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Doug Berch

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A dulcimer maker and player sharing the adventure of being a luthier and musician.
Updated: 47 min 33 sec ago

More Adventures In Dulcimer Lutherie

Sun, 09/24/2017 - 12:14pm

Binding on a dulcimer

The other day I noticed an unsightly gap in the binding around the soundboard of a dulcimer I am currently working on. Small gaps are not uncommon when binding an instrument and there are several methods for filling them.

This gap was large enough to cause me to consider removing the binding and starting again. The gap was about 2 inches long and barely open enough to catch a fingernail (my default tool for checking gaps) but I would not have slept well just filling it and calling the job done. No one would ever know but I would know I could and should have done better.

Before replacing the binding on one side of the dulcimer I thought I’d try another method of repair. At best it might solve the problem, at worst I might aggravate the problem but I was going to replace the binding anyway.

I ran hot water into the gap several times with a pipette to soften the glue and clamped the binding against the body to close the gap.

After a few hours I took off the clamp and the gap was barely noticeable. The soundboard had swollen a little due to applying hot water so I let the repair dry over night.

The next day most of the swelling had left the soundboard and after cleaning up the area with a scraper and file the gap was almost invisible. After applying a small amount of filler and a bit of spot sanding the gap was gone.

Joy!

Doug Berch - Dulcimer Maker And Musician

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #139

Tue, 09/19/2017 - 8:38am

Mandolin and ukulele duo

Mandolin and ukulele duo.

Doug Berch - Dulcimer Maker And Musician

Categories: Luthiery

Dulcimer Sound Holes And Sound Ports

Sat, 09/16/2017 - 12:35pm

Dulcimer with sound ports in the side.

I have put sound ports in the sides of my dulcimers for a few years and have been very pleased with the results.

Sound ports are nothing new in the guitar world but I had not seen them used on dulcimers though perhaps someone has thought of this before.

There is no standardization of dulcimer design or “right way” to go about getting the results one wants. Dulcimer builders whose work I admire each have a unique way of getting the sound they want. Materials and design elements that work on one maker’s design may or may not work well on another builder’s dulcimers. This is part of the adventure and part of the fun!

My dulcimer design is in a state of constant evolution. Over the last few years I was looking for ways to increase the volume without losing tonal quality and even response along the fingerboard.

It is easy to make a loud dulcimer but I do not find it easy to listen to many loud dulcimers I have heard. Many loud dulcimers  have little sustain and/or often have uneven volume and response along the fingerboard.

The tone I prefer is somewhat traditional; long sustain and a slightly nasal quality with warmth and even response. I did not want to trade that sound for volume.

As I made design changes to make my dulcimers louder I was on the edge of losing the tone I prefer. It became clear that if I made louder dulcimers and wanted to keep the tone and responsiveness I prefer I would also need to give the dulcimers larger sound holes.

The size of the sound hole(s) on a stringed instrument play an important role in which frequencies get emphasized or minimized. The most critical element is the total size of all openings on the instrument. One large hole will produce sound like two holes that are each half the diameter of the large hole, etc.

Dulcimers have relatively little soundboard as they are long and thin instruments. I wanted the effect of larger sound holes but I did not want to lose any more of the wood that makes up the soundboard. The obvious choice was to put added sound holes somewhere other than on the soundboard. The sides were the obvious choice.

And it worked! I got more volume, balanced tone, birds were singing, flowers smiled, and all was well with the world.

 

 

Doug Berch - Dulcimer Maker And Musician

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #138

Fri, 09/08/2017 - 1:42pm


Traditional Korean Music Ensemble

Traditional Korean Music Ensemble

Categories: Luthiery

You Say Dulcimer Fretboard, I Say Dulcimer Fingerboard

Wed, 09/06/2017 - 9:57am

Adventures of a dulcimer builderA dulcimer doesn’t have a neck but it has something under the fingerboard that sort of serves as a neck. Calling it a neck doesn’t really make sense but when the dulcimer has a fingerboard on top of the object that shall not be called a neck then appropriate terminology becomes even more confusing.

For no particular reason I refer to the lower portion of the assembly as the fretboard and call the fingerboard overlay the fingerboard. When describing a fretboard with a fingerboard on it I refer to the assembled unit as a fretboard.

In the photograph above I’m gluing the fretboard assembly to a dulcimer soundboard.

The soundboard is clamped to a flat workboard. Two clamps come in from the sides holding scraps of wood that rest against the sides of the fretboard at either end. This makes it easy to accurately place the fretboard in the right spot and helps prevent it from moving while I apply the clamps.

I use an old trick to clamp the full length of the fretboard down using only two clamps. A long, warped piece of wood is used as a clamping caul with the concave side facing down along the length of the fretboard.  When I clamp both ends down the flattening of the warped wood exerts pressure along the entire length of the fretboard.

You can follow more of my my action-packed adventures as a dulcimer maker by following me on Instagram.

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #137

Fri, 08/25/2017 - 2:59pm

Violin and autoharp duo

Violin and autoharp duo

Categories: Luthiery

My Acoustic High-Precision Thickness Planer

Tue, 08/22/2017 - 7:30pm

My Acoustic High-Precision Thickness Planer

Nothing original here, just an old trick that makes quick, quiet work of squaring and evenly thicknessing wood.

A few drops of super glue temporarily hold two wood runners to the bottom of a plane, in this case a Stanley #5 1/4 for those who care about such details. The plane can not take off wood below the height of the runners so repeatedly planing wood to the same height becomes easy. The top and bottom of the workpiece will also be parallel.

In the photograph I’m planing spruce brace stock for dulcimer backs. The rough brace sits on my planing beam; a flat and straight beam of oak with a bench stop at one end. I use this planing beam when truing and jointing fretboards and fingerboards, thinning bindings, and brace stock. I also use the planing beam as a caul when gluing fingerboards to fretboards.

Yes, it is a fascinating life I lead.

 

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #136

Sun, 08/20/2017 - 6:02pm

American Hawaiian Octette

American Hawaiian Octette

Categories: Luthiery

The Joy Of Honing

Wed, 08/16/2017 - 2:02pm

The joy of honing.A few days ago my finest waterstone shattered. I can’t complain; it had given me over ten years of service and was $30 well spent.

This afternoon a replacement waterstone came in the mail and I took it out for a spin.

I find honing an edge to be a relaxing experience and a form of active meditation. These days I do most of my honing freehand so there are no jigs and gizmos to deal with. I like waterstones because I get a lot of tactile feedback on what is going on between the steel and the stone.

I like feeling two surfaces gradually becoming a single, sharp edge.

A blade becomes sharper and I become more relaxed.

 

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #135

Tue, 08/08/2017 - 1:33pm


Mouthbow and Jew's harp players - Taiwan

Mouthbow and Jew’s harp players – Taiwan

Categories: Luthiery

What’s On The Bench – Filing Frets

Sun, 08/06/2017 - 2:10pm
In the photograph above are some of the tools I use when filing frets after they are installed on a dulcimer. On this dulcimer the ends of the frets have already been filed flush with the sides of the fingerboard. The next step is to assure there are no high or low frets as these … Continue reading "What’s On The Bench – Filing Frets"
Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #134

Fri, 08/04/2017 - 10:35am
You can never have too many banjos!
Categories: Luthiery

More Adventures In Dulcimer Making

Tue, 08/01/2017 - 2:53pm
Yes, another thrill-packed day in the adventurous life of a dulcimer maker. Not long ago I wrote about my reasons for no longer taking advance orders for dulcimers.  One reason I did not mention in that post was that sometimes things … Continue reading
Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #133

Fri, 07/28/2017 - 7:37am
Tamburitza Ensemble
Categories: Luthiery

Musical Instrument Museums On Line

Wed, 07/26/2017 - 2:29pm
Musical Instrument Museums On Line is a site that aggregates collections of musical instruments primarily held by European museums. The site offers a searchable database of instruments, links to the museums where the instruments are held, and photographs and general information … Continue reading
Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #132

Sat, 07/08/2017 - 11:48am
Categories: Luthiery

What’s On The Bench – 7/5/2017

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 8:03pm

Dulcimer in the home stretch

On the bench is a curly walnut dulcimer having its head attached with hide glue.

It is important to attach a head onto a dulcimer, because if you don’t, it will go searching the night to find a head and the one it chooses could be YOUR HEAD!

But I digress.

This dulcimer is one of three I am currently working on. The other two dulcimers are ready for final preparation before receiving the finish and tomorrow this dulcimer will be ready to join them.

I wait until I have 3 or 4 dulcimers ready to go through the finishing process at the same time. I put the woodworking tools away, clean the shop, and dedicate the space to finish work for about a week.

After all coats of finish are applied the dulcimers hang on the wall for several days so the finish can further cure before being rubbed out.

While the finish is curing I start work on the next 3 or 4 dulcimers.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

You can see my work in progress by following me on Instagram.

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #131

Mon, 06/26/2017 - 11:14am

L'Accordeon a Tahiti

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Categories: Luthiery

Thoughts About Selling Dulcimers That Don’t Exist

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 3:55pm

Dulcimer in progress

I have decided to take a break from taking advance orders for custom dulcimers.

Five years ago about half my dulcimers were sold before I made them. Someone would choose from various options I offer and give me a deposit to begin making their dulcimer. I prioritized these custom orders and built them in the order they were received.

While building these custom dulcimers I also had time to build dulcimers that were not already sold. I usually had three to five dulcimers on hand for sale.

Five years ago I suddenly had to deal with some serious lower back issues that added unexpected flavor and color to my life. It has been an interesting journey and it is not yet over.

I am currently able to work in the shop about one-third the amount of time I would prefer to be working. Some days or weeks I am able to work more, some less, some not at all, but it averages out to working about a third of the time I used to.

During this time I have also had a surprising increase in custom orders.  All but one dulcimer I have sold in the past 3 years was ordered in advance.

My time in the shop has become completely focused on custom work. I keep thinking I will have time to build some dulcimers to put up for sale but it just hasn’t happened.

Most of the custom dulcimers I build are pretty much the same as dulcimers I would ordinarily build but the new owner chooses particular wood, string length, number of strings, fret patterns, and other options that I offer. Occasionally someone asked for a unique feature that had to do with playability for their particular style and when I felt it worked with my sense of instrument design then I would do that as well.

The tricky part of this is that when I do have dulcimers on hand for sale they are sometimes not exactly what someone wants. If it has no dots in the fingerboard someone will want dots in the fingerboard. If it has 3 strings someone wants one just like it with 4 strings or vice-versa.

In the near future I will be offering dulcimers for sale and I am thinking there will usually be something available that will appeal to someone. If someone wants something specific I will keep a list and contact them if I make something like what they want. I’ll also be happy to contact people and let them know when I have more dulcimers available.

In the long run I think this will work better for everyone. When I put a dulcimer up for sale people can try it and know exactly what they are getting. I can ship it and you can return it if you decide you don’t care for it. I have sold many dulcimers this way and so far no one has decided not to keep it.

With a custom order the dulcimer is yours. Unless there is a problem with it covered by my warranty the dulcimer is not returnable. Again, I have sold many dulcimers this way and almost everyone was 100% happy. One person was less than 100% happy but still liked the dulcimer.

I think this is a good track record.

So in the near future I will be only selling dulcimers that exist.

If you are on my waiting list please don’t freak out! I am happily working on your dulcimer and you will get it on schedule.

I feel better already.

Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #130

Wed, 06/14/2017 - 4:28pm

Music I'd Like To Hear

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Categories: Luthiery

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