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Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes

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seventeenth-century joined furniture; green wood, hand tools
Updated: 2 hours 59 min ago

Some bits & pieces

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:04pm

small chest

It’s been about 6 months that I’ve been “out on my own” (I think Roy Underhill called it “free at last”) but I still haven’t really settled into a woodworking routine like I once had…Today, I picked up where I left off over a year and a half ago – finishing a small joined chest I made for Roy’s show in 2013…  http://video.pbs.org/video/2365021510/ and http://video.pbs.org/video/2365079634/

I’ve only had it kicking around for I don’t know how long, and it took all of an hour to finish it off. Needed to drive four nails, trim the floor boards, and set one hinge.

trimming floor boards

hinges

inside chest

 

How stupid that I left it so long! It’s been on the blog in pieces a number of times, I even took it back to Roy’s this past summer, where it was the model for our week-long chest class. Now – it’s done. I copied its proportions from some English examples, it’s quite small. 30″ w x 20″ h x 17″ d. A mixture of sawn and riven oak, with pine floor boards and rear panel. No decoration other than the bevels around the panels. Paneled lid, interior till. It’s for sale if anyone’s interested; send an email if you’d like to talk about it. $2,000 plus shipping. or pick it up. 

—–

I finished this carved rail for the upcoming wainscot chair – started this carving as a museum demonstration at Historic New England in early December – at least it’s not waiting around 18 months. I’m working now on getting that chair moving along steadily; doing some joinery on it tomorrow. The panel is mostly carved, that should be done tomorrow too. 

carved rail 

——————

Updated the teaching schedule – http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2015-teaching-schedule/  a couple of additions,

a hewn bowl class at Lie-Nielsen in late August, https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/71

a splitting & riving class with Plymouth CRAFT in May in Plymouth Massachusetts; http://plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=splitting-a-log-into-boards

and we’re adding a 2nd 3-day class at Roy’s (it’s not posted yet) the first one sold out so quickly that we figured let’s add one…so mid-June in Pittsboro, NC. http://www.woodwrightschool.com/spoon-carving-w-peter-f/

Here’s some bowl shots from the other day. 

hewn bowl

hewn catalpa & birch

————

While on the subject of classes – I was talking to the fellow who’s lining up the oak for the joined chest class at Bob Van Dyke’s Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking – this is oak like you won’t believe. If you’ve seen the posts I’ve done recently about the extra-wide oak – same source. Wow. This class is maybe half-full, or nearly so. A time commitment, but a project that will really be something. http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2014/12/16/one-of-next-years-projects-a-carved-chest-w-drawers-at-cvsww/

panels

 

http://schoolofwoodworking.com/woodworking-classes.html

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Maureen is still willing to mail stuff in time – https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

 


One of next year’s projects, a carved chest w drawers at CVSWW

Tue, 12/16/2014 - 1:54pm

center panel

 

Bob Van Dyke sent some photos of the seventeenth-century chest we’ll be working from in the “one-weekend-a-month-for-five-months” joined chest class we’re holding at his Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking in 2015. The first session is in March, (these are the weekends we have booked: March 21 & 22, April 11 & 12, May 23 & 24, June 27 & 28, and August 8 & 9.)

chest front

peeking out of a tight spot

 

The chest (above, peeking out of a tight spot) is at the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford. There will be a field trip sometime during the class to examine the chest in person; but Bob & I will go to measure and photograph it before the class begins. It’s not one I know well, but it has many relatives. Usually these chests have carved panels, and moldings and applied turnings on the framing parts, the drawer fronts are usually carved, with a surround of applied moldings. Here’s a center panel and the muntins of one of these creatures.

detail sunflower

 

Here’s a two-drawer example, with applied decoration from the Yale University Art Gallery collection http://artgallery.yale.edu/

 

 

The CHS example has a vine motif all around the framing, like one that’s at Historic Deerfield, that I have copied before. Here’s my first version – I have another underway now.

vine carved chest drawers open

One big difference that I see right off the bat is the vine’s layout. On the CHS chest it is a full-half-arc that then reverses direction every time it hits the centerline. So the centerpoints for these arcs are on the centerline. I used a compass, then wiggled when I darkened the lines with a pen. But you get the idea.

CHS vine

 

On the HD chest, the centerpoints for the arcs are not on the centerline; these are segments of arcs that flow into one another in a different way than the CHS examples. This one gives you a broader area for carving the various flowers/leaves. Either one works, no big deal. one requires a bit more thought in planning.

vine HD chest

 

Here’s a detail showing this version:

hd detail

 

The lid on the CHS chest with drawers is replaced in oak, the HD one is yellow pine if I remember right. We’re going to truncate the chest some, ours will have only one drawer below the chest instead of two. Our secondary wood will probably be white pine – floor boards, drawer bottoms, rear panel, & lid. All else is oak we’ll split from the log. Then plane each board – by hand. About 35-45 boards, somewhere in that range. Eat your wheaties. Sign up now, this is the one where you’ll learn and execute all the steps in making a joined chest from a log…

http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/woodworking-classes.html#Speciality_Weekend_Classes

Bob has an article in the new SAPFM journal about his school’s collaboration with the Windsor Historical Society – this chest is a continuation of that collaboration. If you’re not a member, you didn’t get the journal – here’s their site:  http://www.sapfm.org/

 


10 minutes, 20 dollars. An ideal shopping experience

Mon, 12/15/2014 - 7:26am

I have another chair to make, like this one. I thought I photographed this one with its rush seat, but I can’t find it. 

plain chair no seat yet

People often ask “where can I get green wood?” – one thing I tell them is for short lengths/small projects, check with firewood dealers/tree cutters…we’re home-schooling our kids this year, but they attend a 2-day program about a 15-minute drive from here. On the way is a yard where some tree folks cut & split their firewood. I stopped today, needing some maple for the next chair. Maple doesn’t store well as a log, you gotta use it up quickly, so I never have it on hand. I found a very helpful fellow in this yard, explained what I needed & why, we looked over the newest pile, picked one out, he crosscut it to about 3 1/2 feet, loaded it in the car & away I went.

loaded

I hate shopping. Avoid it like the plague. But this was a great shopping experience – 10 minutes, 20 dollars – we both were happy. I saw lots of  other nice wood for small stuff – bowls, spoons & more. I’m all set for much of that sort of thing right now…but I’ll be back when things run low. 

ready to work

But before I get to have fun like that, it’s boxing & shipping – for me & Maureen. She still has stuff on her site; even on sale! https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

I have a couple of things left, if you want to send me back to the post office – http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/spoons-more-december-2014/


what’s happening to my monoculture parts 2 & 3

Fri, 12/12/2014 - 12:10pm

not oak

well, I never really was a true monoculture anyway. But close. Mostly oak, lots of white pine, ash. some maple (mostly turned), but there’s even mention in the back pages of this blog of Spanish cedar, East Indian Rosewood, Atlantic white cedar – and the spoons are a range of woods that never include oak. That’s where you’ll see me use cherry and apple – not in furniture.

walnut bolt

But my recent foray further into walnut is really out of this world, for me anyway. Riven, radial, high moisture content. Now I have run the gamut with this wood, from my first experience with that awful kiln-dried randomly sawn lousy stock, to air-dried straight-grained clear stuff – now to the true beast – riven radial stuff. Wow. Hewing it is so much fun I almost just chopped it all up just for the thrill. It’s going to be a joined stool, which I need like a hole in the head – but the book needs joined work that’s not oak. And…the walnut was a gift. Thanks, Michael D.

hewing walnut

Here are the stool parts, planed. Why 5 aprons & only 3 stretchers? Because I had just a little bit of extra wood. This way, I’ll make the aprons. If all goes well, apron #5 will get chopped down to a stretcher. Something goes haywire, I make #5 an apron & return to the wood pile to hopefully scrounge a stretcher. Timid, I know. But I don’t usually have riven walnut around. This is New England, not the mid-west. 

walnut joined stool parts

Part 3 of the “what happened to my monoculture” is really out of this world – this wood was like nothing I have ever seen. I got a sampling of it in the mail – to test it for a carving class. 11 1/2” wide quartersawn stuff – with over 360 growth rings!

200 to 300 yrs

300 yr mark

Alaskan yellow cedar – is not a cedar and might be from British Columbia…but it is yellow. http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/softwoods/alaskan-yellow-cedar/

I just could not wrap my head around the growth rate of this tree. Turns out as I read more about it, the tree grows for upwards of 1,000-1,500 years. That’s old. It’s a tree that has been in decline for 100 years, dying off due to climate change. Seems it’s so warm these days that the trees are freezing – sounds like Stephen Foster wrote the story of it. http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/research/climate-change/yellow-cedar/yellow-cedar_and_climate_change.pdf

We’re hopefully using this for the box class I’m teaching in Alaska next spring. Thanks to the guys up there for sending it down…

carvings

It carves very well, planes to a beautiful finish, except for some tearout difficulties. I’m mesmerized by it. Density is a bit softer than the black walnut; specific gravity is .42,  as compared to the walnut at .51. I did much of the carving without the mallet. Once all the V-tool outlining was done, I used hand pressure for a great deal of this design.

detail

spandrel

panel full view

 

But I have been working up some oak stock recently to replenish what I have used. I only have about 6 or 8 more of this crazy-wide oak panels to prep…the offset handle on this hatchet is especially useful when working wide stuff. this one’s 14” wide. That’s knuckle-scraping wide if you’re not careful.

oak

 

Couple of spoons left, the bowls, etc. The wainscot chair video too – http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/spoons-more-december-2014/

over at Plymouth Craft – if you’re thinking of the spoon class, it’s about half-full now. So don’t delay…  http://plymouthcraft.org/  (3PM – Eastern time, that website is having a problem. We’ll get on it, or it will fix itself miraculously…) 

 


Spoons & more, December 2014

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 7:35am

origins

The other day I wrote about links, to Maureen’s site, Plymouth CRAFT, etc. http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2014/12/09/links/ – and plum forgot to plug my own stuff! Someone wrote recently asking if I had boxes for sale – they said my etsy site was empty. I had no idea those things expired. So I renewed that, though as you can tell – I don’t watch it very closely. Here’s that link – for what it’s worth. https://www.etsy.com/shop/PeterFollansbee

But I’ve kept the spoons here on the blog. that way, I only really have to watch one place. “Keep all your eggs in one basket, and watch that basket” said Twain. I’ll have lots to get back to in the next week or so, but for right now – some more spoons for sale. This is the last (though small) batch for the season…the link will take you to them, or the menu at the top of the blog. As always, thanks to everyone who has made this work possible – I truly appreciate all the support from the readers of this blog. Can’t thank you enough. http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/spoons-more-december-2014/

 


Links

Tue, 12/09/2014 - 8:03am

wedged bretstuhl

I have a few things underway right now, yesterday I wedged the bretstuhl. Too dark to shoot the finished result today. The kids approve, and it’s in use at our kitchen table now. Before I go further, some house-keeping. I had two presentations last week, and am now cleaning & sorting some bits before I get back to the wainscot chair project.

Today’s subject is links. Maureen has been knitting away, and has new stuff on her site. Felted & not.  https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

Simple lace hand knit scarf, hand dyed merino wool, russet apricot color, medium weight scarf

————–

Next, Plymouth CRAFT. http://plymouthcraft.org/  We’re underway, with some workshops scheduled and sign-ups begun. So if spoons, succotash or card weaving entice you, head over & click the buttons…

003

My spoon class is 2 days in January, winter is a perfect time for spoon carving. Along the lines of “give a man a spoon, or teach him to make his spoon…” or whatever that quote is. After these 2 days, you’ll be spoon-mad. The same applies for succotash or card weaving of course. We have started a blog there too…so sign up for that is you don’t have enough stuff to read as it is. http://plymouthcraft.org/category/blog/

—————

Every year about this time, I write about the Regional Furniture Society http://regionalfurnituresociety.org/

Their annual journal comes out (or gets to me in the US) in December. I always look forward to it, and this year’s issue is just great. Maybe 6 articles on oak furniture – how could I not like it? their newsletters are even better. If you listened to me last year, then you’re reading yours now…if not…click the link.

regional furniture 001

 

regional furniture 002

 

——————-

That’s the links – there’s one other thing. A reader wrote yesterday and asked for more pictures of some 2-panel chests from Devon that I once posted. I have few shots of these creatures – I’ve seen 2 of them. I plan on putting one my versions of these in the upcoming (a year from now) book. Here’s some of what I have:

this one just exists as a chest-front…now separated from the rest of the object. I first saw it in England, then it sold to an American collector. Dated on the 10″wide center muntin “EC 1669″.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s one of the panels; these are over 12″ wide.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The other one is still a chest, still in England.  “R A P 1682″ on the muntin. These are both made from flatsawn stock, or varying quality. This one retains some of the pained background; photos are not as good as what I got above, no tripod on that trip. To my eye, these are the same maker.

chest A muntin OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When I made one, I changed a few things, as I often do. I hate the carved lower rail – I think it’s ugly. So I never do that one.

 

white oak chest, 2009

white oak chest, 2009

Here’s an oldie that got away, I think the same guy. We’ve never seen it. Also initialed “EC 1669″ – food for thought. Anyone sees this one, let me know. I’d love to see it.

ad_edited-2

 

 

 


2015 teaching schedule thus far, more to come

Thu, 12/04/2014 - 9:35am

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Posted the 2015 teaching schedule, as far as I stands now. I have one or two more to add that I know of…

here’s the link, or the top of the page http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2015-teaching-schedule/ 


carved box

Thu, 12/04/2014 - 6:27am

box done blog

 

open w till

 

Finished building a box the other day; red oak, white pine. The original this is mostly based on had no till, but I’m shooting this one for the joinery book, so added a till. This box has a wooden hinge; a small extension is made on the rear board, so that it overhangs beyond the sides. Then this “pintle” is shaved round, and fits in a hole bored in the lid’s cleats to form the hinging action. Some shots of the process:

Here, the rear board’s rabbet is double-long. Much of this excess length will be cut away, leaving the pintle. This shows the saw cuts that define the pintle. 

pintle sawn

 

Then I split the waste off. Red oak splits very well. 

 

split it

 

The result. Next is just gets whittled to roughly round. 

pintle roughed out

 

I jumped ahead and here I am nailing and clinching the cleat to the underside of the box’s lid. You can see the extended and rounded end of the cleat; with a hole bored in it. 

clinching cleat to lid

 

There’s a little fumbling around to get the lid in place and nailed on. But here is the side view of the end result. 

 

cleat & hinge

 

This box is a custom order, complete with initials. You can tell it’s modern, because the period way to render a “J” is to make it as an “I”.  But the customer was leery of having this box read “IT” – so I made up a modern-ish “J”. 

initials

 

Then I went back to my carving

back to carving


when’s the last time there were birds?

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 2:07pm

waxwing 5

Ages ago is when. I always stop what I am doing when I see cedar waxwings. Last week, they were here for several days, devouring the crab apples down by the river. There were maybe 100 of them, dropping in and out of the apple, oblivious to me.

waxwing w crab apple

waxwing 3

waxwing 4

Here’s a young one, the breast is streaky…white feathers here & there still. Mask not quite done.

waxwing juvy

The day after I shot these, it snowed.

snow on the river

Waxwings were absent – replaced by American Robins – same gig, same m.o. Large flock, stripping the trees. (if you’re in the UK, think “thrush” – it’s not my fault someone came to the new world and named this bird “robin.”)

They will come back, both species, and eat the holly berries when it’s time.

robin

robin 2


What’s next? Smurfs?

Tue, 12/02/2014 - 2:15pm

I’m not ashamed, I can admit it – I now officially carve smiley faces. It’s Bob Van Dyke’s fault.

smily

I watched the new Mary May/Lie-Nielsen carving video last night – https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/basic-woodcarving-techniques-with-mary-may and wanted to pick up some tools & get carving. But it was 11:30 pm, & I didn’t want to wake up the kids. Had to wait for today. I started in on the next wainscot chair panel. You’ll see something you rarely see here; pencil and chalk. This was one of those 14″ wide radial panels – I didn’t want to mess it up. There’s no layout that I can discern on the original; so I sketched here & there, and started outlining with the V-tool. I spent almost 40 minutes to get it roughed out, but that included shooting photographs too.

I worked one half side at a time – and on each of those broke it into 3 segments that are not quite thirds. But it helps to establish the major elements.

outlining

 

This one below is the bulk of the pattern; missing a large flower in the middle. So then I just carried the same general scheme across to the other half.

outlining 2

 

Here’s the outline mostly done. Tomorrow I’ll add the flowers and then remove background & fit details.

full outline

 

Here’s a taste of the layering of this panel, showing some of these leaves falling under others. Simple and effective.

detail

 


what’s happening to my mono-culture? part 1

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 2:26pm

bretstuhl 3

I guess I am throwing in the towel – and admitting that I use walnut. I used to often joke that I was a mono-culture – all oak. I’ve made enough full-fledged pieces in walnut by now, and several incidental small bits so I guess it’s part of my bag. This chair is based on one Drew Langsner wrote about in Fine Woodworking back in Jul/Aug 1981. I used black walnut with hickory heartwood legs. Oak cleats housed in sliding dovetails underneath the seat; these receive wedged round tenons at the tops of the legs. All the chair needs now is two small wedges to secure the through tenons from the backboard where it fits through the seat & cleats. The carvings I based on Dutch work from the 17th century; stuck with what I know, I guess. so the chair is a hybrid for sure. 

I had made one of these chairs years ago, and had always wanted to try another. So this was the year to go ahead and make a non-English chair. I’ll shoot it for real in a day or so…

there’s more mono-culture-breaking to come…one wood in particular you won’t believe is on my bench. I’ve never seen anything like it. Next week. 

bretstuhl 2

bretstuhl side view

 

There’s a few spoons left, some bowls and one panel. I hope to have more in a couple weeks. 

http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/late-november-spoons-bowls-for-sale/

 


Spoons, bowls & more for sale – November 2014

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 2:01pm

hewn bowl 14-05 carving

 

When Chris Schwarz left his job some time ago, I remember him writing later that he never knew what day it was. That’s the boat I’m in lately…and I got around to photographing and posting the spoons & bowls I have for sale, then realized everyone’s on the road in America – it’s Thanksgiving tomorrow. Oh well…this stuff will be here. Here’s the link, http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/late-november-spoons-bowls-for-sale/  or the top of the page on the blog will get you there too. 

Let me know if you’d like to order any of these items; just leave a comment. Paypal is easiest, but I can accept checks too. Just let me know. Any questions, speak up. 

Happy thanksgiving to those who celebrate it…

——————–

I also have some DVDs of the wainscot chair project left – let me know if you’d like that…

The newest DVD I’ve done with Lie-Nielsen Toolworks is available now. “17th Century Wainscot Chair”

wainscot chair videp

Over 200 minutes, it shows how to make a full-blown wainscot chair based on a 17th-century example. The chair is carved, but that work is covered in earlier videos I did with Lie-Nielsen. I have one batch for sale, or you can order them from Lie-Nielsen if you need other stuff too…

here’s the blurb:

17th Century Wainscot Chair

with Peter Follansbee

The Wainscot Chair is one of the hallmarks of 17th century joinery. In this DVD, Peter demonstrates how to prepare material from a section of oak, shape the chair pieces using bench tools and a pole lathe, and join them together with drawbored mortise and tenon joints. He also offers two traditional approaches for making the angled joints of this chair.

Peter Follansbee specializes in 17th century period joinery and green woodworking. He spent over 20 years making reproduction furniture at Plimoth Plantation, the living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts. In addition to teaching the craft at schools around the USA, Peter co-authored the book, Make a Joint Stool from a Tree: An Introduction to 17th Century Joinery, with Jennie Alexander. He is also featured in three other Lie-Nielsen DVDs: 17th c. New England Carving (2010); 17th c. New England Carving: Carving the S-Scroll (2011); and 17th c. Joined Chest (2012).

218 minutes (2 discs), Lie-Nielsen Toolworks Productions, 2014.

—————–

The new video, 17th Century Wainscot Chair  – is now available. $40 plus $2 shipping in US. Email me if you’d rather send a check; but the paypal button is right here…

Buy Now Button

 


what could be worse?

Mon, 11/24/2014 - 5:31pm

I sent this picture to Bob Van Dyke last night,

smily face

 

 

with the question 

“what’s worse than seeing faces in the carvings?”

Answer – seeing smiley faces in the carvings! 

For the record, Bob also replied – “and the smiley face is really kind of an evil wise ass smiley face- sort of reminds me of some sort of Tahitian or south pacific smiley face carving…why is that?”


my kids complain when we draw

Sun, 11/23/2014 - 6:42pm

My kids complain when we draw together, they say all I draw is patterns & designs. (Here’s them painting; I can’t find them drawing right now…)

kids painting

 

I’ve been doing some drawings lately. It’s somewhat new for me to draw before I build something, usually I make it first, then I draw it… 

I’m finishing up a few projects, which means it’s time to start the next ones…I’m real good at starting them…it’s easy. I always have more ideas than time. A further challenge is when one thing leads to another, and a project comes up out of nowhere, and jumps the queue. I’m right now struggling to keep that from happening. I’m losing that struggle. But that’s OK.

brittany

I had a visit from Chris Pinnell from Montreal recently, and we were talking about joinery in New France. I had remembered some photos sent to me from a reader, and dug out pictures of joined work from Brittany. [It was Maurice Pommier, author of Grandpa’s Workshop – here’s my original post from a few years back –   http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2010/03/27/bretagne-joinery-an-english-book-stand/ and the book is here http://lostartpress.com/products/grandpas-workshop  ]

 

Afterwards, I went back & started drawing this carving over & over. I’ve probably drawn five versions of it since yesterday. I plan on carving it just to get it out of my system, so I can get on with the other stuff I really should be doing.

bowdoin chair panel

One of the projects I have to do next is a wainscot chair. For this project, I’ll be using some of that really wide riven oak I just got in. The panel is 14” wide x 16 3/4” high. I decided I’d draw this design a few times before picking up the tools, that way I know the shapes I’m after. Those size panels don’t grow on trees, you know. This is slightly different from my usual approach. Typically, with this Ipswich/Devon stuff I carve my own versions of the panels…it’s easy enough to make them up using various elements from existing patterns. This time, I’m trying to copy the existing chair …)

dennis wainscot panel no grid

Dennis wainscot panel

 

 

I’ve drawn it about 3 times, including one that’s half the panel, full size. I won’t lay out a grid on the panel, but I will work from the scaled full size drawing. I want it to have irregularities in it, and those are easy to get. 

 

One last drawing – this thing jumped in front others, should be done this week. A bretstuhl – in walnut. Here’s the carving design I made up for the shaped back board to this chair. the chair is based on one Drew Langsner wrote about in Fine Woodworking in the early 1980s, from Switzerland. The carving designs I adapted from Dutch work of the 17th century. 

bretstuhl stabelle


I finally finished a couple of things

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 9:52am

things finished – the box w drawer (mostly, just needs one more board in the drawer bottom.) and a birch bowl.

done

drawer open

sliding DT

side

 

This birch bowl has been around a while, but I just finished carving it yesterday, then chipcarved some of the rim last night. It’s big – maybe 20″ long or more. Great fun. It’ll be for sale soon, no paint – don’t worry. 

bowl side

bowl end

 I added a link on the sidebar to Plymouth CRAFT – where you can sign up for spoon carving, card weaving, lace making & more. http://plymouthcraft.org/

Maureen tells me there’s new felt stuff on her site too. So that’s what she’s doing while I’m here doing this…  https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts


Spoon class, January 2015 at Plymouth CRAFT

Wed, 11/19/2014 - 1:27pm

spoon hook knife

I’m still working out the details of my teaching schedule for 2015 – there’ll be some new places. I think I mentioned before; Alaska, England, Indiana…and most of the usual spots; Roy’s place, Lie-Nielsen, Bob Van Dyke’s. I’ll have it nailed pretty soon. 

One exciting new venue is right here in Massachusetts – local or semi-local people have always asked me where do I teach near home, and til now the answer was “I don’t.” Now I do. We’re in the midst of setting up the classes, workshops, etc that will be Plymouth CRAFT. And along with some food & textiles offerings, we’re ready to cut some spoons. January 17th & 18th; 2 days of green wood; hatchets, knives, spoons – what could be more fun? I’ll have hook knives, students will need their own straight “sloyd” knife and small sharp hatchet. I’ll send a list of possible suppliers..

tools

Below is a link to sign up for classes; mine and others. If you’re from elsewhere, we can send you details about lodging and more…

Hope to see a full class of spoon-carvers! 

UPDATE – WE HAD SOME WEBSITE PROBLEMS; AS FAR AS I CAN TELL, IT SEEMS FIXED NOW. THESE LINKS WORKED WHEN I CHECKED THEM MOMENTS AGO -

http://plymouthcraft.org/events/

http://plymouthcraft.org/event/carving-wooden-spoons-with-peter-follansbee/


who knows what they’re called? Not me…

Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:00pm

glyphs

It becomes a funny diversion; what are these called – both today & in the 17th century. The old name is easy – we have no idea what the joiners who made ‘em called ‘em. Furniture historians often call them “glyphs” – but most architectural definitions call a glyph a vertical groove or channel. 

whatever they’re called, here’s how I made some today for the carved box with drawer. This batch is walnut. Essentially I make a run of molding that is peaked, then cut it up. I took a scrap about 15″ long, by about 9″ wide. Planed a straight edge, then marked the middle of it, (this board is just over 1″ thick.) also marked the thickness of my glyph – 3/8″. Then planed two bevels down almost to the scribed lines. I needed about 4 feet of this stuff; so I did this to both edges of the board, a couple of times. I made extra so if something went wrong in trimming I wouldn’t need to start over. 

planing edge

Here’s a close up view of the planed result. 

more detail

here’s how I held the board – the single screw is next to useless – it just pinches the board while I get a mallet to whack the holdfast. Then I sawed down both edges, I sawed in the waste area, leaving stock for planing the backs of this molding. 

holdfastSawing. simple enough. 

sawing

This is one of those rare instances when I will say to you – be careful if you do it this way. It’s hard to tell from this photo, but I’m pulling the molding to plane off the saw marks – much like a cooper will plane the edges of his staves. Need a sharp plane, set fine. And focus. One slip…and you feel real stupid. 

planing upside down

Then saw the pieces to length, and use a chisel, bevel down at first, to shave each end of the glyph. Or whatever it’s called. 

chisel

 

Here’s some from a chest with drawers made in Plymouth Colony, c. 1680s or so

molding detail, Plymouth Colony chest

I have mine cut and glued onto the box with drawer. so that’s the first piece built for the next joinery book. Next week I’ll apply a finish & photograph it. 


want to see something funny?

Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:49am

This ain’t wainscot by any stretch of the imagination.

PF settee 1992

We saw this windsor settee when we were at Michael Burrey’s a couple of weeks ago. http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/plymouth-craft/ He bought it from a fellow who was downsizing, moving – life-changing somehow. 

I made it in about 1992. Had forgotten all about it. I think I made a couple something like it; all under the guidance of Curtis Buchanan. http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2014/03/19/go-see-curtis-stuff/ I have two or three of the chairs here at the house. We still use them all the time. Much lighter than a wainscot chair, but no carving…so where’s the fun in that? 


preview of Wainscot chair video

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 12:24pm

No sooner did I mention making a wainscot chair, than I got an email from Lie-Nielsen’s youtube channel – they’ve posted a preview of the new DVD, (as well as a couple of others)

here’s the chair one – you can order it from them, or I have a few left as well. But from them, you can get the disc and all that other good stuff too.

https://www.lie-nielsen.com/

http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/book-dvds/


a good problem to have…

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 9:28am

I needed some oak today for the drawer bottom for my box.

drawer w bottom half done

 

Something in the range of 7″ wide, 22″ long. So I went out to the collection of oak bolts in the yard to get something to work with.

DSC_0016

I picked out a few panels; and brought them in to rough-plane them. These had split so well they needed little hewing. Here’s some…

a good problem to have

 

But the problem? Most of the stuff I had on hand was too wide! That almost never happens – it’s usually quite the opposite. The narrow one in the photo above is almost 10″ wide at the bottom end…

narrow one

the wide ones are over 15″ wide and flat – great stock. (thanks, MD for setting me up with it…) -

wide one

I’ll save these for the rear panels to a wainscot chair I have to make. Like this:

 

TD chair overall

Most of the time, I don’t have such wide stock; the one above was similar width, but quartersawn, not riven. You can make a wainscot chair w 2 panels & a muntin too -

PF design three quarters

to make such a chair, see http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/book-dvds/

Now I have to go find some narrower oak.


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by Dr. Radut