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Luthiery

The Best Wood, Part 2

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 10:58am
Federico Sheppard: Do you ever use cedar tops?

Antonio Marin: Yes, but only two or three per year. This is a spruce town.


From an interview with the great Granada guitar maker, Antonio Marin, American Lutherie #117



A young man visited my studio the other day to chose a guitar from my inventory, he was looking to replace the Asturias brand guitar that he is currently playing. His two complaints about the Asturias were the string length (656mm) and the neck is too thick and rounded.



Spruce/Walnut Guitar


I handed him a spruce/walnut guitar (photo above) with a scale length of 650mm. He loved the neck and the string length, but I noticed right away that he was struggling to get a good sound out of it.




Spruce/California Laurel guitar, Torres/Santos Model

So, I pulled out one of my latest guitars, the one based upon Antonio Torres's guitar FE 19, which is loud, has an amazing voice and capable of many nuances and again, as he played this guitar I noticed that he didn't get along with it.

"Wilson," he said, "I really want to play that Douglas fir/mahogany guitar that you brought to the Guitar Celebration at Metro State."





I got that guitar out of its case and handed it to him.

It was startling to hear him play that guitar, it was clear that a spruce topped guitar was not for him. The piece of music that he played was immediately clearer in sound and quality, no flubs with the left or right hand.

This guitar has a 640mm string length, one-half inch shorter then his Asturias, which he noticed right away and mentioned that the neck on my guitar made it easier from him to play.

For a little experiment, I let him play my old battle axe, a cedar top Hernandis guitar with a 665mm string length that was made in Japan in 1973 and imported by Sherry-Brener, the one that I played at the Christopher Parkening master class (click here for my posting on that) all those years ago. Yep, he could play that guitar well and it turned out that his Asturias guitar has a cedar top.

I told him that at this point in his studies he is a Douglas fir and cedar man.

I never would have thought that wood could influence a classical guitar player that much.




A true Spanish guitar is made of spruce and rosewood, like the woods in the photo above. I strive to make as Spanish of a guitar that I can, even though I am not Spanish, I want to capture that sound I heard in Segovia's and Sabicas' recording when I was studying the classical guitar.

Working with these young musicians is showing me that I need to make instruments that fit them, that fit them physically, sonically and dare I say it, emotionally. The guitar they play should blow their minds so much that they can't stop playing it and through that constant playing they become better musicians. That is a goal worth working for.

The young man will come back next weekend to pay for and take delivery on the Douglas fir/mahogany guitar. He mentioned to me that he wants me to make him a guitar for his senior recital, which will be in one year.

I all ready know what woods I will use for that guitar: a Douglas fir top; black walnut back and sides; walnut for the neck; black locust for the fret board and bridge; and braced with Engelmann spruce.

All woods that grow in Colorado.


Douglas fir that was salvaged from an old bleacher seat. I've had this piece for 15 years

Time for me to go have lunch and get into the workshop and do some work!


Categories: Luthiery

Wooden Straight Edges

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 4:57pm
It is not advisable and can even be dangerous, to entrust someone else with the search for a fiancee, the purchase of a pair of shoes or the choice of a guitar.

Jose Ramirez III, Things about the Guitar, 1990




I didn't get everything done today that I wanted to get done, but I did get started on a few things.

After morning chores, I took the dogs for a walk through our wonderful backyard, which is part of Arapahoe National Forest, and then started making legs for a router table. I have about ten windows (6-9 pane) to make before the end of December and I am not about to plane all the muntins, rails and stiles by hand, I have an expensive router bit for that.

I got the legs glued up, went for a 2.5 mile run and had lunch. The afternoon, I thought, was going to be dedicated to working on a copy of a 1968 Hernandez y Aguado classical guitar, click here for a post on that guitar, I need to thickness the fret board and glue it onto the neck.

First thing I wanted to do was to check to make sure the gluing surface of the neck was still straight, and, as usual, I once again discovered that my 24 inch long Lee Valley straight edge is too long to check the neck. One end of the straight edge ends up on the guitar body which has dome to it so the straight edge won't sit flat. Duh.



The answer was to make a straight edge. If you don't already have Chris Schwarz's article on how to make such a beast, click here and take a gander at how to make a wooden straight edge.

I wanted to use some mahogany that I have, but it isn't quartered well enough. Once again, it was California laurel to the rescue.





The straight edge that I needed most was this one - 16 inches long to check where the fret board will sit. I should have made it 17 to 17 1/2 inches long.





I had a 10 inch piece left over which will be perfect for checking the other side of the neck.





I love California laurel, I wish had some more. It has a wonderful smell, is very easy to work with and makes incredible sounding guitars. I suppose I ought to order a few laurel boards from Gilmer Wood or Northwest Timber.

The fret board will have to wait until next weekend, tomorrow is back to work at my day job.



Here's another YouTube of Leonora Spangenberger.

Categories: Luthiery

Advice for an Aspiring Classical Guitar Maker

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 5:13pm
I shall start off by stating something that could sound rather surprising coming from a guitar maker: a guitar is not a work of art - it is almost fundamentally a technical opus.

Jose Ramirez III, Things About the Guitar, 1990


The following advice is for those who want to make a classical guitar in the Spanish tradition. I do not make steel string guitars, I am not interested in them, but, perhaps, some of this advice can be used to help you succeed in making a steel string guitar.



#1: Buy the following books:

Guitarmaking: Tradition and Technology, by Cumpiano and Natelson, click here;

Making Master Guitars, by Roy Courtnall, click here;

The Guitar Maker's Workshop, by Rik Middleton, click here.

And you must buy every book written by Roy Underhill. You will learn so much about hand tools from him!

Read them from cover to cover several times before you start to make a guitar or buy any tools.





#2: Buy The Naked Woodworker with Mike Siemsen (click here).

Buy all the tools needed to build his version of Nicholson's work bench. This DVD will also help you when you go to purchase other tools for guitar making. Remember, you will need a work bench on which to build your first, second, third, etc., guitar!

This DVD is another "must" for your education!





#3: Keep the tool list simple.

Buy only what you need.

Stick with hand tools for your first guitar or two, hand tools are much quieter than power tools, but can bite as badly.

Safety should always be your first concern.

Click here to read about my list of tools for guitar making.





#4: Pick a guitar to make.

Click here to see some plans that are available from the Guild of American Luthiers.

I suggest that you make the guitar in Guitarmaking for your first guitar.

Do not deviate from the instructions in the book, you can do that on your second or third guitar.

Or you can pick a historic guitar, such as the 1912 Manuel Ramirez guitar that was used by the great Andres Segovia (click here for a video), and use the instructions in Courtnall's book to build it, but no matter which method you chose you must follow the method to the letter and remain true to whatever guitar you pick!





#5: Here is where I am going to get into trouble from the cyber wood working world.

Do not visit any forum on guitar making!

Forums are a waste of time, you should be in your shop making a guitar.

Do your own research on guitar making! Read every thing you can get your hands on and then spend time in the shop working on guitars!

Many would be guitar makers express their opinions on guitar making in those forums and that is just what they are - opinions. Then the professionals weigh in and it gets messy.

Remember this: your goal to is make a guitar that a guitar player will play and use. Very few professional guitar makers are professional musicians.


Tico Vogt playing one of my guitars




#6: After you have made two or three guitars start researching how the traditional Spanish guitar was/is made. Or maybe you will buy into the school of making where every guitar should have a double top with lattice bracing.





#7: When you have completed your first guitar, do not take it to a professional guitar maker for a critique! A guitar maker will not buy your guitar, only a guitar player will buy your guitar!

Players/performers are the ones who will tell you if the action is too high, if the guitar is too quiet or too boomy, they are your best critics!





#8: Perhaps the best piece of advice I can pass along is produce, produce, produce.





#9: You can ignore what I just said and hie yourself to the nearest guitar making school.

I know that Red Rocks Community College in Lakewood, Colorado has a great program, click here to learn more. I know that there are other such programs through out the nation.

One reader told me that he was able to find a guitar maker who was willing to teach him how to make a guitar, that is another great avenue to proceed on!

Better yet, get a grant so you can go to Granada, Spain and study with Antonio Marin or John Ray or Antonio Raya Pardo! Learn how to make a truly Spanish guitar!

A guitar is a romantic creation.





#10: You must live, eat and breathe classical guitars! That means you must love them and that is all you want to make! Money should be of no concern to you, think not of making a living at making guitars! The only thing that matters is that you make them!






#11: If it were easy then everyone would be making guitars...




Now, turn off your computer or other device and get yourself into the work shop and make something!


Here is a wonderful phenom, Leonora Spangenberger. She is only 11 years old!









Categories: Luthiery

Factory Fiddle Scroll

Owyhee Mountain Fiddle Shop - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 2:28pm

Nothing special about this.  It's a typical ca. 1900 "factory fiddle", probably from Germany.  Labelled "Antonius Stradiuarius ... 1736".

I liked seeing the facets.  Hastily carved, by someone who had carved a few, and was just trying to make a living.  After that, the scroll itself has seen some use over the years.

Interesting character, I'd say.












Categories: Hand Tools, Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #82

Doug Berch - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 11:53am

   

The post Music I’d Like To Hear #82 appeared first on Doug Berch.

Categories: Luthiery

1964 Jazzmaster fret marker repair and refret

James Roadman Instrument Repair - Sat, 10/11/2014 - 7:36pm

This  neck came off a 1964 Jazzmaster that was heavily modified and adorned with ornaments.  The fret markes had been gouged out leaving odd shaped jagged holes and the fretboard was worn, pitted, and scarred from some terrible fretwork.  The veneered fretboard left very little material to work with.  To clean up the fret markers I was able to drill holes with a flat bottom drill and plug them with matching rosewood plugs.  Afterwards I drilled the correct size marker holes and installed clay dots.  Since the wood beneath the frets was still the original height I was able to level the board just enough to true these ridges for the new frets to be installed.  There are still areas of wear and gouging between the frets but they all sit level and it plays very well.

Categories: Luthiery

Made a Draw Down Stand for Saddle Making

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 9:02am
The one piece of equipment that is almost indispensable is the drawdown stand.

Lee M. Rice, How to Make a Western Saddle, 1953



I recently attend a local heritage days celebration, there were many great volunteers on site who did a great job of engaging the kids in butter churning, quilt making and several other skills.

I did notice a volunteer who was trying to teach two young boys how to rope, the volunteer couldn't handle a rope any better than the boys, he just handed them the ropes and walked away.

I went over and showed the boys how to build a loop, how to hold the loop and rope coil and how to catch a calf with a simple under hand throw. Then I showed how to swing the rope over head - one boy caught on and roped the dummy calf, he was very excited. On the way home I told my wife that I should volunteer next year and be the cowboy.

Horses were always a big part of my life, I rode whenever I had a chance and my brother and I occasionally got the chance to ride for one of our uncles who owned a large ranch and ran about 500 cows. We could rope and ride with the best of them, but back then (1980) the best wages I could get was only $600 a month with no benefits. So, I went to college.

The day after the celebration, I found an old slick fork saddle at a local antique store for a decent price. My idea is to fix it up enough to use it as a prop for my 1880's cowboy living history program. Though to even start the necessary repairs, the first thing I need is a way to hold the saddle so I can work on it.



The stand is pretty much the one that Mr. Rice describes in his essay, "How to Make a Western Saddle", you can find it in the book How to Make Cowboy Horse Gear, by Bruce Grant.

I used some piss fir (white fir, abies concolor) construction lumber that I had on hand to make most of the parts.

The slot that you see in the leg is to accommodate a 2x4 that is hinged to the back leg. In turn a short board is bolted at right angles to the 2x4 to which you attach a 36 inch long strap of leather that goes from the cross piece over the saddle to the other end of the cross piece. You then put your foot on the 2x4 and push down to tighten the leather. You have to figure out a means to hold the 2x4 in place.





It's a simple stand and for something like this, I used power tools to make it, I had other chores to get done the day I made it.





Here's the saddle I bought.

There is no maker mark on it, all I could find was "Warranted Steel Tree" and the number 077. After a little research on-line, I came to the conclusion that is was made for either Sears and Roebuck or Montgomery Ward, and was probably made between 1905-1915.

It has a seven inch wide fork, a fifteen inch seat (a little short for me), double rig (a "rimfire") with a five inch cantle and it's in fairly poor condition. I suspected that the cantle was broken when I bought it, that was confirmed when I got it home. This isn't too big of a deal, once the saddle is down to the bare tree, I'll strip the rawhide covering off the tree, repair the cantle and recover the tree with fiberglass and epoxy. I know that that is a lot of work to do on a saddle that is not collectible, but some one used this saddle hard and liked it well enough to have had some repair work down on it.





It'll be a side hobby this winter, I will need some time away from guitar making!

Categories: Luthiery

What’s On The Bench – 10/7/2014

Doug Berch - Mon, 10/06/2014 - 10:03pm

I’m currently working on a few custom dulcimers and one will feature snakewood binding. Sometimes when I have bought snakewood it has been labeled as lacewood. Both names are descriptive of the figure. The scientific name of what I am using for binding is Brosimum Guianense. Once finish is applied snakewood binding reminds me a bit of […]

The post What’s On The Bench – 10/7/2014 appeared first on Doug Berch.

Categories: Luthiery

Wood sides for a Korg Delta

James Roadman Instrument Repair - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 8:42pm

One of the sides of this Korg Delta was cracked and the owner asked me to make wooden replacements.  This seemingly simple task turned out to have quite a few challenges.

The brackets that attach to the sides are recessed, at different depths no less.

I used the router table to make a duplicate of the ends. I only needed one template because the ends are mirror images.  I used and oversized bearing on a router bit to enlarge the ends by about .100″ just to give the edges a little thickness. I then used the center finder on the milling machine to locate and drill the holes for mounting the brackets.

korg-delta-06 korg-delta-09

korg-delta-07

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I measured the depth of the different slots and used the milling machine to accurately rout them to depth.  With a little adjustment with a chisel I was able to get them to fit tightly in the recesses.

korg-delta-12 korg-delta-13

 

 

 

 

 

After a little sanding and several coats of Tung Oil I assembled all of the pieces with button head socket screws and installed them on the keyboard.

korg-delta-16 korg-delta-17

korg-delta-18 korg-delta-19

 

Categories: Luthiery

Solid Stainless Steel Floating Bridge for Gretsch Archtops

James Roadman Instrument Repair - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 8:09pm

Tune-o-matic style bridges are very convenient for setting intonation but depending on how well they are constructed they can also be a source for some tone loss.  A customer of mine has a pair of Gretsch archtops with floating bridges that he wanted to have replaced with solid bridges.  I looked at the available offerings but I couldn’t find one that is fully compensated so I made a pair.

I drilled the stainless steel blanks for the proper post spacing and then milled the radius to match the freeboard.  After adjusting the tune-o-matic bridges for proper intonation I measured the locations of each saddle and marked the locations on the prepared blank.  The shaping was done by grinding and filing to the lines.

Categories: Luthiery

Antonio Torres "La Suprema" 1864 FE 19 style Classical Guitar: It's Completed and For Sale!

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 4:24pm
Torres assembled his guitars face down on the solera, having the plantilla of the guitar already cut to shape.

Jose L. Romanillos, Antonio de Torres, Guitar Maker, 1987




I recently finished a guitar that is based upon Antonio Torres's guitar FE 19, aka "La Suprema", which he constructed in 1864. Click here to see the plans that I used to make this guitar.

It has an Engelmann spruce top, California laurel back and sides, Spanish cedar neck, an Macassar ebony fret board, ebony binding and is French polished.

The string length is 650mm, width of the neck at the nut is 51.5mm and 62mm at the 12th fret.

I did not use the standard Torres style of "fan" or "kite" bracing on the guitar's top, instead I used a parallel bracing that Santos Hernandez used on several of his guitars. This bracing helps give the guitar a very beautiful, singing voice that is quite loud, its volume is more than adequate for a concert guitar. Another change from the original guitar that I made was not to install a brass"tornavoz". Click here to learn more about this device.




Santos parallel bracing




The back and sides are California laurel that I re-sawed, by hand with a Disston No.8 rip saw, from a board that I purchased from a wood supplier in Orick, California. Many of the old time loggers and lumberman that I grew up with in northeastern California called laurel "pepperwood" because when you cut into it, it smells like pepper. Other people call it Oregon myrtle. Luthier John Calkin states:

"This is yet another wood that reminds me of maple in appearance and working properties, though its' texture is a bit coarser. Its basic straw color is often flavored with an amazing array of colors and figure, most frequently a maple-ish fiddleback. Myrtle has a reputation for instability that I have yet to experience. Tonewood suppliers occasionally stock sets of myrtle, but if you can resaw, the specialty lumber people like Lewis Judy can give you a better deal on this West Coast wood. This is first-class stuff, worthy of the best instruments."

(Click here for his article on alternative tone woods.)

This is not a flamenco blanca guitar, but a classical guitar.

I firmly believe that the laurel back and sides add much to the voice of this guitar.

The price of this guitar is $2500.

I will post sound clips and video as soon as I can.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at highcountrylutherie@gmail.com.



Categories: Luthiery

1860's Greek Revival House: Almost Done!

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 4:58pm
The great majority of people lived in rural areas where building was largely in the hands of carpenters and mechanics who relied on books. Thus it was through pattern books that the Greek Revival spread across the nation and became for nearly forty years the national style.

Leland M. Roth, A Concise History of American Architecture, 1979




Here's the house when I started working on it in late June...




This is what it looked like two weeks ago when I and my colleague, Mike, walked away to other projects.

We completed the siding repairs and I even found a door that matched the original door that you see on the right side of the building.

It was amazing that it took us 3 days with a skid steer loader to remove enough soil so water would drain away from the house.

We removed so much soil that we were able to fill in part of a washed out on the pasture that is next to the house, the hole we filled was over twelve feet deep, twelve feet wide and twelve feet long!

Yesterday, 9/26, I spent all day scraping paint, also had Jake, another seasonal, doing exactly the same thing.

There is a lot of prep work to be done, scraping paint, masking off windows, gutters, parts of the roof and parts of the stone house that is attached to the building.

If Mike and I can start applying the paint by next Thursday we will be lucky.

Once it is painted I will post a photo of how it looks!
Categories: Luthiery

New Tool Racks

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Sat, 09/20/2014 - 6:55pm
Simple flat shelves for small tools ranged along the walls at random, fitted in between beams and windows. Saws and large tools hung from pegs in the wall over the bench.

Aldren A. Watson, Country Furniture, 1974



I glued the back bindings onto the Hernandez y Aguado guitar copy (click here to learn more about that guitar) last Friday afternoon with great success. Then I turned my attention to my studio.



My studio is about 9'x11', space is at a premium, and I was hanging saws, braces and other tools that I use on a regular basis on the wall in a rather un-artistic manner, umm, the tools were hanging on nails. Not that that is a bad thing, just not aesthetic.

Several months ago I bought several bags of small shaker pegs at my local Woodcraft store so I could make better racks. Funny how long it can take me to get around to doing something, like finishing my new cabinet work bench so I can chuck my tool chest onto the trash heap where it belongs and clear more floor space.




Don't these saws look pretty hanging from pegs!

This is such a great way to display my tools, I always feared that one of them would jump off a nail and fall to the floor. Tool suicide. Now I need to make new racks to hang all of my clamps. Yes, there are several tools that still hang on nails, but I have forgiven myself for doing that.

The only electricity used to make these racks was that consumed by the over head lights, the boards were ripped by hand, finished with a Stanley No. 5 jack plane, the holes were drilled by bit and brace.

Now, turn off your computer or other electronic device and get out to the shop and make something!



Categories: Luthiery

Horsehead pochette

Owyhee Mountain Fiddle Shop - Tue, 09/16/2014 - 10:31am
Strung it up today.  String length is about 1/4-size violin. I experimented with various soundhole shapes, then finally decided to go modern/archaic. Viking longboat, with the curves being the upper and lower bouts. Top is spruce from near McCall, Idaho.


Back was an abondoned full-size violin back, European tonewood.


Neck is carved from a chunk of maple stock. Fingerboad is salvaged from an older fiddle. Width of the fingerboard is more normally full-sized, though the string length is 1/4.


Detail of horsehead. Inspired by photos I had seen of Norwegian Ale Bowls.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/thorskegga/4105357103/in/faves-23218266@N06/


Full-size fiddle at back. "Glasgow ca. 1780" inspired kits on either side of the new horsehead kit. 


More on the Glasgow kit: http://www.theglasgowstory.com/image.php?inum=TGSE00590


Categories: Hand Tools, Luthiery

Otis A. Smith Plow Plane, Fales Patent 1884

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Sun, 09/14/2014 - 10:58am
Fales' Patent Variable Bench Planer: Constituting Plow, Dado, Filletster, Matching Sash, Hollows, Rounds, Beads, Rabbets, Nosings, Case Mouldings, Quarter Rounds, Bevel Planer, Snipper Bits, etc., etc.

The greatest time and labor saving combination of tools ever invented. Universally endorsed by carpenters.


Otis. A Smith advertisement in Carpentry and Building Magazine, December 1888




This plane has been in my mother's family for years. I used it once, when I was a teenager, to cut the groove in the bottoms of some "long board" skis that I attempted to make. I think it had two cutters then, I used the widest one to plow with, both cutters have since disappeared.




Just the other day I was surfing eBay looking for a plow plane and I was a little shocked to find that this plane with most of its parts was up for auction! I think the bidding was at $1200 when I saw it, I have no idea what the final price was.

I was pretty happy to discover that I owned an Otis A. Smith Variable bench planer, Fales' Patent 1884, and to find out that Amos Fales was living in Denver, Colorado (just down the hill from me) when he received the first patent.




I pulled it out of a tool chest and cleaned it a little this morning. As I was wiping off some of the grime, I thought that maybe some of its parts once resided in an old Fordson tractor tool box that was in my grandfather's garage. I am pretty confident that those parts and cutters where thrown away by my grandmother and mother during different cleaning episodes, plus it would been hard for those parts to survive the mauling they must have received from my older cousins who ransacked the garage whenever they went to visit our grandmother.




There's the patent dates.

After some research on the internet, I realize now how rare this plane is and that it will cost me some really shiny pennies to start buying parts for it. I have a few contacts with a local tool collectors club, maybe I will start my search there.

I do have four nice Disston saw handles with screws and medallions that I would be willing to part with for some parts or even a reprint of the owners manual for this plane.

I am not selling this plane!



My mother always told me that this plane belonged to my great grandfather, John M. Wilson (1847-1906) and that my grandfather, Rufus Wilson (1881-1952), used it in his carpentry work. My great grand father was a photographer and farmer, but my grand father was known for his carpentry skills, I suspect that he was the one who acquired it.

While cleaning the handle I discovered the name of someone who once owned this plane - R.C. Jensen. I wonder who he was.
Categories: Luthiery

Music I’d Like To Hear #81

Doug Berch - Fri, 09/12/2014 - 10:57pm

The post Music I’d Like To Hear #81 appeared first on Doug Berch.

Categories: Luthiery

What’s On The Bench – 9/9/2014

Doug Berch - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 9:51pm

I’ve started work on a few custom dulcimers and took a few photographs of one in the early stages of construction. Once the sides are bent to shape I trim the to length using a bench hook and saw. It may be time for me to make a new bench hook. This one has a […]

The post What’s On The Bench – 9/9/2014 appeared first on Doug Berch.

Categories: Luthiery

On the Bench: A 1968 Hernandez y Aguado Classical Guitar Copy - Glueing on the Ebony Bindings

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 2:50pm
Manuel Hernandez and Victoriano Aguado originally worked together in a piano factory. In 1941 they set up as furniture and piano restorers, subsequently making guitars for their amusement, but then they invited Modesto Borreguero, who had worked for Manual Ramirez, into their workshop and learned from him. More than 400 guitars had been built by 1975, when Hernandez died. Aguado had retired in 1970.

Colin Cooper, The Classical Guitar Book, 2002

Between my day job, fly fishing with my wife on the weekends and trying to complete a "honey do" list, I don't get much time in my studio. I did get the Torres/Santos guitar completed, it sounds wonderful and is a joy to play, I will post about that guitar soon.

Preparing to glue on the binding strip


This afternoon, after running some errands and a little fly fishing, I did make some time to glue one more binding on the Hernandez y Aguado copy. I bent the binding stick, made sure that the binding ledge was uniform in depth and width, made sure the scarf joint at the butt end looked nice and the applied the glue and tape.

Tape, glue, doesn't look so pretty yet

Even this operation is a little nerve wracking - I want to make sure that the binding is tight in its rabbet, gaps are no good because they will have to be filled later, and some times my fingers slip off the tape and a finger nail makes a gouge in the top which will have to be steamed out and sanded.

The back bindings are next, I don't know if I will have enough time this afternoon to do that work, I need to take the dogs for a walk and think of something to make for dinner. The bindings are ready and so are the curly maple purfling strips, once this task is complete then I can install the fret board, carve the neck and start on the French polish. Oh, to have the time to get this guitar completed by mid October...


Enjoy the video!

Categories: Luthiery
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