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The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

An aggregate of many different woodworking blog feeds from across the 'net all in one place!  These are my favorite blogs that I read everyday...

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The Slant-lid Tool Chest

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 12:19pm

In some Victorian books on woodworking, the author suggests that if you don’t have a shop you could use a chest of drawers as a woodworking bench, tool chest and shaving collector. I’ve not seen an occurrence of this in the wild, but it is an interesting idea. Recently, Will of Texas sent me photos of his tool chest, which is based off a slant-lid desk with banks of drawers […]

The post The Slant-lid Tool Chest appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Sniffle Island

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 12:10pm

I’d planned to go to the office/shop today (Saturday) to work on the personal project that’s been a millstone ’round my neck for months – a kitchen island/microwave stand. But I’ve got a bad case of the chest and sinus crud; the very thought of sawdust makes me cough (even more than I already am). And that’s OK (well, the staying home part – I’d rather not be ill), because […]

The post Sniffle Island appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Added Schematic Drawing for Stanley #71 Router

Paul Sellers - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 12:01pm

Both modern-day makers of the router plane, Veritas and Lie Nielsen, sized their planes to the same or similar footprint of the Stanley  #71 and Record 071 plane. Both makers omitted including the depth rod accessory and adjustable shoe for attaching to the arched front of the plane as in the early make of the plane prior to 1900. Obviously the original maker felt that there was an important enough need for this in the improved model so you may want to consider this when you are looking for a hand router. I have used both types without problems but I do like the depth gauge rod for different applications from time to time and also the ability to use the adjustable shoe for the edges of boards and such. Lie Nielsen offers a flat soled router plane and the split soled model emulating the Stanley version of the 71, but of course this means buying two models. Its easier to add the wooden sole and of course costs almost nothing whichever plane or maker type you buy. Having said that, there isn’t provision for screwing a wooden sole to the plane but I surmise that you could use the slot used for adjusting the fence. I would use cheese- or dome-head setscrews and thread the wooden board to do this.

The repeat of the text from the Stanley #71 Router pamphlet from my previous blog yesterday is added because I reproduced a drawing with keys to identify the components parts to the plane.

Stanley router plane No 71

For surfacing the bottom of grooves or other depressions parallel to the surface of the work. There are many applications in pattern making, cabinet work and in fact almost all kinds if woodworking that call for these tools.They are particularly practical for routing dadoes for shelves, stair stringers or where pieces of hardware are to be recessed into the surface or edge of a board, such as large hinges or lock strikes, etc. It is not possible to show all these, but the user will discover places where the tools will prove their value.

CUTTERS-Cutters are made of high grade quality steel and are hardened and tempered. The shanks of the cutters are graduated in 1/16ths for 1″ which makes it possible to reverser for duplicate work and for approximate depth adjustments. Three cutters (N) are furnished, 1/4″ and 1/2″ router cutters and a (3 piece) “V” or smoothing cutter. Cutters are adjustable and depending on type of work can be held on front and back of cutter post (D) by means of clamp (H) and clamp thumbscrew (G).

VERTICAL ADJUSTMENT OF CUTTERS-To adjust cutter to desired depth, loosen thumbscrew  (G), turn adjusting screw nut (B) up or down on adjusting screw (C), and tighten thumbscrew.

SHOE-A shoe (F) for closing the throat is provided for use on narrow work if a closed throat is practical and is fastened to depth gauge rod (A) by means of the shoe thumbscrew (E).

DEPTH GAUGE ROD-This rod (A), fastened by means of thumbscrew (O), may be used to control the depth of each cut, preventing the cutter from taking an excessive cut which would be inconvenient. For example, a cut 1/16″ deep can be cut repeatedly while still allowing the cutter to be set for the final depth of cut. One end of the rod is of small diameter for following in a small groove.

FENCE-An adjustable fence (L) is provided for use where the cutter is to run parallel to an edge. One side of the fence is designed for straight work while the other side is for curved work. Fence may be fastened to either left or right side of working face of plane bottom (K) by means of fence fastening screw and washer (M).

KNOB-The two hardwood knobs (J) are fastened to plane bottom by means of knob bolt and nut (I).

Schematic of Stanley #71 Router plane.

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Router plane on wide housing.

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The photo shows how to rout openings wider than the plane bottom (should read wider than half the plane bottom). The attachment of a flat board to the plane bottom is the simplest way to span large openings. The plane bottom is provided with screw holes for attaching such boards as necessary.

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Here is shown a common job in home construction where this plane can be used – routing the stringer for the step and riser of a staircase. The other pictures show a stopped dado and a routed shape for an inset.

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The post Added Schematic Drawing for Stanley #71 Router appeared first on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Chevalet Progress

McGlynn On Making - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 11:08am

I’ve been grabbing little snatches of time this week, making progress on the Marquetry Chevalet.  Unfortunately, there isn’t much to show for it.  Lots of dimensioning 8/4 rough sawn stock and laminating it to make thicker beams.

Generally, my parts are thinner than what is shown in the plans.  By the time I get the 8/4 stock flat and glued up it’s not thick enough.  I don’t think it’s a big deal really, certainly not worth the waste to add another layer of 8/4.  I hope.  We’ll see…

Great big blocks of Sapele, oozing Titebond III

Great big blocks of Sapele, oozing Titebond III

I have all the parts for the beam to support the saw glued up, and the parts for the saw frame itself rough dimensioned and “acclimating”.  I need the horizontal beam for the saw support done to finish the work on the front upright.  And I need my 14 year old to get out of bed so he can support the end of the upright while I cut the S-curve on the bandsaw.  And to do his homework, wish me luck…

 


Categories: General Woodworking

Where H.O. Studley Shopped

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 10:15am

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While a fair number of tools in the H.O. Studley chest were custom-made – most likely by Studley himself – there are a significant number of off-the-rack tools in the chest as well. Lots of Starrett stuff, Brown & Sharpe, Stanley and Buck Bros.

Based on two of the backsaws in the chest, we know that Studley bought them from Chandler & Barber, a well-known ironmonger in Boston that supplied tools for work in metal, iron, wood and leather. The company also was renowned for supplying tools for schools teaching Sloyd and the North Bennet Street school.

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In fact, there is a lot written about Chandler & Barber that our researchers have uncovered, but what we don’t have is a Chandler & Barber catalog from the early 20th century. We haven’t turned up a full catalog of the hardware company’s wares that relate to woodworking tools. We’ve got some pages and snippets, but not a full catalog.

If you have a catalog in your collection and would like to help our last bit of research for “Virtuoso: The Tool Cabinet and Workbench of H.O. Studley,” could you please send a message to Don Williams?

(Yes, we know that Chandler & Barber didn’t manufacture the saws and that they are private label from another maker.)

In the meantime, enjoy these shots of the blade etches on two of Studley’s backsaws and a photo of the display cases at Chandler & Barber’s store on Summer Street in Boston.

— Christopher Schwarz

P.S. And if you have a photo of Don Williams speaking during the first Roubo Society dinner at Woodworking in America in Covington, Ky., we would love a copy!

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Filed under: Virtuoso: The Toolbox of Henry O. Studley
Categories: Hand Tools

Stanley #65 type 1 restoration

time tested tools - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 10:05am

 

This is a recent restoration of a type 1 Stanley #65. According to Virginia Tool Works this would have been manufactured in 1898 through 1900.

 

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Most folks are more familiar with the later type #65 with a knuckle cap and adjustable mouth.

The knuckle cap actually didn’t start until 1913.

The adjustable mouth came about in 1905.

 

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Categories: Hand Tools

Anarchy & Beauty

Hackney Tools - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 9:28am

The forthcoming exhibition at The National Portrait Gallery put me in mind this week of Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement. I’m looking forward to having a look round this show. In east London, we are also very lucky to have the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow, (William Morris was born in Walthamstow). We took the family there last year and the whole gallery is superbly done out, with very clear signage, things to do for the kids and items you will probably never see anywhere else, such as original wooden printing blocks that Morris used to build up his complex wallpaper designs.
Well, They say it always comes in threes, so as I ducked into a local charity shop last week to escape the London rain, I saw this book on sale for a princely £2.50 and snapped it up.

'Arts & Crafts in Britain and America', by Isabelle Anscombe and Charlotte Gere.

‘Arts & Crafts in Britain and America’, by Isabelle Anscombe and Charlotte Gere.

If you can find a copy of ‘Arts & Crafts in Britain and America‘ and are interested in the Arts & Crafts era I thoroughly recommend you buy it. The book explains how the movement was born, with industrialisation, religion, socialist ideals and many other factors all coming together to forge a new way of thinking about craft. Morris’s idea of promoting ‘fitness for purpose’ would be well suited to today’s modern age I think. And it is very evident that people are once again finding pleasure in craft that feeds the soul and reflects the honest labour of the sole maker and not wholly the industrial process.
(All captions and pictures are taken from the book and remain copyright of the publisher).

Page from Morris and Co. catalogue, c.1910.

Page from Morris and Co. catalogue, c.1910.

Page of chairs from Morris and Co. catalogue, c.1910. These chairs were produced throughout the whole of the firm's existence, and copied by many other firms, notably Heal and Sons.

Page of chairs from Morris and Co. catalogue, c.1910. These chairs were produced throughout the whole of the firm’s existence, and copied by many other firms, notably Heal and Sons.

Left page - Louis C. Tiffany - Group of iridescent glasses, 1900-1912. Below - Louis C. Tiffany - Panel of stained glass designed for a garden room, c.1900

Left page – Louis C. Tiffany – Group of iridescent glasses, 1900-1912. Below – Louis C. Tiffany – Panel of stained glass designed for a garden room, c.1900

 Below right - 'Cray' chintz, 1884.

Top Edward Burne Jones – Tapestry hanging, one of the series of the ‘Holy Grail’, designed for Stanmore Hall and woven at Merton Abbey, 1894. Below left – Morris & Co. – ‘Blackthorn’ wallpaper, 1892: Below right – ‘Cray’ chintz, 1884.

The book cover many firms of the time, Gillow, James Lamb of Manchester, Holland & Son to name but a few, but also gives excellent accounts of the individual makers who pushed the movement forward. Mostly associated with Morris, they developed styles of decoration or ‘free styles’, as they were known. Often with references to nature, items were usually designed with the material in mind to show it to best effect. The movement transformed glass making, furniture, silverware and later progressed via stores like Liberty of London or Heals, to be widely available to the public.

As makers got busier and the ideals of socialism as strong as ever, we saw a rise in the establishment of ‘guilds’, co-operatives designed to support and the maker and to provide a natural symbiosis with makers who could provide, say, iron work for a wooden furniture maker. People like Ernest Gimson therefore found themselves making the metalwork for the furniture designs of Sidney Barnsley, for example.

Sidney Barnsley - Details of walnut wardrobe with metalwork by Ernest Gimson. Commissioned for Lady Waterlow, c.1905.

Sidney Barnsley – Details of walnut wardrobe with metalwork by Ernest Gimson. Commissioned for Lady Waterlow, c.1905.

Ernest Gimson - Cabinet on a stand, the door panels inset with pierced gesso ornaments, c.1910.

Ernest Gimson – Cabinet on a stand, the door panels inset with pierced gesso ornaments, c.1910.

Left - Louis Sullivan - Door handle and finger plate, cast bronze, Guaranty building, Buffalo, 1894-5. Right - Louis Sullivan - Ornamental ironwork from the front of Carson, Pirie, Scott store, Chicago, 1899.

Left – Louis Sullivan – Door handle and finger plate, cast bronze, Guaranty building, Buffalo, 1894-5.
Right – Louis Sullivan – Ornamental ironwork from the front of Carson, Pirie, Scott store, Chicago, 1899.

Top left - Gustav Stickley - Oak music cabinet, c.1910-12. Top right - Roycroft workshops - Oak magazine pedestal, showing Roycroft mark, c.1912. Below - Gustav Stickley - Oak trestle table, Craftsman Workshops, c.1912. This table was not the standard size trestle and was perhaps made to order.

Top left – Gustav Stickley – Oak music cabinet, c.1910-12. Top right – Roycroft workshops – Oak magazine pedestal, showing Roycroft mark, c.1912. Below – Gustav Stickley – Oak trestle table, Craftsman Workshops, c.1912. This table was not the standard size trestle and was perhaps made to order.

By 1852 those same ideals based on ‘regularity is beauty’ and ‘beauty rests on utility’ were thriving in the US through the Shaker community, although towards 1860 the US started to follow the style of the English Arts and Crafts. Makers such as the German, Daniel Pabst in Philadelphia rose up through the ranks, as indeed did Gustav Stickley of Syracuse, New York. He later become the foremost proponent of the movement in the US and his furniture is now widely collected.

What was most interesting to me was that a lot of these makers, particularly Gimson, ended up purely designing pieces and not having a hand in the actual making of them. It seemed to me that things went full circle and as short-run production pieces came into being for the likes of Liberty, it perhaps wasn’t too far away from the industrialisation the makers had fought so hard to get away from.
Something today’s artisan’s and makers still struggle with, the need to make enough money to enable you to carry on doing what you want to do.

The Guild of Handicraft - The metalwork shop at Essex House, photo before 1902.

The Guild of Handicraft – The metalwork shop at Essex House, photo before 1902.

Categories: Hand Tools

Woodworkers Fighting Cancer 2014 Campaign

Matt's Basement Workshop - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 9:00am

It’s that time of year again: the 2014 Woodworkers Fighting Cancer fundraiser brought to us by The Wood Whisperer Team of Marc & Nicole Spagnuolo.

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In 2013 Woodworkers Fighting Cancer raised over $14,000. This year the goal is $15,000 and The Wood Whisperer Team is confident they’ll reach it.

Over the past few years Woodworkers Fighting Cancer have built a number of fun projects in the name of fundraising to find a cure for one of the most insidious diseases we’ve faced…CANCER.

Projects ranging from a shaker side table, to a rocking horse, and then last year’s child art easel. Along the way, hundreds of woodworkers have participated and shared their versions with the online community.

This year the project is a cool little toy chest, and all proceeds are once again going to the Cancer Research Institute. The official plans for it was released yesterday so if you want to get started right away to help hit that $15,000 goal visit the Woodworkers Fighting Cancer page at www.woodworkersfightingcancer.com.

Thanks for participating and more importantly, have fun in the shop while doing something to make a difference!

Help support the show – please visit our advertisers

Categories: Hand Tools

The Anti-Roy

The Furniture Record - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:24pm

I have been anxious about all the conflict and flux in the woodworking universe. To help calm myself, I went out seeking woodworking comfort food.

Klingspor is a global abrasives manufacturing company with an American division. This division has three retail woodworking stores in North Carolina. They are having their 14th annual Woodworking Extravaganza a third of the state away in Hickory, NC. It has all the usual extravaganza stuff, various manufacturers, demonstrations, competitions and lots of sandpaper. They sell roll ends, surplus, discontinued products. Boxes and boxes of the stuff. I am still working through my box of sheet sandpaper bought three or four years ago.

This year there was the added attraction of the (in)famous Scott Phillips. For those not familiar with Mr. Phillips, he has been the host of Public Television’s The American Woodshop for 17 years. This is a little unusual in that Mr. Phillips has been associated with Woodcraft. In North Carolina and on-line, Klingspor is a competitor of Woodcraft’s. Who knows how relationships in corporate America work.

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Watching Scott work, I realized that there are some differences between Scott and the legendary Roy Underhill. The obvious one is that Roy eschews the use of power tools while Scott embraces them. Sometimes while they are running. Roy has studied and is a practitioner of traditional methods and techniques. Scott is not bound by tradition and is willing to stretch and experiment with ideas on the use and application of tools. Scott is a pioneer and I do not think we will see his like again.

There are similarities between the two. Both are entertainers and know how to work a room. Both are passionate about their woodworking. Neither is afraid of hard work. During a demonstration, Scott realized the Kreg Foreman was not plugged in. He didn’t raise a fuss and demand that someone fix it. He humbly crawled under the table and plugged it in. I also have never Roy ask anyone to plug-in any of his tools.

While I was there, Mr. Phillips was showcasing the year’s best new woodworking product. As luck would have it, the manufacturers of the best new products all had booths there. It just goes to show that Klingspor only invited the best manufacturers to their show.

Scott Phillips demonstrating the best new products.

Scott Phillips demonstrating the best new products.

A few years back, I had the chance to talk to Mr. Phillips at a Cincinnati Woodcraft the day before Woodworking in America opened. I think he really does understand his place in the woodworking firmament. He views himself as the guy that demonstrates that anyone can woodwork. He tries to keep things simple and fun. Many of us watch his show and roll our eyes. I don’t think those who do are his target audience. His show is always entertaining although perhaps not for the intended reasons.

It’s a living…


How Our Museum Got Screwed

The Workbench Diary - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 8:08pm

The other day I was over at the Fisher House giving a tour and noticed something wooden shoved behind the door collecting dust. I pulled it out and found it was an early 19th century double screw vise. Astounded and alarmed I inquired about its story. They told me it just showed up one day on the doorstep along with a couple of bucksaws. No one ever left a note or called to tell us why they gave it to the museum. (This kind of stuff happens more than you’d think.) Was it Fisher’s double screw a local resident had? I guess it’s possible but we will never know until the donor fills us in. This was dropped off quite a while ago so the likelihood we’ll ever find out is slim I think.


Regardless, the vise is cool. 18” between screws. I think they are 1” screws. There are hand wrought nails that were driven through the back jaw for mounting  to a workbench presumably. I don’t know what the museum is going to do with it but I think it’s a cool find.



Categories: Hand Tools

I Found Out the Hard Way…

The Alaska Woodworker - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:31pm
..that the pin on a half mortise chest lock is not in the center of the lock! The lock is centered, but the escutcheon is not!  Perhaps I should have read Glen Huey’s blog before I installed the lock.  Oh well he found out the same way!  Of course I used a router plane to […]
Categories: Hand Tools

Fitting Fake Drawer Fronts for the 2nd Top

She Works Wood - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:19pm
One of the last thing is to make false for the 2nd top section on the TV Lift Cabinet.  It’s pretty straight forward but fun to do.
Categories: General Woodworking

Unpacking the #71 Router – Last Post Part III

Paul Sellers - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 12:54pm

DSC_0128 - Version 3Unpacking the hand router is always a favourite of mine because the tool is one of the most essential tools in hand tool woodworking. Routing recesses and levelling the reception areas for inlays can be almost impossible without them and they far exceed recessing with power routers when it comes to personal and project safety. Let’s plummet the depths a little more at the attributes of the #71 (same as Record #071) hand router developed by Stanley Tool and Level in the last two decades of the 1800s.DSC_0129

Today I worked to give better examples of the tool in use, to show a little more of its substantial merit in the trade for nigh on 130 years. Running the two makers, Stanley and Record (of old), side by side you quickly see that these tools are essentially the same and even some of the parts are interchangeable between the makers. Not all the threads on the set and thumbscrews are the same so watch for that if you are buying to add to an opposite maker.

DSC_0079Chiseling out recesses becomes very accurate with a hand router and of course it’s as fast if not faster than setting up power routers for most operations outside of making a thousand.

In this situation I use the router on the wooden base board to to delineate the depth for a hinge recess.

DSC_0061By using the flap of the hinge as the definitive depth directly to the router blade I can get pin point accuracy right from the start. DSC_0067I then mark the depth directly onto the wood in between the width lines that show the position of the hinge.

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After that I chisel the knife wall at the hinge width to deepen the walls and then adjust the depth of cut in the router to remove the waste in incremental depths of about 1mm (almost but not quite 1/32”).

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The recess is ultra smooth and within one thou of an exact overall depth. Translate this into inlay recesses and you start to understand the real value (and safety) in using the hand router and with the wooden sole attached it feels the same advantage all wooden planes have over all metal ones but with the added micro adjustment that makes the work dead-on accurate. Above you can see the steps in hinge recessing with the router.

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I created a double-depth recess on this one within four knife walls and then a hardware recess of the type you might use for extra support for strength.

 

Chiseling the bulk of the waste saves too much setting and resetting and gets you to final depth very quickly.

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The original Stanley Tool pamphlet that came in the box with the tool is given lastly below, but I added ital and colour for clarity between my work and Stanley. You can work out the parts by the visual look at the pictures. In the pamphlet Stanley have coded the text with Capped letters.

In my last blog on this I talked of the spanning of areas wider than half the plane worth to rout out wider indentations that would otherwise be more difficult. If the cutting iron is well prepped the surface recessed will be as smooth as a planed surface.

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For tenons the hand router beats even the shoulder plane for accuracy and smoothness.

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Here you can see the exactness of the surfaces and the alignment with the gauge lines. I have been making a table alongside the class today and all of my tenons look like the one shown and all are interchangeable with the same tightness of fit.

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Here is a feature not to obvious at first. Using the back our outboard face of the blade mount gives more access into otherwise inaccessible areas bullnose fashion as in this recess were it up against another board.

Wording from the original Stanley pamphlet accompanying the #71 router plane:

Stanley Router Plane No 71

For surfacing the bottom of grooves or other depressions parallel to the surface of the work. There are many applications in pattern making, cabinet work and in fact almost all kinds if woodworking that call for these tools.They are particularly practical for routing dadoes for shelves, stair stringers or where pieces of hardware are to be recessed into the surface or edge of a board, such as large hinges or lock strikes, etc. It is not possible to show all these, but the user will discover places where the tools will prove their value.

CUTTERS-Cutters are made of high grade quality steel and are hardened and tempered. The shanks of the cutters are graduated in 1/16ths for 1″ which makes it possible to reverser for duplicate work and for approximate depth adjustments. Three cutters (N) are furnished, 1/4″ and 1/2″ router cutters and a (3 piece) “V” or smoothing cutter. Cutters are adjustable and depending on type of work can be held on front and back of cutter post (D) by means of clamp (H) and clamp thumbscrew (G).

VERTICAL ADJUSTMENT OF CUTTERS-To adjust cutter to desired depth, loosen thumbscrew  (G), turn adjusting screw nut (B) up or down on adjusting screw (C), and tighten thumbscrew.

SHOE-A shoe (F) for closing the throat is provided for use on narrow work if a closed throat is practical and is fastened to depth gauge rod (A) by means of the shoe thumbscrew (E).

DEPTH GAUGE ROD-This rod (A), fastened by means of thumbscrew (O), may be used to control the depth of each cut, preventing the cutter from taking an excessive cut which would be inconvenient. For example, a cut 1/16″ deep can be cut repeatedly while still allowing the cutter to be set for the final depth of cut. One end of the rod is of small diameter for following in a small groove.

FENCE-An adjustable fence (L) is provided for use where the cutter is to run parallel to an edge. One side of the fence is designed for straight work while the other side is for curved work. Fence may be fastened to either left or right side of working face of plane bottom (K) by means of fence fastening screw and washer (M).

KNOB-The two hardwood knobs (J) are fastened to plane bottom by means of knob bolt and nut (I).

Drawing of schematic of plane here.

Drawing of plane on wide housing here.

The illustration shows how to rout openings wider than the plane bottom (should read wider than half the plane bottom). The attachment of a flat board to the plane bottom is the simplest way to span large openings. The plane bottom is provided with screw holes for attaching such boards as necessary.

Drawing of options for use, plane and plane parts and assembled plane here.

Here is shown a common job in home construction where this plane can be used – routing the stringer for the step and riser of a staircase. The other piece shows a stopped dado and a routed shape for an inset.

The post Unpacking the #71 Router – Last Post Part III appeared first on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Pre-publication Sale of The Spinning Wheel Repair Book

Full Chisel by Stephen Shepherd - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 9:51am

I am offering a pre-publication sale on the Spinning Wheel Repair Book which is going to the press soon.  I will be delivering these by the first week of December 2014.

Here is a mock up of the cover, color being added as we speak, original artwork by Tim Burnham.

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For the first 25 orders I will include an 8.5″ by 11″ hand impressed copy of the hand set title page by Lauri Taylor of Loose Cannon Press, along with your order.

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The book is 8.5″ by 11″, 77 pages with 160 illustrations and 25 photographs.

The book can be ordered here at the Full Chisel Store, the price is $20.00 plus $6.00 domestic shipping.  International shipping charges apply.  The book will be shipped by early December, 2014.

Thanks to all of those who helped with this publication.

Stephen

Categories: Hand Tools

“Handwork in Wood” – Wood Hand Tools, Part Ten: Wood Braces and Squares

Heritage School of Woodworking Blog - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 9:50am

The following comes from William Noyes’s 1910 classic, Handwork in Wood. See our previous Handwork in Wood posts here. B. Tools for holding other tools: Wood Braces The brace or bit-stock, Fig. 185, holds all sorts of boring tools as well as screwdrivers, dowel-pointers, etc. The simple brace or bit-stock consists of a chuck, a handle, and a knob, and is sufficient for […]

The post “Handwork in Wood” – Wood Hand Tools, Part Ten: Wood Braces and Squares appeared first on Heritage School of Woodworking Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Left Handed Woodworking

The English Woodworker - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 9:44am

After completing a Little John bench with a left handed set up I was struck by how odd it still appeared to me despite trying to get accustomed to it throughout the build. It made me realise that although we offer to customise our workbenches in this way, I’ve only ever built around four lefties, which is far less percentage wise than the population in general.
Those who do opt to go left handed with their bench tend to be new to woodworking, and I’ve found for the dozens of other left handed customers a standard set up was chosen because it’s what they had to become used to previously.Left Handed work bench

When I think about how easy or difficult it might be to use a ‘wrong handed’ bench, I look around and see that most of my tools are symmetrical. In fact glancing over the top of my bench right now, there’s nothing which is handed. I have to move over and check inside my tool box before I actually find a tool – my fillister plane – that would cause an issue. Of course, if need be this could be bought specifically with a left handed design.
I know left handed people struggle a lot with all manner of implements, everything from scissors and can openers, to musical instruments, riffles, computers … almost anything I can think of. So perhaps woodworking could traditionally have been one of the most well catered for activities for left handed folk? There are very few hand tools, bar joinery planes which have any bias at all.

This is likely something which developed incidentally because it’s the grain direction, rather than ourselves, which dictates so much of how we work. A woodworker who’s been at it a good while will be able to do most tasks with their ‘wrong’ hand for the odd occasion. I remember my Dad making me hammer for days with my left hand, as one day, he said, it will be needed. Confined spaces create such issues, and also when planing something very wide with stubborn grain, you can have little choice than to switch hand. It’s certainly a good problem solving skill to get used to putting a tool in the ‘wrong’ one.

After all this thinking it really begs the question, what is a left or right handed bench? And how much of it is simply down to what we are used to? As a right handed woodworker it’s easy for me to see past any difficulties a left hander might face, so if you’ve had any conundrums to negotiate I’d love to hear about it.

I’ve had a lot of thoughts after trying to use this little leftie about how opposite handed benches may even benefit us. I’ll follow up with this next week.

Categories: Hand Tools

Super Fine Japanese Dozukis

The Indian DIY & Woodworker - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:34am
Nakaya Dozuki pair: rip and cross-cut
I seem to have developed an abiding passion for Japanese hand saws or Nokogiris. I can't seem to get enough of them. Currently I possess eight different types of Japanese hand saws. And even that is just a beginning. For, all I can currently afford are the cheapest, entry level saws, all of which are machine made.

The best Japanese saws, I am told, are hand-made and cost the earth - upwards of `20,000! I can't even begin to think of going in that direction. But getting the relatively cheap machine made ones is definitely on the cards as I experiment and try to ramp up my woodworking skills.

Why my fascination for the Japanese saw? I love the clean, quick manner in which they cut and the fine kerf they leave.

Most of them seem wonderfully suited for fine joinery work, which is the way I wish to go. Making clean, well-fitting joints of various kinds is compelling.

I do not use my Japanese saws for ripping long pieces or cutting sheet goods even though I have one  formidable 300mm Kataba capable of taking on fairly hard wood.

Japanese saws in general are more fine toothed than their Western counterparts and more fragile. Japanese woodworkers generally work on softwoods and most of their saws are designed for just that.

Using them to make long rip cuts on hardwoods like Teak and Sheesham (Sissoo) is not a good idea. Their tiny teeth are liable to snap or the blade to twist. But even the finest of them will easily and beautifully cut small joints like dovetails, small tenons and so on on extremely hard wood.

My latest acquisition is a pair of super fine dozukis (backed Nokogiri) made by Nakaya Saw Works, Japan. I bought them from the Japan based toolsfromjapan.com website, which is run by a very knowledgeable gentleman called Stuart Tierney.

I bought the following:
1 ea.     Nakaya Eaks 210mm Dozuki, cross cut.     ¥3,395 or `1960
1 ea.     Nakaya 'Eaks' 210mm Dozuki, rip cut.     ¥3,395 or `1960

I went for the saws because of Tirney's description of the saw: "This small, easy to use dozuki made by Nakaya Saw Works has an enviable reputation as one of the finest cutting saws available…this saw makes a cut so fine that many saw's plates cannot fit into the kerf, let alone cut so fine. Intended for the finest rip cuts in joinery and detail work, it is an excellent saw and despite it's delicate appearance, is very easy to use for the novice woodworker or seasoned expert. "

The cross cut saw has 32tpi cross cut teeth while the rip saw comes with 17tpi rip teeth. Both are made of Swedish steel and have a thin 0.2mm saw plate, 0.26mm kerf width and 210mm blade length. Both saws come with Rattan wrapped solid wood handle with fixed steel spine and a blade retaining bolt. The blades are replaceable.

The Nakaya saw has finer teeth than my other dozukis


These saws are considered to be on the low end but I am more than delighted with them. In fact these are easily the finest saws I have laid my hands on. Moreover, as a hobbyist I would not be able to do justice to hand-made high quality tools even if I could afford them.

These saws are made by the Nakaya company which has been in business since 1907 and currently runs a factory in Sanjo City, Japan, which was established in 1961.

For more details about the company check out their website:
Company Name    Nakaya Company Ltd.
President    Masato Namba
Address    3-6-23, Ishigami, Sanjo City, Niigata, 955-0084 Japan
TEL    +81-256-34-3950
Website    http://www.nakaya-saw.com/en

I experimented with the saws and was highly pleased with the results obtained. See the magnified photographs of the cuts I made on a scarp piece of Sheesham below to get an idea of how fine these Nakaya saws can cut.

Magnified Image: Nakaya Dozuki cuts on left compared to UK made Gent's Saw right

Magnified Image: Three cuts with normal dozuki on left and the rest by the Nakaya saws

I intend to use my two Nakaya dozukis solely for small joinery, especially dovetails and small tenons. I hope they will serve me for a long time.

Indranil Banerjie
17 October 2014


Categories: Hand Tools

The October issue of The Highland Woodturner now available!

Highland Woodworking - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:00am

octoberhwtThis month’s issue of The Highland Woodturner is full of different project ideas including several for the upcoming holidays!

Curtis Turner’s column features an “extremely easy project” on Creating a Stropping Wheel, which is helpful in touching up knives and turning tools. Curtis lets you know the materials you need and gives an overview of the creation process.

Rick Morris has a very helpful step-by-step guide in creating a turned snowman ornament, which then links to two different blog entries on creating a bell-shaped ornament as well as a Christmas tree light ornament.

As an additional feature, Rick has included a two-part video accompaniment to his written article on turning the snowman ornament. So whether you prefer a written step-by-step guide, or watching a video, we’ve got you covered on creating some easy and fun Christmas ornaments for this holiday season!

As a change-up to our normal Show Us Your Woodturning column, Ben Hall has created a video showing off the creation of his turned magic wands. Ben goes through the step-by-step process of this quick turning project and even has his adorable daughter demonstrating how to properly use the magic wand at the end of the video.

Phil Colson has a great time-saving tip on using the Oneway Wolverine Grinding System, which is also one of our featured woodturning products this month, along with the Delta 2MT Live Center.

All of this and more in our October issue of The Highland Woodturner. And don’t forget, we are always accepting reader submissions for both The Highland Woodturner and Wood News Online. CLICK HERE for more information on how to submit and how you can receive store credit at Highland Woodworking for your submission!

The post The October issue of The Highland Woodturner now available! appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

The Good News and the Bad

The Unplugged Woodshop - Tom Fidgen - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 4:10am
  Here we are, already the middle of October. I suppose with the title of this post, it may have you wondering- well, don’t worry… I’m being a little mellow-dramatic. So being from the East Coast, I’ll keep the tradition alive and start with the...
Categories: Hand Tools

WORK No. 135 - Published October 17, 1891

Work Magazine Reprint Project - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 4:00am







ARTICLES FOUND IN THIS ISSUE:
SOME LESSONS IN WINDOW MAKING

HOW TO MAKE A WEATHER GLASS

WIRE-WORK IN ALL ITS BRANCHES

PRACTICAL PAPERS FOR SMITHS

IMPROVEMENTS IN HARNESS

DESIGN FOR A VILLAGE SCHOOL TO ACCOMMODATE 180 CHILDREN

A CHEAP LATHE CHUCK

OUR GUIDE TO GOOD THINGS

SHOP


Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 135 •




Categories: Hand Tools

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