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Updated: 34 min 17 sec ago

Highland Woodworking Featured in Atlanta INTOWN

Tue, 11/21/2017 - 7:00am

We’re excited to have been featured in another Atlanta publication this month after having just been featured in an interview on the Voyage ATL website.

Grace Huseth, a contributor for Atlanta INTOWN sat down with Molly Bagby, daughter of owners Chris and Sharon Bagby, to discuss 40 years of Highland Woodworking.

Although Molly hasn’t been around for all 40 years of the store’s operations, she spent the majority of her childhood in the store when Sharon started bringing her to work just a few weeks after she was born.

Read more about Highland Woodworking’s history in our article featured in the November 2017 issue of Atlanta INTOWN.

You can also scroll through this month’s issue below:

The post Highland Woodworking Featured in Atlanta INTOWN appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Toggle Clamp Jig Gallery

Thu, 11/16/2017 - 8:00am

Not sure what all you can do with that pile of Toggle Clamps sitting in your shop? Wondering why you should own them in the first place?

A few years ago, we invited Highland customers to submit their toggle clamp jig designs to Wood News. We were very impressed with the creativity exhibited in many of these designs.

Take a look through the Toggle Clamp Jig Gallery to get inspired – maybe you will find a few good ways to use toggle clamps in your own shop.

And if you have any great jig designs that aren’t shown in the gallery, we’d love to hear about them. Drop them in the comments below!

The post Toggle Clamp Jig Gallery appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Highland Woodworking Featured in Voyage ATL Online Magazine

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 9:39am

Highland Woodworking has just been featured in an interview on the Voyage ATL website as one of their picks for Midtown’s Rising Stars

The interview focuses on the evolution of Highland Woodworking, started by Chris and Sharon Bagby, who have been joined by their daughters, Kelley and Molly, in helping to run the family business.

We are honored to have been featured and we thrive to continue supporting our Atlanta community and the woodworking community throughout the world by providing quality woodworking education and customer service.

Karyn and Tom Lie-Nielsen of Lie-Nielsen Toolworks pictured with Chris, Kelley, and Molly Bagby

The post Highland Woodworking Featured in Voyage ATL Online Magazine appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Product Video: Sjobergs Elite Workbenches

Tue, 11/07/2017 - 7:49am

If you’ve been looking for the ultimate professional woodworking workbench, look no further. Sjobergs Elite Workbenches come in a number of different configurations, and are all constructed with dense, clear European beech. Every Sjobergs bench comes equipped with two massive 29″-wide vises that open to 5-3/4″, won’t rack and can be configured for left- as well as right-handed use.

Steve Johnson, the Down to Earth Woodworker, took a closer look at a Sjobergs workbench. Watch the video below to find out more!

The post Product Video: Sjobergs Elite Workbenches appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

POLL: Do You Use the Built-In Ruler On Your Saw Fences?

Fri, 11/03/2017 - 7:00am

 

Do you use the built-in ruler on your saw fences?

Many people don’t trust them, especially when they need a super-accurate cut.

Whether on the table saw or miter saw, some use a rule to measure the distance between the blade and fence.

And, certainly, that’s the way to get the best-fitting parts.

I spent a lot of time calibrating the scale on my Delta cabinet saw, and it’s quite accurate, but it’s set for my Forrest Woodworker II. If I use my thin-kerf, coarse-tooth Craftsman blade, that measurement changes. I use the scale only when the cut doesn’t have to be perfect.

It takes little time to make that measurement, and, if you’re batching parts, you need measure only once.

It would take a lot longer to make all those pieces a second time.

I’ve fine-tuned the scale on the Delta cabinet saw to its best accuracy, but I still measure the distance between the blade and the fence when cutting furniture parts.

I put a scale on my Norm Abram miter saw stand, but I don’t use it. The plans included instructions for a movable stop, but, when I got through with the project I was out of time and never got around to making that clamp.

I would use the stop, if I ever got around to making one, because I perform a lot of repetitive cuts. However, I still measure the distance between the blade and the stop, despite the fact that I’ve checked the tape repeatedly, and it’s always right on the money.

The tape on this Norm Abram-style miter stand is very, very accurate, but I still don’t use it.

One day I’ll make Norm’s movable stop, but, in the meantime, this setup works quite well.

And, what do you use to measure? I’m not trusting of tapes when perfection is on the line. After all, a movable hook is the antithesis of accuracy. I will use a tape and start at the 1″ mark sometimes, but that doesn’t work when measuring against a blade or fence.

That’s when I drag out my father’s old folding rule. There’s no disputing the meaningfulness of a measurement from one of those!

I often keep a folding rule in my pocket when building furniture. Their accuracy is without peer. The bottom four were Daddy’s. He’s 95 and still very spry, but no longer needs his measuring tools. We are blessed.

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The post POLL: Do You Use the Built-In Ruler On Your Saw Fences? appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Bungee Cord Boom Arm– Tips from Sticks in the Mud – November 2017 – Tip #2

Thu, 11/02/2017 - 7:00am

No Southern-fried Southern boy wants to be called a Yankee, but we share the characteristics of shrewdness and thrift. Thus, each month we include a money-saving tip. It’s OK if you call me “cheap.

The Festool Vacuum Hose Boom Arm is a great invention, and Steve Johnson thinks I’m absolutely nuts because I don’t have one.

What good is it? There are lots of uses.

Relating to attaching one’s Festool Dust Extractor to any sander, it keeps the hose from dragging across your work, possibly scratching a nicely-prepared surface.

Also, when used with the belt sander, it prevents the hose from holding back your progress when you wish to cover a lot of ground with the sander, which is what a belt sander does best.

For any sander, it helps you maintain the surface of the sandpaper coplanar with the surface being sanded. You can do that with brute strength, or you can utilize the boom arm by adjusting its height to match the job you’re on.

If I don’t have a boom arm, then, how do I accomplish these things?

Bungee cords!

I have screw-hooks in the ceiling all over the shop and outdoors on the deck where I do some work too. If one bungee cord is too short, I can double up. If it’s too long, I can double over. There are lots of ways to make things work.

Under threat of rain, I moved the sanding of this mantle under the First Up tent. Now, the work, the sander and the Festool Dust Extractor are all protected. Notice the bungee cord holding the dust extractor hose at just the right angle for easy, comfortable sanding.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Bungee Cord Boom Arm– Tips from Sticks in the Mud – November 2017 – Tip #2 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Getting Rid of Dust Accumulation – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – November 2017 – Tip #1

Wed, 11/01/2017 - 12:23pm

Welcome to “Tips From Sticks-In-The-Mud Woodshop.” I am a hobbyist who loves woodworking and writing for those who also love the craft. I have found some ways to accomplish tasks in the workshop that might be helpful to you, and I enjoy hearing your own problem-solving ideasPlease share them in the COMMENTS section of each tip.  If, in the process, I can also make you laugh, I have achieved 100% of my goals.

Few power tools can take off more material in less time than a belt sander. Prior to Katrina, I had a Craftsman 4″, and it was a beast. The Porter-Cable I replaced the flooded one with is its equal.

Of course, sanding dust accumulation goes hand-in-hand with material removal. The Porter-Cable came with a dust collection bag, and the Festool Dust Extractor Hose fits its exhaust port.

However, if you, like me, get tired of filling that little dust bag and the constant emptying, and you don’t yet have your first Festool Dust Extractor (Betcha’ can’t stop with just one!), you can do what I did back in the day. I discovered that a piece of under-sink plumbing pipe fits the exhaust perfectly if you bush it with a little electrical tape. Now, the dust is directed away from you.

I would commonly use the powerful fan I salvaged from my neighbor’s greenhouse to pull the dust away from my work area.

A bit of electrical tape, a piece of sink plumbing and sanding dust is on its way to the fan.

My neighbor threw out this three-speed, two-directional fan when he did away with his greenhouse. A little cleaning, a lot of Rust-OLeum and a frame made from scraps, and I had a nice, rolling fan to cool me off or suck away sanding dust.

Of course, there is no substitute for a proper dust-filtering mask, and I always use my Eclipse P100 Dust Mask, along with the fan.

Your spouse will appreciate the shower you take after sanding.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Getting Rid of Dust Accumulation – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – November 2017 – Tip #1 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

The Down to Earth Woodworker: Quick Cabinet Drawers Video

Thu, 10/26/2017 - 8:00am

Looking for a new way to construct cabinet drawers for a project? In this video series by The Down to Earth Woodworker, Steve Johnson, you’ll learn his process for building drawer boxes, mounting drawer slides, and more.

Take a look at the first video below and then get started on your own cabinet drawers!

The post The Down to Earth Woodworker: Quick Cabinet Drawers Video appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Book Review: Mortise & Tenon, Issue #3

Tue, 10/24/2017 - 8:00am

We are excited to present the highly anticipated third issue of Mortise & Tenon Magazine! Here’s a snippet of what Norm Reid had to say about it:

As with the previous two issues, I was thrilled when Issue No. 3 of Mortise & Tenon Magazine recently arrived in my mailbox. In part, my delight was due to the intriguing photo of a handheld drawknife on the cover. But even more, it was from anticipating the 10 articles that lay within. Enhanced by a wealth of beautiful photography and drawings and delightfully laid out, the issue promised a feast for the eyes as well as for the mind. It did not disappoint.

Click here to read the rest of Norm’s review

Click here to purchase your own copy of Mortise & Tenon

The post Book Review: Mortise & Tenon, Issue #3 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

The Highland Woodturner: Rotary Texturing Tools

Thu, 10/19/2017 - 8:00am

In the October 2017 issue of The Highland Woodturner, Curtis Turner takes a closer look at the Rotary Texturing Tools available at Highland.

I have other types of texturing tools and enjoy using them, so I was eager to try out something new. I have only had these a short time, however, it is clear to me these tools can easily add new embellishments to a range of turned wood items. They are so simple to use and there is virtually no learning curve.

Click here to read more of Curtis’s review of the Rotary Texturing Tools.

The post The Highland Woodturner: Rotary Texturing Tools appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Product Video: European Workbench

Tue, 10/17/2017 - 8:00am

If you’ve been looking for an affordable workbench to take your shop to the next level, look no further than the European Workbench, available at Highland Woodworking.

In the video below, Morton shows off the diverse capabilities of the European Workbench.

The post Product Video: European Workbench appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Turning Pain into Passion with Woodworking

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 7:00am

Editor’s Note: This heartfelt story was submitted by Lynda Cheldelin Fell, the wife of one of our customers. The moment we read it, we knew it needed to be shared with the rest of our woodworking community! 

In 2009, our 15-year-old daughter, Aly, a competitive swimmer and straight-A student, was tragically killed in a car accident while returning home from a swim meet.

Overcome with grief, my dear sweet husband, Jamie, buried his heartache. Managing commercial development projects, he escaped into 80-hour work weeks, more wine, more food, and less talking. His blood pressure shot up, his cholesterol went off the chart, and the perfect storm arrived on June 4, 2012.

Just minutes after we returned home from town, Jamie began drooling. A strange look came over his face. I asked if he was okay, but no words came. He couldn’t answer.

My soulmate and hero, my strong adorable, funny, brilliant partner in life, father of our children, and rock of my world was having a major stroke. At age 46, he was suddenly unable to speak, read, write, or walk. My world had come to a complete standstill.

Jamie was hospitalized for 17 days. When he finally came home, we faced an uncertain future of outpatient physical, occupational, and speech therapies to help Jamie relearn activities of daily living. Our days became filled with appointment after appointment with catnaps in between.

Little by little, Jamie’s hard work and determination paid off. He graduated from the wheelchair to a walker to a cane to solid footing. He relearned how to feed himself, bathe, pour a glass of water, and change his shirt.

It’s been five years now since the devastating stroke that robbed us of so much. Although Jamie has regained mobility, his entire right side remains numb. The speech center in his brain, which was destroyed by the stroke, is permanently affected. But his mind remains keen, and his intelligence isn’t wasted. He keeps it active by puttering around in his workshop—a workshop that once sat neglected due to an overworked scheduled. Now with nothing but time on his hands, my dear sweet hubby turns his pain into passion by making beautiful one-of-a-kind gifts for family and friends.

Slow moving and frequent rest periods prevent Jamie from making gifts as gainful employment, but delighting others with his woodworking brings joy to his day. A natural craftsman at heart, his attention to detail is unparalleled, and it’s evident that everything he creates with his hands comes right from his heart.

The American flag table below was a wedding gift to our niece. It took Jamie nearly a year, but his patience and determination produced a wedding gift unlike any other. A second American flag table is now underway for another newlywed niece.

Through losing our daughter and Jamie’s devastating stroke, his workshop has become a symbol of our own personal silver lining: what once sat neglected due to an overworked schedule is now a source of pride and joy—and serves as a powerful reminder that obstacles are often opportunities in disguise.

The post Turning Pain into Passion with Woodworking appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Product Video: Tormek T-4 Sharpening System

Wed, 10/11/2017 - 8:00am

Are you thinking of upgrading the sharpening in your shop, but don’t want to break the bank? Consider the Tormek T-4 Sharpening System, available at Highland.

And for a limited time, you can get the Bushcraft Limited Edition T-4, that includes a $40 Knife Jig, $20 Axe Jig and a $49 Mora Kansbol knife, all for $425 while limited supplies last (a $93 net savings!)

In the video below, Steve Johnson takes a closer look at the Tormek T-4, walking us through the new sharpening process he has adopted for his shop.

The post Product Video: Tormek T-4 Sharpening System appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Woodworking Projects: Builder Boards made from Recycled Plywood

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 8:00am


In the October 2017 issue of Wood News, Jack McKee shares a wonderful design he created for a set of ‘Builder Boards’, a great tool to inspire a kid’s imagination.

Years ago, when I was working at a Montessori school, I designed a set of notched boards that kids can use to build their own playhouse, or even better, as children taught me later, to build from their own imagination. There was quite a bit of interest so I wrote up a set of plans and called them Builder Boards.

Click to read how Jack developed the design for Builder Boards and how you can create a set too!

You can also purchase Jack’s book on how to make your own set of Builder Boards.

The post Woodworking Projects: Builder Boards made from Recycled Plywood appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

POLL: Where Do You Get Your Wood?

Tue, 10/03/2017 - 7:00am

The dairy farm I grew up on was pretty self-sufficient.

We grew most of what we ate, from meat to grain to vegetables and, of course, milk and butter.

We grew much of what the cows ate, too.

My Uncle Sam, and his two brothers Bee and Charles, milked separately but farmed together. Their homes were within a mile of each other. Combined, their herds ran about 100 head.

There was plenty of rich, bottomland pasture to graze the cattle on grass in the spring, summer and fall. But, come winter, the only way milk production could be maintained was to supplement. That meant we spent much of the spring and summer growing corn and sorghum to turn into silage in the fall. (Uncle Sam used to love to joke that Yankees called it ensilage.)

We had two in-ground silos and three trailers to move the fresh-cut vegetation from the field to storage.

Think we bought those trailers?

Think again. Think self-sufficiency. Back in those days the only “treated lumber” was creosote-infused. Not only would creosote have been toxic to the cows, we probably couldn’t have afforded it anyway.

Thus, the wood on the trailers had to be replaced periodically. The acids and sugars in the silage took their toll. To get the lumber, the brothers would take a day off, select the best trailer, hitch it behind one of the pickups, and amble off to a sawmill in the middle Mississippi, Big Black River swamp. If I was lucky, one of my friends got to go along. On the first of these trips I made, Junior Cain, a neighbor kid from down the road came along.

We rode in the bed of the pickup. No one thought that was dangerous then, and we never got hurt. On the back roads we sat on the lowered tailgate, big clay gravel rocks banging into our feet. We thought it was great. And completely normal.

The brothers would negotiate their best price for a certain amount of wood, load it into the trailer, and back home we would go.

But, what are you going to do with two little kids while the negotiating and sawing were going on? Why, do what grownups did with kids in those days: cut them loose to their own devices.

And, by “devices,” I don’t mean iPads.

The swamp sawmills had massive six-foot diameter circular saw blades and conveyor belts that piled the sawdust into mountains. And, what kid doesn’t like to climb a mountain?

Junior and I climbed to the top, rolled to the bottom and repeated dozens of times. We had sawdust chips in body parts where the sun didn’t shine. We were a mess, but the grownups didn’t care. We were in the bed of the truck, remember?

All that fun was a fond memory until, a couple of days later, I began to scratch. I was itchy on my head. I was itchy on my toes. And, I was itchy everywhere in between.

Everywhere.

Imagine the embarrassment of a just-prepubescent boy having his Aunt Polly put calamine lotion on every part of his body.

All that swamp sawmill lumber had been gift-wrapped in poison oak, poison ivy, poison sumac, and maybe some poisonous plants that hadn’t been named yet. Everything went into the sawdust, of course. And inside our clothes and shoes.

However, an interesting thing happened. I became hyposensitized to all those plants. I could go into the backyard right now, pull poison ivy off the trees with my bare hands and never react.

There’s another thing I remember about that sawmill lumber. It was hard! Even in later years, when I had good coordination and experience driving nails, I would still bend half of the spikes I hammered. I never knew what species went into those trailers, but I’m guessing the sawyers cut whatever got in their way: oak, hickory, cypress.

Whatever it was, it was sturdy, and lasted for years, even under the heavy use of farm life.

What would we furniture builders give to have some of that wide, old-growth lumber today?

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Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post POLL: Where Do You Get Your Wood? appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Cleaning Paint Brushes – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – October 2017 – Tip #2

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 7:00am

No Southern-fried Southern boy wants to be called a Yankee, but we share the characteristics of shrewdness and thrift. Thus, each month we include a money-saving tip. It’s OK if you call me “cheap.

Years ago a painter gave me some really good advice. We were discussing cleaning paint brushes and I asked him about water temperature. His advice was, “warm is fine, but never let hot water hit the bristles.” I have been amazed ever since at the difference it makes using warm water to clean brushes, compared to cold water. A gentle stroking with a hand scrubber is good for persistent, dried paint.

Stubborn, dried paint comes off easily with soap, warm water, and a few strokes of a semi-stiff brush, but always go with the bristles.

Another tip: Make that final rinse with an outdoor garden hose. It will blast away any remaining soap.

If you have used an oil-based finish, and have cleaned the brush in solvent, wash it at least two more times with soap and warm water. Alan Noel says “lather it up, rinse and repeat until the lather is absolutely snow white.”

Then hit it with the hose, always in the direction of the bristles, never against them. I like to use the highest volume setting on the wand head. On the wand pictured, that’s shown as “bucket filler.” That setting provides a lot of water without the blasting action of one of the jet settings.

This wand’s maximum volume setting is called “bucket filler.” A jet-like setting will provide more force, but you want a lot of water flow to wash the soap away and still be gentle.

After your last rinse, slap the brush against your fanned-open fingers to dislodge as much remaining water as possible.

Spread your fingers as far as you can, then slap the brush back and forth, removing as much water as possible. Afterward, gently shape the bristles again.

Brush manufacturers advise us to save the packaging our fine brushes come in. Storing them in the original packaging helps them retain their proper shape and keeps the edge bristles from developing “flyaway hair.” Heaven forbid!

Original packaging will always be a perfect fit for storing good paint brushes.

To make their storage a little tighter and enforce the shape, I first wrap a little used paper towel around the brush. It helps with absorption and drying, also.

If you don’t have the original package, wrap the paper towel around, then keep the towel closed with painter’s tape. Always store brushes vertically, business end down. Standing a brush on its head sends water into the ferrule, where it will eventually cause corrosion and brush failure.

This older brush still needs help keeping its shape, but it didn’t come in a nice package. We’ve supplemented its support with some paper towel and blue tape

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Cleaning Paint Brushes – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – October 2017 – Tip #2 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Paint Can Lids – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – October 2017 – Tip #1

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 7:00am

Welcome to “Tips From Sticks-In-The-Mud Woodshop.” I am a hobbyist who loves woodworking and writing for those who also love the craft. I have found some ways to accomplish tasks in the workshop that might be helpful to you, and I enjoy hearing your own problem-solving ideasPlease share them in the COMMENTS section of each tip.  If, in the process, I can also make you laugh, I have achieved 100% of my goals.

When you open a can of paint there is always paint on the lid. Some of that paint is usable. If you wash the lid of your paint can each time you open it, all of the paint will be usable.

And, I mean, wash it thoroughly. Doing so will allow you to use it as a palette, which is especially useful for small projects.

I put an entire coat on this stool with just the paint inside the lid.

And for tightwads like me, who cannot stand to allow anything to go to waste, it’s a good feeling, like putting a little money in the bank.

If you use all of the paint on the lid and have more painting to do, give the lid a quick rinse or immerse it in water to prevent the paint from drying before you get to cleaning it.

Wash the lid when you wash your brush. Take Steve Johnson’s advice and don’t use the kitchen sink for washing brushes! When you’re ready for definitive cleaning, scrub that baby with a stiff brush and soap. Tap it back onto the can firmly. Speaking of which, cleaning the lid will make it easier to remove next time!

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Paint Can Lids – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – October 2017 – Tip #1 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Product Video: Hofmann and Hammer Workbenches

Thu, 09/28/2017 - 8:00am

Are you thinking of upgrading the workbench in your shop? Consider the Hofmann & Hammer line of workbenches, available at Highland.

In the video below, Mike Morton takes a closer look at all of the models of the Hofmann and Hammer premium German workbenches. Take a look and figure out which one would fit best in your workshop!

The post Product Video: Hofmann and Hammer Workbenches appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Festool Abrasive Mnemonics

Mon, 09/25/2017 - 7:46am

To help us remember the dizzying array of Festool Abrasives, Steven Johnson has given us a mnemonics lesson using word association. Click here to watch the video he made.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “mnemonic” as (noun) “assisting or intended to assist memory.” As an example, they give, “To distinguish “principal” from “principle” use the mnemonic aid “the principal is your pal.”’

I used it just the other day. I wanted to order some paper for my new Festool RO-90 that switches from delta sander to 90mm round random orbit sander, and Rubin2 was the first example that popped up in the 120 grit I wanted. I thought about Steve’s video for a minute, and said, “No, what I want is ‘general, gray,’” which helped me remember it was Granat that I needed, not Rubin2. A couple more clicks on HighlandWoodworking.com and I was on the right paper.

With that in mind, I asked Steve if I could publish a written form of his memory tool that you and I could print out and nail to our shop walls, or laminate and store with our sandpaper supplies. He said OK, so here it is.

Granat: “General-gray-blue color.” Steve says if you can buy only one Festool abrasive, Granat may be your go-to general sandpaper. It’s good on bare wood and finished wood and is supplied in extra-coarse to extremely fine (40 to 1500).

Rubin2: “Raw wood, russet potato red.” It has a special coating that sheds raw wood fibers. It is available from coarse to extra fine (40-220).

Brilliant2: “Between finish coats, beige.” Anti-static coating that works well sanding paints, fillers, varnishes, lacquers, shellac even water-based finishes. Its surface won’t load up or “corn” as some papers do with finish materials. Coarse to fine (40-180).

Vlies (pronounced like “fleece”): “Clean, scour, scuff and polish.” Steve says it’s thick, like a pot-scrubbing pad. Good for applying paste wax on equipment. Clean, scour, scuff, sand, polish, smooth out irregular surfaces. It doesn’t have dust extractor holes, but dust goes right through it. Grits are A100 to A800, polishing green and fine polishing white.

Saphir: “Shaping or stripping.” Aggressive, super-coarse to coarse grits. Removes a lot of material quickly. Grits 24-80.

Platin2: “Premium polishing pad.” Foam-backed for high gloss finishes, pumice and rottenstone. Used extensively in the auto industry, but Steve has used it on an ebony project. Grits range from S400 to S4000.

Titan2: “Tucks in” to curves and contours. Solid surfaces, couple with super-flexible latex backer. Steve says use it t polish your Bentley.

Find out more and purchase Festool Abrasives at Highland Woodworking!

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

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Categories: General Woodworking

Festool Heaven: Which Festool Should You Buy First?

Thu, 09/21/2017 - 8:00am

For this month’s issue of Festool Heaven, we asked Steve Johnson which Festool he would recommend for a friend if they had never owned a Festool product before. He said the question sounded strange at first, but after thinking about it awhile, he came up with a surprising answer.

Click here to read Steve’s recommendation

The post Festool Heaven: Which Festool Should You Buy First? appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

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