardly a new idea) that furniture often becomes a burden to the owners, and worse than a burden to the people who inherit it. To put that in perspective, the two pieces of well-made furniture we purchased for my daughter were likely once part of a bedroom set, and the original owner, I would think, was probably proud to have them in his/her house. They were likely sold as a ‘lot’ at an estate auction or some such sale after the owners died, or sold their house, or whatever the case may be. Less than 100 years later, within a lifetime if you will, they ended up at the back of a dinky little antique store, priced to sell so the store could make room for more stuff. They were essentially given away even though their ‘intrinsic’ value was theoretically more than double the cost that I paid for them, and many times more than the dealer paid.

As I said, there are high-end antique stores that sell both expensive furniture and tools. I’m not denying that. But well-made, “middle class” furniture costs next to nothing on the pre-owned market. And I’m not referring to mass market stuff, I’m not bringing up IKEA or places like that. I’m talking about the very good quality furniture that the average person had in his or her home 75-100 years ago. While not claiming to be a furniture expert, I know more than enough to recognize a well-constructed piece of furniture, and the stuff I’ve been coming across is extremely well made, and it is selling for “cheap”.

Here is the sobering news: This isn’t a market anomaly. I’ve been in dozens of antique stores and in general you can get good quality furniture without spending much, and at auctions it can get even more crazy. And all of this makes me wonder, wonder about what I do with my time and what woodworking means to me.

For the record, I don’t make furniture to sell it, or in the hopes that it will one day become valuable in a monetary sense. But it dawned on me that there is a  chance that some of the furniture I made may end up having a dollar value placed on it, not so much because it will be sold, but because that “dollar value” may decide if it is worth keeping.  Or it could very well end up at an auction or an estate sale of some kind. It most likely won’t sell for much, if anything at all. Don’t misunderstand me; I make my furniture as well as I can using sound, time-tested methods. But that really doesn’t mean much with the realization that much of the furniture I have built or will build in the future will probably end up in the garbage.

The standard response I will probably get is: “Then strive to build stuff that won’t get tossed aside!!” My reply is that I already try. I can also point out that the vaunted furniture makers of yesteryear, the fellows who made some of the best furniture ever produced; the fellows that the experts tell us are far, far better than we could ever hope to be, built a lot of stuff that ended up in the garbage too, not because it was garbage, but it became garbage nonetheless.

In conclusion, I guess what I am trying to get at is the whole “make stuff that will outlast you” is all nonsense, because it will not. It is rare to find furniture more than 200 years old. Most furniture 300 years old or more is in a museum, and in some cases not just because it was well-made furniture, but because it belonged to somebody of historical importance. The stuff older than 400 years is relatively non-existent.

I know I’m going to get some responses pointing out “all of the antique furniture” that is still out there. Yeah, there is still a lot of antique furniture, a boat load of it, tons, but it is a miniscule amount when comparing it to all of the furniture made at the same time that no longer exists, or still does exist in the back of somebody’s storage basement. And all of the stuff that is still out there is worth little in a monetary sense when it really comes down to it. And here again, I am not trying to put a cash value on what I make, I’m trying to say that just because one of my grandkids may one day have a table I made sitting under a sheet in his or her attic doesn’t mean that I built a piece of furniture that “outlasted me”.

Furniture, like most things, is perishable. It is a fleeting object made by those doomed to die and fade into obscurity. Rest assured, I’m not preaching doom and gloom. I’m saying that working under the pretense of “it outlasting me” may be a losing proposition. I’m not advocating slapping together garbage out of wood and calling it furniture, but I am advocating the end of the high and mighty notion that our furniture is oh so important in the grand scheme of things.

Build furniture; build it the best way you know how, and most importantly have fun, but sooner, or later, nearly everything we make, no matter how lovely or well-made it may be, will likely end up being sold at a yard sale, or covered in dust in somebody’s attic, or gracing the bottom of a land fill. And that is a very sobering thought.


Categories: General Woodworking

Marking, cutting, and mortise gauges, part 5

Heartwood: Woodworking by Rob Porcaro - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 10:34pm
mortise gauge
Unlike the almost all of the cutting and marking gauges discussed in the previous four installments of this series of posts, mortise gauges generally do not have either scribing point at the end of the stem. To gain better visibility of the marking action, I prefer to push a mortise gauge. In use, tilt the […] 6
Categories: Hand Tools

Antique Furniture Forensics

WPatrickEdwards - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 2:27pm
One of the reasons that antique furniture is less and less appreciated these days is that few people are left in the business who are "experts" with real "experience" in the field.

40 years ago, when I travelled the country, stopping in every antique shop I could find in every town, I would usually find a dealer in the shop who was an expert in something.  It might be porcelain, silver, art, carpets, books, tools or furniture.  I learned a great deal from those dealers.  They would take the time to explain as much as they knew about what they were selling.

As I gathered data on the regional characteristics of American 19th century furniture, I would pointedly ask "what furniture do you have in the store which was made locally and what features can you identify that prove your theory?"  I gained a real understanding of what made Texan furniture different from Tennessee or Connecticut from Ohio.  Everywhere I went was an education.

A terrible transformation occurred over the next few decades, as individual dealers either retired or closed their stores, due to less demand and more expensive overhead.  What took the place of the owner operated stand alone antique store was the "antique mall."  This new marketing venue was a direct result of the success of yard sales and flea markets, where less knowledgeble sellers would offer items of unknown origin to bargain hunters.  Each mall was managed by a single person at the front, and walking through these "stores" was as miserable and disappointing as you might think.

Each seller would rent a stall and fill it with junk.  After all, it was cheaper than renting a storage unit, and there was always the possibility that someone would want to buy something.  If you, as a shopper, found something interesting you would take it to the front desk and make the purchase.  The manager or sales clerk knew absolutely nothing about the item.  Only which stall and how much.

There was no possibility of learning anything.

Over time, even these pitiful excuses for antique stores became obsolete.  They have been replaced by online sites like Craig's list and eBay.

Antique buyers need help.  I have always believed in educating clients and prospective collectors about the process of understanding how early hand made (pre industrial) furniture was made.  One of the methods is to have lectures, with examples that students can examine and touch.

For over 30 years I have been associated with Nancy Martin, ASA.  Her career began in science, as did mine, and we think alike.  Always looking for evidence, details and facts which can be used to identify the specific origin of an objects.  Looking at tool marks, construction features, wood analysis, hardware, and other materials provides the best basis for determining the origin.  It can be a fake, a reproduction, or an antique that is original or repaired.  It is not always obvious but careful examination will ultimately provide sufficient evidence to indicate the proper date and origin.

Next month I will again be sharing the podium with Nancy Martin.  We are jointly teaching an ASA class for appraisers at the Huntington Library in San Marino.  ASA members as well as non-members are welcome.  Here is the link: Antique Furniture Authentication Presentation

If you are in the Southern California region and wish to learn more about antique furniture in a wonderful environment, send in your reservation.  I hope to see you there.

I guarantee you will learn something useful.
Categories: Hand Tools

Shop Update for 1/6/17: Sawing Plumb

The Renaissance Woodworker - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 7:55am

When Gravity Just Isn’t Enough, Tips to Saw Plumb

Happy New Year everybody. In this week’s update I share a few of the things I turned for Christmas gifts, talk about some vintage tools that were given to me, and show off a wooden square I made for the Apprentice program at The Hand Tool School. I’m pretty proud about that last one. It’s sexy!

Sawing Plumb

Then I address a question from a viewer about how to keep your saw cuts plumb. Here are a few tips covered in the video:

  • Treat the cut as two parts
  • Pay Attention to the reflection
  • Don’t Forget that step back
  • Commit to the cut and use the whole saw plate
  • Start Your Cut on the Push Stroke
Sawing is probably the MOST important hand tool skill you can acquire and improve, so do yourself a favor and spend some time perfecting your technique and making yourself a better woodworker.

If you do nothing else, check out my One Step Sawing Improvement video
Or maybe this video on Ditching the Miter Box.
Or, maybe you want a saw starting exercise?

Did I Miss Anything?

Are you struggling with your saw cuts and keeping them accurate? Let me know how I can help. Better yet, if you have overcome sad sawing disease, I’d love to hear how you did it.

Categories: Hand Tools

Making a Side Table for Books

The Indian DIY & Woodworker - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 3:46am
Frame and Shelves of a Teak side table

There was a time when I would photograph each stage of a project and use them in my blog. Of late, in the rush to complete projects, I find myself neglecting to document each of them properly, which is bad because I often forget what I had learnt or made a mental note of. Maintaining a blog is one way of keeping a record.

My only excuse is the myriad home improvement tasks I have had to tackle this winter. Some of them were pretty major and required working with professional welders, fitters, masons and so on.

I am also at an uncomfortable stage of my woodworking where I think have learnt a lot and yet my work always seems to be so full of imperfections.

I strive to get better but accuracy always seems to elude me and I seem to blunder so often.

I have been working on a side table made entirely of Teak - Burma for the frames and African for the shelves and top. This piece has taken me much longer than anticipated because of a series of mistakes.

My first problem was with the frame; I struggled to get my tenons right. Even a slight twist in them would skew the frame. I had to scrap two stretchers and re-make them.

The bottom shelf was not a problem as I had cut a rebate all around the inside of the stretchers. This allowed the shelf to sit on the rebates without glue or screws. It floats with a small gap of about a sixteenth of an inch all around. Although even here the reveal could have been more consistent than it actually is.

A major blunder was the middle shelf. The shelf was designed to sit inside two housings cut in the insides of the legs. I had intended to glue the front part and leave the back free to expand and contract inside the housing.

Top slab - French Polished

During the glue-up however, I clean forgot and glued the back as well as the front. That unfortunately is something I cannot fix and can only hope the frame will be strong enough to restrain the movement of the shelf.

What I did do is separate the tops and bottoms of the shelf where it sits inside the legs with a flush cut saw. The hope is that if the pressure is too much it would have much less of a glue surface to break free from. Does that make any sense? Perhaps not but it made me feel a little better.

Then, there was the matter of the top. I had laminated four lengths of one and a half inch thick Teak boards to made a slab. It had turned out fine after a lot of hand planing, sanding and French polishing.

Screwing on the top

But when I went to fit it, I found the slab had very little overhang along the sides of the frame. I had goofed up on the measurements. It covered everything but looked bad.

So, it was back to laminating, sanding and polishing. Finished all of that this morning and had the pleasure of finally screwing on the new top to the frame.

For this I had attached three quarter inch pieces to the insides of the top and made elongated holes for the screws.

The Shellac polish looks good though I think it would do better with a wipe of poly for the long term because I am going to use the top for coffee and drinks.

The side table in my study


Indranil Banerjie
6 January 2017
Categories: Hand Tools

A New Project Results In A Goodbye To An Old Friend...

The Part-Time Woodworker - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 12:40am
I always have been able to find something of interest on the Lost Art Press Blog. This time it was a "make it yourself" post for a plane that I have been actually looking to buy these past few months - the Cabinet Makers' Edge Plane.


Stanley made their No. 97 Cabinet Makers' Edge Planes from 1905 to 1943, most of which are now selling for anywhere from $400 to $700. Just for comparison, Lie-Nielsen sells a smaller version of the 97 for $145. Stanley sold their original version for $2.20 in 1909, selling their 2 1/4" replacement blade for a whopping 45¢. 

Depending on the way the blade is situated, it is either a flush-cutting plane or a bullnose smoother. If the blade is set flush with the sole of the plane, it will cut flush all day long. Extend the blade a sliver, and it becomes, according to Christopher Schwarz, a great smoother for blind rabates and stopped chamfers.

I spent a great deal of time these past couple days studying every video I could find on this style of plane and once I figured I had a reasonable idea of how it worked, I set out to design my own.


The original Stanley used the same type of blade adjustment as their 220 block plane, but for mine, I think I'm going to go with a Norris type adjuster. I'm planning to use the same type of lever cap, though. The only other major difference is that my body will be made out of a nice hunk of Rosewood, rather than a casting. This is just a rough layout for this plane, as once I get the 2" blade and the adjuster in my hands, I'll be able to take it further.

To get the required parts, I turned to my usual supplier for all things toolie; Lee Valley. They have 2" lever caps that they use on their Low Angle Smoothing Plane, but they are not listed in their online store so I emailed them to ask if they would sell me one. Whoever I was dealing with said she would speak to the powers that be and get back to me, which she did, telling me they would sell me one for the crazy low price of $14. I was more than pleased.

Originally, I had planned to purchase their "Wooden Bench Plane Hardware Kit", which includes a 2" O1 blade, a short Norris adjuster with seating cap, and the necessary items needed to make a wood lever cap, all for $56, but I noticed a glitch with the adjuster. With the design I was looking at, the short adjuster was just too short. If I used it, I would have to cut away too much of the body to give room for my fingers to get at the knob, so I emailed them again asking if I could purchase their longer Norris type adjuster, the one that they use on their 5 1/4W Bench Plane. This is when the ball of string started to unravel.

Basically, they said no, you can't buy a long one because we have no record of you ever buying a 5 1/4W Bench Plane. I was half expecting this as I ran into their proprietary issues when I was converting an old Delta water stone sharpener into a dry sharpener. This, however, was worse as they were telling me that there was no issue selling me a short adjuster, but damned if they were going to sell me a long one. If I wasn't so pissed, I would have laughed. I told them to basically shove it.

I ordered a Lie-Nielsen 2" blade and bought a Norris type long adjuster on eBay. I also found a couple of lever caps that would work, but I decided to make my own from some brass stock, just to say I have done it. Once the blade and adjuster come in, I'll be able to finalize the design and get to work cutting a hunk of Rosewood that I actually bought from Lee Valley a few years ago. I also bought a package of oval headed brass screws from them as well, one of which will work to hold down the lever cap.

Am I being too bitchy about this? Maybe, but if they could tell me I never bought a 5 1/4W Bench Plane from them, they could also see that I have been a customer of theirs for decades and that I haven't been shy about spending my money with them. It would appear that my loyalty and spending were only worth a short adjuster to them as it appears they are saving their long ones for their real high rollers. Their loss, not mine.

Peace,

Mitchell


Categories: Hand Tools

Card Scraping a Powder Horn with Mark Thomas (Workshop Tour Part 3)

Wood and Shop - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 6:25pm
In this third video, professional engraver and flintlock rifle maker Mark Thomas takes us into his Virginia workshop to share a short tutorial on how to use a card scraper to scrape a Scottish Highland cow horn while making a historical rifle powder horn. If you missed his workshop tour, watch part 1 here. I apologize for

Høvelbenk på Gressåmoen, Snåsa

Høvelbenk - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 2:00pm

Studenten Kai Johansen som går på studiet i tradisjonelt bygghandverk på NTNU i Trondheim har kome over ein gamal høvelbenk på garden Gressåmoen i Snåsa i Nord-Trøndelag. Han har skrive om denne benken på bloggen til studiet. Eg har henta tekst og bilete frå hans bloggpost og gjev det att også her på høvelbenkane sin eige blogg. Kai sin tekst:

Torsdag 18 august tilbragte vi dagen med å handsage bordkledning på Gressåmoen fjellgård i Snåså. Vi testet ut sager, og viste teknikker med øks og handsag for elever fra Mære Landbruksskole.

På gården står det to høvelbenker som har et alderdommelig preg og er helt tydelig lagd lokalt, jeg syns de fortjener en liten omtale da det er langt imellom så gamle benker. Dette er den første av de to benkene på gården. Omtale av andre benken kommer senere.

Høvelbenken på Gressamoen. Den er litt under 2 meter lang og har baktang med midstilt høvelklo med to tangar. Høvelbenken på Gressåmoen. Den er 69 tommar  lang og har baktang med midstilt høvelklo med to tangar.

Benken er lagd i furu med slitedeler i bjørk. Baktang har skruve midt på og høvelklo med to tangar slik vi har sett tidlegare på eldre høvelbenkar av denne typen. Denne gangen fikk jeg ikke tid til å dokumentere fullstendige mål og sammenføyninger, men vi skal tilbake dit. Benken har ingen føtter bevart, men spor etter to generasjoner med faste føtter.

Baktang med høvelklo med to tangar, ein på kvar side av skruven i baktang.Baktang med høvelklo med to tangar, ein på kvar side av skruven i baktang.  Kai JohansenAlle delene er laget i bjørk , her ser man 2 generasjons innfesting av føtter. Foto: Kai Johansen Benkeplata er bare ca 1" tjukk. Den har vore stiva av med to drevsponer som føtene har vore tappa inn i. Benkeplata er bare ca 1″ tjukk. Den har vore stiva av med to drevsponer som føtene har vore tappa inn i. Bredden på benken ca. 10". Innfestningen av 1. generasjons føtter, drevsponsliss og tapphull 1″x3″Bredden på benken ca. 10″. Innfestningen av 1. generasjons føtter, drevsponsliss og tapphull 1″x3″ Undersida av benken.Undersida av benken. Total lengde på benken 69”. "Framtange" med sekundært innfesting av føtter, og bjørkekrok til mulig innfestning?Total lengde på benken 69”. “Framtange” med sekundært innfesting av føtter, og bjørkekrok til mulig innfestning?

8. januar 2008 vart Gressåmoen freda av  Riksantikvaren.
Her er det Riksantikvaren skriver om gården: “GressåmoenAnlegget er eit historisk viktig døme på ein skysstasjon og fjellgard rydda i eit marginalt jordbruksområde. Fredinga omfattar ei rekke bygningar og eit område rundt. Fredinga skal verne Gressåmoen som eit bygningshistorisk og kulturhistorisk viktig døme på ein skysstasjon og fjellgard rydda i eit marginalt jordbruksområde. Fredinga skal dessutan også verne Gressåmoen som uttrykk for samkvemmet mellom bumann og same.”

Kvilestue frå 1600-talet
Gressåmoen gard har vært vurdert som verneverdig sidan tidleg på 1970-talet, då Gressåmoen nasjonalpark blei oppretta. Frå gamalt av gjekk ferdselsvegen mellom Snåsa og Lierne over Gressåmoen. Fordi vegen over fjellet var lang, var behovet for overnattingsstader stort. Gressåmoen ligg midtvegs og var difor ein naturleg stoppestad. Det har truleg stått ei kvilestue her allereie på 1600-talet. Kart både frå 1690 og 1720 viser busetnad på staden. Lenger øst for Gressåmoen tyder namnet Gamstuguhaugen på at det har vore samisk busetnad i området.

Fjellgard frå 1800-talet
I 1797 starta Ole Nilsen Aglerønning rydding av Gressåmo gard, som han fekk kongeskøyte på i 1837. Gressåmoen var ein typisk fjellgard, med store, flate og fine voller, godt beite for dyra, fisk og vilt i vatn og fjell. Jorda er derimot skrinn, og garden måtte difor basere seg på kombinasjonsbruk der utmarksressursane i fjellet var svært viktige.

 


Arkivert under:1700-tal, 1800-tal, 2 meter, Baktang med hake i senter
Categories: Hand Tools

Last Issue From 360 Woodworking

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 1:32pm
Last Issue From 360 Woodworking

Start with a concept of a woodworking magazine. That’s what we did. We then imagined what a magazine could be if we were to start over, re-invent it and make the most of digital publishing technology’s multimedia platform. What if projects and techniques were as long as they needed to be? What if pictures were large enough to see even the smallest details clearly? What if there were plenty of drawings, big enough to show what you want and need to see?

Continue reading Last Issue From 360 Woodworking at 360 WoodWorking.

a fest, a chest, some spoons

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 10:22am

scribing

First off, the Greenwood Fest http://www.greenwoodfest.org/ sold out in just about 1 day.  There are still spaces in several of the pre-fest courses; scroll down on the link to read about those offerings. If you missed a ticket to the fest, do get on the waiting list. June is a long ways off, lots can happen between now & then. Last year, many on the waiting list got in. Maybe all. Thanks to all who support Plymouth CRAFT’s programs, we appreciate it. A special hearty thanks to Paula Marcoux, who runs Plymouth CRAFT, organizes the festival and created the website – and answered every question sent to Plymouth CRAFT …and on & on. The rest of us just goof around, Paula does all the work.

paula

In the workshop, I’m getting prepared for this weekend’s edition of the joined chest class at Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/  I’m going to assemble the chest I’m working on, so the students can see what happens when they get to that step. First, I make a lot of tapered oak pins. Shaved, not driven through a dowel plate. These pins are the most critical part of the joinery. They need to be straight-grained, and cleanly cut.

shaving-pins

And I need a lot of them. I think 56 in this particular chest. Some are already driven; the front is mostly assembled.

still-not-enough

the photo at the top of this post shows me scribing the pin hole on the side rails’ tenons. Here, I’ve knocked those joints apart enough to get in there & bore the holes in the tenons.

boring

Then drive the pins home. driving-pins

The shoulder pulls up nice & tight.

pegged

I’ll cut & fit the till and install the floor during the class. I’ll try to get shots during the weekend.

SPOON-CARVING –

I carved some spoons recently – one a shape I’ve carved many times – here is the new spoon alongside one about 10 years old. Similar shape, one with a nice broken-in feel, the other brand-spankin’-new. Both birch, both flax oil finish. that’s what using them does to them…I like the look of time & use… I think it also helps to know as you’re carving spoons that what the color & grain look like today is not what they will look like down the line.

new-old-spoons

new-old-spoons-rear


Pages

Subscribe to Norse Woodsmith aggregator