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General Woodworking

Stanley #71 box......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 09/05/2017 - 3:40am
It seems that boxes and more boxes, has captured my limited attention span. I just made a plow plane box and  one for a Stanley #71. This one is for my grandson and I have to start him out on the right foot. I didn't stop there with the box making but made one more. This is one of two that I started a few weeks ago and set aside. The second box is missing a side that I'm still searching for.

determining where the dadoes are going
I will have to make stopped dadoes on this box. If I try to bury them in a pin/tail the bottom will be too high up and the 71 won't fit. I have a router with a 1/4" iron that will hopefully match up with the 1/4" Lee Valley grooving iron.

missed it on the long sides
I started out ok but as the grooving progressed I noticed I was hitting the tail on both ends. On the entry end I didn't have a lot of  room to drop the iron down in the space at the bottom of the tail.  The deeper I got with the groove, the tighter the drop in became. The exit was due to 'aw shit' I missed stopping in time.

very tight fit
The iron just fit the groove, barely. The iron is also skewed to the base which makes it difficult to use if you are not used to it. Every once in a while I forget and square the base to the board and the iron is skewed to the left and I find the error of my ways right away.  I find it easier to keep it tracking in the groove by looking only at the iron and not the base.

two stopped grooves
These were relatively easy to whack out because I was able to plow a shallow groove from end to end with the plow plane first(look back two pics). I then used a chisel and the router to complete the groove.

bottom sawn to length and width
I ran one gauge line 3/8" in from the edge and another for the depth. Even with a pencil highlighting the depth, it was hard to see against the layers of the plywood.

snug fit on the ends
ends done, long edges next
With the ends done I have a visual and an actual depth to plane to.

bottom fitted
inside look
I am liking using 3/8" plywood for box bottoms a lot. They are a lot stiffer and stronger than 1/4" plywood (that is never a 1/4"). I don't have the problems of a loose fit because I can rabbet the 3/8 plywood to fit whatever iron I use to make a groove with. Of course that holds true only for iron widths less then the thickness of the 3/8" plywood.

problem
The front and rear ends are cupped. The corners at the bottom (on one side) have slightly pulled away. If I clamp the box on all four corners and close them up, I can't square the box. I opted for a square box and gaps on the half pins. I glued it up and set it aside to cook.

piece of 1/4" MDF
it's for french fitting the 71
99.9% done
I had a fun adventure sawing this out with the Knew Concept coping saw. I felt like I had no thumbs trying to put the blade back in the saw. I would get one end in and it would fall out while I was doing the opposite one. Then I didn't get the right tension on it and I bowed the blade sawing this out. And my sawing was not very close to line neither. It's a good good thing that this rasp will hog off a lot of material. Rasping this to the line didn't take more than 5-6 minutes.

fitted
I had to rasp a couple of tight spots before the 71 dropped into place.

made it a strong 16th shorter both ways
spray painting it black
This will cover all the pencil marks plus it will look pretty good against the shiny metal of the 72.

dry fit of one of the orphan boxes
I don't remember why I made these two boxes. I think it was to practice doing hinges but it is getting a plywood bottom and no lid or cover. That is subject to change.

sneak preview
I have a few more coats to put on but I couldn't wait to see how it looks.

the lid
I do not like making lids out of two boards. This however, is an exception to that rule. A book matched lid is a suitable alternative to a solid one board lid. I glued this with hide glue and set it aside until tomorrow.

glue set up - cleaned up the box
one of the cupped gaps
I thought I only had two of these to fill but I ended up finding 3 more.

can you see them?
I plugged four through groove holes on this end. I am looking at it now and I can't see them. I used a pine scrap from the same board as the box for the plugs.

I need some doo-dads for the 71
I got a few ideas for the depth rod/shoe and the fence that are pretty much set in stone. The spear point iron is still simmering on the back burner. I found a proper screw and washer for the fence from NH plane parts. I should have it by friday. Finding a doo-dad for that will take some head scratching.

last coat of shellac
Missed my monday completion date with the plow plane box. Tomorrow I will look at this and see if it will get one last coat of shellac or not.

Had a short day in the shop even though it was a day off for me. I went out to lunch with my friend Billy who retired in Dec. It was good to see him again and to chew the fat. When we worked together we went to lunch every friday for over four years. Nine months later, I still miss him on fridays.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
This federal building took only 16 months to complete and opened in 1943. Which building is it?
answer - the Pentagon

Dehumidifier Draining Solution – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – September 2017 – Tip #2

Highland Woodworking - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 7:00am

No Southern-fried Southern boy wants to be called a Yankee, but we share the characteristics of shrewdness and thrift. Thus, each month we include a money-saving tip. It’s OK if you call me “cheap.

In the August 2017 issue of Wood News Online, Steven Johnson talked about needing his dehumidifier most of the summer thanks to heavy Wisconsin rainfall. In previous years, his average summer humidity was 38%; this summer he’s had 56% on average, with a high of 70%.

It’s not just Wisconsin. The Sun Herald, our regional newspaper, published a story in early July saying the first six months of 2017 have been the second-hottest and the second-wettest on record.

Steve, we feel your pain.

Except that my shop rarely drops to 50% humidity, even in the winter. It hovers around 85% most of the year and can reach 90% during a winter rain.

Not long after we built our home, 22 years ago, I had a little rust problem on an old Craftsman contractor saw, so I decided to invest in a Kenmore dehumidifier.

This 70-quart unit is the great-great-great grandchild of the first dehumidifier we bought 20+ years ago.

My wife, Brenda, was along for that shopping trip, and, when the salesperson offered a service contract, my knee-jerk reaction was, “No.” Brenda asked me to consider the harsh conditions the unit would be operating under, and the included annual cleaning that would remove what would surely be mountains of aspirated sawdust. Her argument convinced me to go from “No” to “Yes, give me the 5-year contract.”

What a money-saver that investment has been!

I have scheduled annual maintenance every August, because that tends to be our driest summer month. I would have sent it in winter, but Sears repair has no means to simulate hot, wet conditions in their Nashville, TN, facility, so the performance evaluation would have been worthless. Instead, almost every year, I got a call, saying, “Hi, this is Sears, we evaluated your dehumidifier, found it beyond repair, and need you to come to the store to pick up a replacement at no charge.”

I haven’t kept track of how many “free” dehumidifiers I’ve gotten, but it’s a lot.

Like Steve, I started out emptying the built-in bucket, but three emptyings every 24 hours times 22 years … that’s a lot. To say nothing of the fact that I’m lucky to get part of one day a week in the shop.

My solution was to utilize the built-in drain connection on the dehumidifier.

When our house was new, and we were trying to get grass and ground cover to grow (now we’re trying to get it to stop!), I purchased ten cheap, half-inch garden hoses and covered the entire yard with sprinklers. Once the yard was established, I stored the hoses under the house. Protected from ultraviolet light, they have aged well.

I placed the dehumidifier as close to the center of the shop as I could, while also compromising on a position that’s out of the workflow and reasonably near the cast iron tools that need the most protection.

The nearest floor drain is 30 feet away, so I elected to go through the wall. I know, drilling a hole through one’s home isn’t ideal, but I couldn’t come up with a better solution. (A replacement model I received one year had a built-in pump that utilized a little 1/4″ hose, but that feature wasn’t offered on future models.) Step One was to drill the hole, high enough to miss the wall’s floor plate, but low enough for gravity to do its part, with a little bit of an angle, too.

A short length of PVC hose guides the garden hose through the wall …

… and outside, to go under the house.

That went well, and the back half of our house is on pilings, so it was easy to direct the hose under the house to drain into the wetlands.

Because all of this area is adjacent to wetlands, the environment doesn’t even notice the added water from the dehumidifier.

Granted, I had to buy the first dehumidifier, and I’ve had to renew the maintenance contract every five years, but Sears has provided all of the subsequent units. That’s an expense even a cheapskate can love!

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Dehumidifier Draining Solution – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – September 2017 – Tip #2 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

The Cusp of Autumn

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 6:11am

With the walnuts raining down and the their leaves yellowing, and the sound of chain saws off in the distance, we are definitely moving from the cusp of autumn to the reality of it.  Last week my dear friend Bob came over to bring down several dozen tons of trees for me to prepare, mostly for next winter and perhaps the one after that.  We already have more than half of what we need for this coming winter but I really want to get way ahead of future demands.  The local tradition is to enter every winter with two years’ worth of firewood in hand, and that is my goal as well.  Our objective for this cut was to select several trees that were either damaged or in the wrong place (I am trying to establish a cleared path to the southwest of the barn so I will no longer lose winter sun at 3PM), get them on the ground for me to work with, and emerged unscathed ourselves.  In two hours we accomplished all of the above.

Working with Bob is a great learning experience as he has been felling large timbers ever since he was a boy.  I am fine with cutting it up once it hits the ground, but I’ve heard there is unending paperwork if you drop a twenty ton tree on yourself so I defer to him in this enterprise.  He stands at the base of the tree looking at its trunk and crown, judging both the direction it would like to fall and the degree to which that trajectory can be altered.  Then he sets to work, back notching then felling the tree.  In every instance of the two dozen trees we (and by “we” I mean “he”) dropped it came down exactly where he wanted it to come down.

Now it is up to me to cut them into short bolts, process them with the hydraulic splitter, and stack them to season.  Starting next week I will begin filling the firewood crib and the front porch with a mountain of BTUs.

The most beautiful sound in the depths of winter is when Mrs. Barn remarks, “Hmm, kinda warm in here, isn’t it?”

Congratulations to Al Spicer – Grand-Prize Winner, 2017 Excellence Awards

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 4:00am

We had a heck of a time deciding on the Editors’ Choice winners – and the Grand Prize winner – in the 2017 PWM Excellence Awards. There was so much outstanding work from which to choose. But we had to pick…so here they are: The Editors’ Choice and Readers’ Choice winners in each of the five categories, led off by the stunning work of Al Spicer – recipient of the Grand […]

The post Congratulations to Al Spicer – Grand-Prize Winner, 2017 Excellence Awards appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Learn to scythe at Perth, Scotland

Steve Tomlin Crafts - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 2:11am
Photos from this weekend's Learn to Scythe courses in Scotland. Continue reading
Categories: General Woodworking

another photo sunday......

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 09/04/2017 - 1:52am
I got into a good groove today and I humped and pumped like I was a young pup. I got a lot of things done and even I was impressed at quitting time with the items ticked off in column A. For the third time I am doing a picture blog with a minimum of keyboard diarrhea.

quiet time work - road testing Myles's block plane
even shavings from the right and left side
end grain - mostly dust
advanced the iron and better shavings - end grain test ok
this is what I wanted to do yesterday and today - I started these a few weeks ago
lost a side somewhere - I'll saw this one in half
epoxy set up on the doo-dad end caps
everything still fits
good fit and it is secure
flushed the ends and the tops
planed a chamfer on the side facing the interior of the box
about 1/2 way just in case I add a wooden auxiliary fence
enough room to take it out and put it back
pocket for the iron box
this will keep the box in place so it doesn't flop around in the box
a spacer to set the board for wiggle room
Stanley 71 parts out of the Evaporust, rinsed and blown dry
spear point iron
got some pitting where I don't want it
cross hatching
This keeps the iron from shifting while using it. The shaft that this screws onto is slanted so the toe is down and the heel rises up at the back.

Wally World run
I used to save my shop towels and wash them at the laundermart but I can't do that anymore. The 'industrial' machine they had where you could wash anything you wanted, is gone. I won't wash them at home because I don't want the possibility of whatever staining something of my wife's.

I use them and toss them
made glue sticks with the T77 spray adhesive
I made four sanding sticks out of one sheet of sandpaper. This was left and it is enough to do this one edge. I got this tip from watching the Plane Collector on You Tube.

I sawed each one into thirds without ripping or shredding the sandpaper
the 1/2" iron has pitting too
80 grit runway - I tried to sand the pits out
got lucky and I was able to sand out all the pits
tried sanding this as is and it was way to difficult to do -very hard to hold and push at the same time
put it together and this way was much better
I was concerned about doing it this way because the iron is screwed to the shaft. The countersink is large and the screw head is below the iron by about 3 frog hairs. I got lucky with this iron too and was able to sand out the pits.

had the runway set up so I worked on the 71 base
120 grit after a couple of minutes work - dropped down to 80 grit and started over
320 grit
completed with a sanding block with 400 and then 600 grit - raised a good shine
orange cleaner got some of the stains
tried WD-40 next - not sure if it did anything
this seemed to work - most of the stains are gone now
sharpened, honed, and stropped
Stanley 71 is done
test dado - sawed the walls and chiseled out most of the waste
works very well
done - I like the action and feel of this better than my LN router
brush box needs a latch
going to make one out of a brass mending plate
checked this one but it is too wide for 1/2" stock
sawed the notch and filed it smooth
done
no problems working the latch blind
metric drill caddy box glamour shot
8 out of 10 stayed home
I put this by the drill press
I need a box for Myles's Stanley #71
found a toolbox
I made this about 8 years ago(?) to be just a box. I converted it to a tool box to take to a Lie Nielsen weekend class I took several years ago. I didn't take it because it was too heavy.

french fitted for a lot of tools I don't know what, where, or how they fit now
bottom laid out for planes but no saws
I like that it has a lock
Myles's new toolbox
This toolbox was under the one above. I made this a few years back, stuck in the boneyard, and promptly forgot about it. I had to rap on the lid with a hammer to open it.

I can fit a lot more tools (saws too) in this one
the back - I think this was Chris S inspiration build
bottom has replaceable ship lapped boards nailed on
needs a till or maybe two
some tools for Myles besides the planes
This will work out great for me. I can buy tools for him and have a place to put them.

made the box for Myles's #71
tried to make this one as small as possible
flushing the bottom - knocking this corner down is first
now the plane will turn the corner
bottom has no twist
tear out
Even with planing this at an angle I still got tear out. I turned the box around so the plane did this first with the grain. This is the top which is trickier to do than bottom because the front is open.

top has no twist too
plow plane box (still no finish)
I decided on bevels to match the front of the lid. I got 2 coats of shellac on after this and it'll be done by monday.

3 tries
Finally got the plow set - 1/4" from the edge and 1/4" deep. I'll plow the grooves for Myles's box tomorrow.
accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What was the highest rated TV show of all time?
answer - the final episode of MASH in February of 1983

Don’t Screw (up) Your Wood Top

Wunder Woods - Sun, 09/03/2017 - 10:34am

Recently, I got a question from a customer regarding a crack forming in his solid wood countertop. He built the top out of flat sawn white oak lumber and he wanted to figure out what caused the crack and hopefully, how he could repair it. Luckily, the repair is simple (just some glue and clamps), but he really needed to address the cause of the problem or the countertop would most likely crack again.

This countertop split in the back corner because it was screwed firmly in place and couldn’t move.

This view from inside the cabinet shows how the top was attached with no room for movement.

When he sent me photos of the crack, he also sent me photos of the how he attached it to the cabinets, which was very helpful. The vintage metal cabinets have a bracket in each corner with a hole just large enough for a screw, but not large enough to allow for any movement in the top. In this case, the wood was stuck in place and had no choice but to split when it shrunk in width.

I recommended to simply make the holes in the metal bracket bigger and to add a washer or use a large-headed screw to allow the top to move side to side while still being held down. The secret is to tighten the screws just enough to hold the top in place, but loose enough to allow it to move if the wood starts to pull.

This particular solution was pretty simple, but only because I have seen it many times before, and I knew what caused it. Without understanding how wood moves, the diagnosis wouldn’t be so apparent. Even though most people don’t worry about wood movement as much as I do, I always try to get them to understand the most basic premise, which is that wood moves more in width than it does in length, and you need to allow for that movement.

In woodworking in general, this disparity in movement is referred to as a “cross-grain situation”, when two pieces of wood come together with grain perpendicular to each other, then they want to pull in opposite directions. It happens all of the time in furniture construction, and it must be addressed to avoid catastrophic failures. In the example above, the setup was the same as a cross grain situation because the metal cabinet will not change in any dimension, while the wood moves in width.

When attaching wood tops of any kind, whether it be a wood countertop to a cabinet or a table top to a table base, you need to allow the top to move or it can split. The good news is that there is more than one way to attach a top and still make allowances for this movement.

The first and most common way, as mentioned earlier, is to make an oversized or elongated hole and to make up any differences with a washer or large-headed screw. Assume that any problems will be caused by excessive shrinkage and make sure that your holes are big enough and that your screws are placed in the holes so that the top has room to shrink.

It easy to make blocks like this for attaching tops. The screw is firmly in the block, but the lip on the block can slide if the top pulls hard.

Another method, which I like to use on tables, is to make blocks to fit into dados on the insides of the aprons. They don’t take too long to make and can easily be added wherever necessary. The blocks should be made so that tightening up the screws will just pull the top snug, like a perfect fitting tongue and groove joint and placed with a little separation to make sure nothing binds. They work great, and I think they look great too.

When attaching a top with a propensity to move, understand that all of your attachment points don’t have to have play in them. For example, you can firmly attach a countertop to the front of a cabinet as long as you allow the top to move in the back. Or, on table tops, you might choose to firmly attached the top in the middle of the width and allow the outside edges to move. This is perfectly acceptable and keeps the top centered on the base.

The main point to remember through all of this is to allow the wood to move. You can only really cause a problem if you don’t allow it to move. And remember , if you find that it is moving too much for your liking you can always go back and firm things up once you understand the potential problems.

For a more thorough description of wood movement click on these two earlier posts Have Your Heard About Shrinkage? or Why Quartersawn Lumber is so Stable: The 0-1-2 Rule In Action, to read a link on the subject. I think it is probably the most important subject for any woodworker to fully understand.

 


Categories: General Woodworking

Fly Rail

360 WoodWorking - Sun, 09/03/2017 - 6:48am
Fly Rail

Last week I wrote about how you could use a simple jig setup to begin the steps to make a knuckle joint for a Pembroke table – same jig used to make box joints and moldings. After you have your knuckle joint constructed, what do you do your the “fly” rail to make it work? The rail should swing out to support your table leaf. And while not at work, it conceals the the fixed apron set behind it.

Continue reading Fly Rail at 360 WoodWorking.

tool rehab day.......

Accidental Woodworker - Sun, 09/03/2017 - 2:52am
Doing a tool rehab for today wasn't on the menu but it is what I decided to do. I bought a Stanley block plane for my grandson's toolbox and a 1/2" skewed wooden rabbet plane for me. I bought them from Hyperkitten tools and I got them late on friday night. I had already written the blog for posting on saturday so they didn't make it into it. The menu had the plow plane box as the entree but the epoxy work sidelined that. So I thought I would quickly whack out a rehab.

Stanley block plane
This is the 20° angle plane which I think is the 60 1/2?. I'm not sure of that but it has an adjustable mouth and it is in great shape. Almost all the japanning is present and it is clean. Most of the Stanley block planes I see look like they served in WWII.

another potential problem area
The lateral lever adjust for the iron is in great shape. I see a lot of these with rounded end tab missing or bent in the wrong direction. This plane looks like it was bought, looked at, and stuck on a shelf after using it once or twice. This will be good block plane for Myles to use.

my 1/2" skew rabbet plane
This plane has an odor that I can't put my finger on. A lot of my wooden planes have an odor to them but they usually aren't as strong as this one is. This one I can still smell on my fingers hours after using it.

owned by someone with an F
escapement side
It looks like this is not the original iron. There is a about 3/8" above the top of the iron going into the plane body. It could be the original iron too and it has been shortened by sharpenings.

no problems making a cross grain rabbet
As you can see I didn't run a knife line first but that didn't stop the plane from doing it's work.

plane iron update
I put an iron from "Tools from Japan(?)" in the 4 1/2 and a Ray Iles in the 5 1/2 at the same time. I used the 5 1/2 more than the 4 1/2 flattening bunch of boards. The iron in the 4 1/2 is dull. It is still cutting but I can feel it isn't as easy. I would have bet the iron from Japan would have outlasted the Ray Iles at a minimum, 2 to 1.

this one still feels like it is sharp
drill caddy bottom closed up
This is almost done. I got the last coat of oil on it today and tomorrow I'll post a glamour shot.

the epoxy has set
I lightly ran the ends over some 100 grit to give it a tooth for the next application of epoxy.

end caps epoxied and taped until tomorrow
my grandson's plane herd
From the top left, a 5 1/4, #4, #3, and a block plane. I think this is a good starting point for Myles. I would like to add a low angle block plane to complete this. I am undecided about whether or not I should add a #6 or a #7. I've time on that as I still haven't made the toolbox.

the next batter
I broke the plane down to parade rest and it is a lot cleaner than I initially thought it was. There is hardly any dirt or dust built up in the nooks and crannies. This should be a quick and easy rehab turn around.

this was a PITA to get off
the brass is nice and shiny
worked the iron next
The back was pretty flat and I finished that and made it shiny too.

had to regrind the angle to 25°
hit a big hiccup here
I thought I was going to be able to remove some scratches and shine up the sole on the granite block starting with 400 grit. That didn't happen sports fans. The 400 grit was barely touching the sole so I dropped down to 220 and that wasn't much better. The clean look of the plane was deceiving.

80 grit
I have a hump on this sole. The front and rear first quarter inches are the low spots. I know now why this looks so good. I didn't try this before I started doing this to confirm it. I'll bet this plane rocked while planing which is why it was set aside.

an hour later
I didn't go at this for an hour straight. It was more of  10 minutes on the runway and 10 minutes resting. I still haven't get it flat end to end but I did close it up some on the toe and heel.

12" precision straight edge
An 1/8" in from the toe and about an 1/8" from the heel, I'm dead nuts flat. I can't see any daylight under the heel but I can see it at the toe.

320 grit
Including breaking for lunch, I had over 3 hours into this rehab at this point. I thought this would have been a 30 minute job tops. Including coffee and head breaks. After 320, I finished up with 400 and 600.  After all this sanding was done I still didn't get the sole down to the low spots. I think that this is the best that I'll be able to do with this without sanding through the sole.

starboard side
stern shot
port side


bow shot
The plane was washed and cleaned with orange cleaner and I applied Autosol to the sides and the sole. I did all this to get it looking pretty but I didn't road test it. I forgot to do it before I put it away with Myles's other planes. I'll do that tomorrow.

my grandson's #71
The depth rod sticks and it was very hard to push through the hole. I checked the rod thinking it was the problem because it had what looked to be a rust bloom on it. It wasn't the problem and the rod cleaned up and feels smooth end to end. When I put the rod in the hole I could feel a burr or something in the hole close to the top.

no more burrs
I first tried 400 grit wrapped on the dowel but it wasn't doing too much. I got rid of whatever was on the inside of the hole with 220 grit. The depth rod slides up and down freely now

Evaporust bath
There are only a few parts that need this bath. Most of the plane and it's parts are nickel plated. The thumb screws have a few spots of nickel lost and rust but those I can sand. It is looking like this one will be an easy tool to rehab and turn around quickly.

had to use heat
I tried WD40, PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, and penetrating oil over the past week and none of them loosened the screw.  It took heat to finally break the screw free. I tossed this into the Evaporust too.

I meant to go to Pepin Lumber today but I forgot it. They have 1" thick x 12" wide pine, rough one side and smooth on the other, that I want to use for my grandson's toolbox. Maybe next week end I'll get it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is Hansen's disease?
answer - leprosy

doo-dads........

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 09/02/2017 - 3:00am
Before I started working on the doo-dads for the plow plane box, I checked the lid in the box first. I got a wee bit of surprise with it in that it was hard to push it all the way home. The lid had bowed slightly across it's width and I had to plane the back corners to get it to slide smoothly again. I also noticed that the back wasn't square and tight there neither. I'll play with that before I applied the finish.

oops
This is what I did thursday night after dinner. I drilled the hole on the right on the wrong side of the layout line.

drilled a practice one first
This is what I should have done last night but I thought I could eyeball the layout lines and get away with that. I think that if I had drilled the hole on the correct side of the line, it would have worked.


fits the fence rods
The rods are 5/16" and the holes I drilled are 11/32 which gives me some wiggle room.

clamped it to the doo-dad
I flushed the backs and marked the holes by tapping on the drill. I drilled the holes on the drill press.

everything fits with room to spare
I had to thin the holder for the plane
I had to saw off a little more than 5/8". If I had put the slot on the other face I wouldn't have had to saw it. I put the plane in the thinnest face because I thought it looked better and it also made things not quite as tight.

the doo-dads aren't quite done
I made the slots for the conversion fence and the plane about a 1/4" longer than the parts. The ends are open and won't work well with keeping the two of them contained. I'm going to epoxy caps on the ends to keep them in place.

using the good stuff
sized the ends
I want the end caps to be secure and this is an end grain to long grain connection. I know that this epoxy will not hold if I attach the caps to the ends now. Sizing the ends and then epoxying the caps on will be a very strong joint. I did this same thing on my xmas present stands. As far as I know they are all still together(all 5 of mine are). This will add a couple of more days to the completion but in the interim I can complete the finishing.

metric drill caddy box
 The 3 and 4 mm bits are in holes a lot looser than the others. These two fall out if I turn the box upside down and fall out through this gap. I am going to glue a strip to the box to close this gap off. This is a piece of ash cutoff from the doo-dads that is a perfect fit.

it's almost 1700
I'll let this set up until tomorrow. The last thing I did before I left the shop was to apply a second coat of oil to the drill caddy. Tomorrow I'll put the second and final coat on the box.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What was the only state (colony) not invaded by the British during the Revolutionary War?
answer - New Hampshire


birds not woodworking

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 7:19pm

I recently spent a great day with our friend Marie Pelletier up in Newbury, Massachusetts at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, aka Plum Island. She got great shots of many of the birds we saw… maybe this will take you to her shots – https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10213122359110858&set=pcb.10213122371511168&type=3&theater 

It was not the best light for me, my camera shoots kinda dark. But here’s some of what I got that day:
Egrets were the bird of the day; both snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Ardea alba)  – here’s one of the great egrets:

 

a bunch of the snowies:

great again

snowies again

They weren’t the only long-legged waders around though – we saw Great Blue Herons now and then (Ardea herodias)

A juvenile Northern Harrier – (Circus cyaneus )

The swallows were really the most impressive sight. Their numbers were out of this world. They’re “staging” – stopping here to feed and gather in huge flocks for migration. Many (most/all?) of these are tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) – there’s no way this photo or any photo captures the impact of seeing this many birds. they were in constant motion, and the sound of them hitting the water to feed on insects was LOUD. 

Here they are streaming through a gap in some trees, just an amazing sight. 

I never skip a chance to watch cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) this one was very cooperative

A couple of days later, at Pret & Paula’s house, an eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). Too distant for my camera, but such a treat to see it poking out of this dead tree:

Then this morning, the flock of common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula) with some other blackbirds mixed in, come streaming up from the marsh just around sunrise:


Making a Handy Sandpaper Tote – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – September 2017 – Tip #1

Highland Woodworking - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 7:00am

Welcome to “Tips From Sticks-In-The-Mud Woodshop.” I am a hobbyist who loves woodworking and writing for those who also love the craft. I have found some ways to accomplish tasks in the workshop that might be helpful to you, and I enjoy hearing your own problem-solving ideasPlease share them in the COMMENTS section of each tip.  If, in the process, I can also make you laugh, I have achieved 100% of my goals.

I suppose you could say I have two sanding centers. One holds the oscillating spindle sander and, because it has drawers, stores all of the disks for various Festool Sanders, too. It may be too fancy for some folks’ taste, being made from “real wood.”

This “sanding center” is on a universal wheeled base and can be rolled almost anyplace. The dust collection can connect to the cyclone or a shop vacuum, and the assortment of sanding disks can be close by wherever the sanding is taking place. If you’re constantly changing grits, that’s a really handy feature.

Mechanization is fine, as far as it goes. Sometimes, though, a job calls for hand sanding. Because we don’t want to be walking back and forth to our sandpaper supply, I made a sandpaper tote.

Our dear friends at the local Mexican restaurant saved some big steel cans for us. I spent about a million dollars (sorry, Steve) on Rust-OLeum rusty metal primer and Rust-OLeum flat black to coat the cans well before putting them to use. After all, they were going to be holding abrasives.

I attached the cans to a scrap piece of treated pine, and used the handle from an old Stihl string trimmer to complete the tote.

Fortunately, the old Stihl string trimmer handle was black, so the whole project was color-coordinated.

In the cans I put 1/3-sheet sanding blocks, scraps of sandpaper in Ziploc bags and a variety of other items that are used in sanding. Each can has a grit number assigned, with the appropriate Ziploc of scraps and a sanding block with that grit installed. The scraps all have their grit marked.

The cans are marked with Post-It Notes, just in case I want them to hold different grits in the future. One can holds a miscellany of sanding-related aids. For example, the rod can be slipped into the sanding block to lift the “lid” without ruining the ends of the paper. That way, they can go into the scrap Ziploc assigned to its grit, and not be wasted. Old scissors are handy for cutting sandpaper, or anything else that gets in your way. There’s an air blower for cleaning the paper when it clogs.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Making a Handy Sandpaper Tote – Tips from Sticks in the Mud – September 2017 – Tip #1 appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

plow plane box pt V.......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 1:13am
I didn't get to finish the doo-dads for the box. I thought it would have been a done deal but it didn't happen. Sometimes things take way longer than I think they will. Tonight cutting and fitting the plugs for the box took most of my shop time to get done. I'm not a slow worker and I got into a groove doing these and lost all track of time. I'll still get this done before the weekend.


another first for me
I used the 5 1/2 to clean and flush the tails and pins on the box. Using that plane left ridges even though my corners on the plane are rounded off. I smoothed everything with the #3. I need it smooth because I'm going to wax the box instead of shellacing it.


enough walnut for a hundred boxes
I saved these pieces from something else(?) for just this purpose.

back is done
I tried to make sure that the plug end showing was face grain. I want these pop and be an eye catcher and face grain will do that better than end grain.

1645 and I'm finishing up the last plug
conversion fence
I was expecting this to be metric but it is measuring a frog hair under 1/8". I have them squeezed on the fence here to snap the pic.

the plane body measures the same
slot for the fence
I was going to make this groove with my record plow plane but it's maximum depth is only 1/2 of this. I made this one on the tablesaw. The fit of the fence in the slot is perfect. It isn't too tight nor too loose.

the planned spot for the fence
Getting to the conversion fence won't be a problem. This fence will still be needed so it'll come off first regardless and then I can grab the conversion fence. The brass screw will go in a hole inbetween the fence rods.

I measured the rods and they are 5/16" diameter. Again I was expecting metric but I'm happy with the imperial.  Tomorrow I'll make a drilling guide for the rods and make some practice holes before I drill the holes in the box doo-dad.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is the longest running scripted TV show in the US?
answer - The Simpsons at 29 seasons (Gunsmoke and Law & Order both had 20 yrs)

Different Curves.

The Furniture Record - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 9:52pm

The auction from the last post was not a great auction, there were no wonderous pieces of furniture. Many nice ones but nothing that jumped out and screamed “Take me to the Met.”

In the absence of greatness, I look for interesting details. Things done differently or things not typically done. I always wonder if these different approaches are naive or brilliant. Did they not know how things were done or not care how others did it. No clue or different inspiration

There were a few items that had a unique approach to curves. First up is this:

Chippendale Style Dressing Table

Description:  19th century, oak, shaped dish top, single serpentine drawer, cabriole legs with ball and claw feet.

Size: 29 x 30 x 18 in.

Condition: Restoration including the drawer being reworked, later glue blocks, break and repair to back right leg; insect damage; surface stains.

DSC_7899

This lot has sold for $110.

To start things off, the ball and claw feet are a bit different:

DSC_7905

That’s not how they did it in Newport.

The drawer has been reworked?

DSC_7907

How was it before the reworking. No dovetails yet I took a picture of it.

The serpentine drawer front caught my eye:

DSC_7908

A drawer front you don’t see everyday.

A sawn serpentine drawer front is not unique. What is unique is how thin the drawer front gets:

DSC_7909

it gets down to below 1/2″.

I do like the bail pulls:

DSC_7911

Seems to be original.

Next specimen is quite a bit taller:

William IV Mahogany Bookcase

Description:19th century, two-part form, mahogany, mahogany veneer, oak and pine secondary, applied cove molded cornice, two hinged glazed doors with original wavy glass open to two louvered shelves, over an ogee drawer, two paneled doors with flush base.

Size   94 x 43 x 18 in

Condition: No key; surface wear; top surface to base with looseness.

DSC_7920

Taller than your average bookcase.

The only curved thing on it is the, as they call it, ogee drawer. Looking at is in profile you see:

DSC_7921

Dovetails look kinda funny.

It looks like it started life as a squared drawer to which bits have been added and removed:

DSC_7932

Used to be square.

Staring at it for a while, I think I might have figured out how they did it. It started out as a drawer with a square profile. The baseline looks like it was made by a marking gauge which would require a flat front. Moldings and fillets were attached and the drawer front was then given the ogee profile. The through dovetails were hidden behind a thick veneer on the concave surface.

The third curve is the first kidney-shaped server I’ve ever seen.

English Regency Concave Mahogany Server

Description: 19th century, mahogany, oak secondary, top with applied gallery, two drawers over two tambour doors, shelved interior, on flush base.

Size: 39 x 50 x 22 in.

Condition: Right tambour door with loose panels; surface scratches; shrinkage crack to top; other wear.

DSC_7935

This lot has sold for $400. The figural humidors not included. They sold for $310.

The tambour doors were a bit stiff. Now knowing how the non-existent Pottery Barn Rule (You break it, you bought it)  applies at an auction, I wimped out and chose to use their picture to show it closed:

ConcaveServer

Tambour doors closed.

The joinery might be a bit coarse but it has lasted for 200 years:

DSC_7934

Not perfect nut good enough.

Interesting way that the lower shelf boards installed on a bias:

DSC_7937

Nothing straight about this server.


Easy Wooden Pants Hanger

The Literary Workshop Blog - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 1:33pm

As a professional teacher, I own a lot of dress slacks.  Until recently, I had them hanging on a variety of different hangers, most of which sagged and left unsightly wrinkles on each leg.  There are a lot of effective ways to hang up a pair of slacks without wrinkling them, but most good hangers are expensive and hog valuable space on the rack.  My new pants hangers each cost approximately 75 cents took under five minutes to make.

Making them requires only a few simple woodworking tools and almost no skill.  Here’s how I did it.

I began with some old wire hangers that came from the dry cleaner.  Such hangers are easy to find.  These are have a cardboard tube that each end of the wire sticks into.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

I had most of my slacks hanging on hangers like these.  They worked for a while, until the cardboard began to sag and finally break in the middle.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

I had a lot of them.

You could use regular wire coat hangers for this project just as easily, but I had these ready to hand.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

The first step is to use wire cutters to snip off the lower wire close to each end.  I cut the wire about 3/4″ from each end, but the exact length isn’t critical.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

I also clipped the wire at an angle so as to leave a sharp point.  That will be very helpful later when it comes time to assemble these.  Be careful, though, as cut wire IS very sharp.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

The next step is to cut the new wooden rod to length.  I used 1/2″ diameter poplar dowels from the home center.  They’re often labeled “hardwood dowels,” and the wood often has a slightly green color.  They should run you less than $2 apiece.  I got mine for $1.69 each.

At the store, take some time selecting the straightest dowels you can find.  To test straightness, just sight down the length of each dowel rod.  If they look straight, they are straight enough.  But if you don’t trust your eye, roll them on the floor.  A bent dowel will wobble a lot.  A straight one will roll pretty evenly.

Cut your dowels to 16 inches long.  If you bought 48-inch dowels, you can get exactly three hangers out of each dowel with no waste!  I cut them with a small hand saw and a bench hook–that’s the handy holding device pictured above.  (See the end of this post for more details on making a bench hook.)

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

Next, drill a small hole into each end of the dowel.  You can eyeball the approximate center.  Go as straight as you can, but don’t sweat a crooked or off-center hole.  The hanger will work fine even if your drilling is off a little bit.

I like to stand my stock up in a bench vise, but if you don’t have a vise, you can brace one end of the dowel on something solid, hold the dowel in your hand, and carefully drill the end.  I braced mine onto my bench hook, and it worked great.  Just don’t slip!

Poplar is a fairly soft wood, so use a smaller diameter drill bit than your hanger wire.  I used a 1/16″ bit, but you could go one size bigger without trouble.  The exact depth of the hole is not crucial.  I just drilled to the depth of the drill bit’s flutes.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

The dowels come from the store sanded smooth–which is great if you want them like that.  However, I don’t like my slacks slipping off the hanger and onto the floor at the slightest touch–as they will if the rod is too slick.  So I used a piece of 80-grit sandpaper to roughen the rods a little.  I just swiped the sandpaper down the length of the rod once, turned it slightly, and did it again, until the whole rod was just a little coarse.  Just remember to clean off any sawdust before you hang your slacks on these things.

While you’ve got the sandpaper in your hand, also sand off any ragged fibers that the saw left at each end.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

Now it’s time to assemble your new hanger.  With your fingers, press each cut end of the wire into the holes in each end of the dowel rod as far as you can.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

If you feel they haven’t gone in far enough, a few taps on each end with a hammer will seat the wire firmly.  If the wire doesn’t seem secure, you can always add a dab of strong glue, such as E6000 glue or even hot glue, to each hole.  But that probably won’t be necessary.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

And that’s all there is to it!  Hang up your slacks on your new hanger.

I didn’t use any kind of stain or finish on the wood because (a) I didn’t want to wait for a finish to cure, and (b) I don’t want any smelly or sticky stuff on my clothes.  These are going in my closet anyway, and I really don’t care what color they are.

Wooden Pants Hanger 2017

I made up a dozen of these in under an hour.  It’s probably the easiest woodworking project I’ve done in years–and I’ll use the hangers I made for years to come.

Bonus: The Bench Hook

I use my bench hook all the time.  I actually have two of them, and for cutting up long stock it’s nice to have a pair.  But for small stock, one works just fine all by itself.

A bench hook is simple to make, and almost as simple to use.  Each one consists of three pieces of wood.  The base is a wide-ish board 3/4″ thick.  Mine is about 8″ wide and 12″ long, but exact dimensions aren’t critical.  You could easily build this with smaller pieces–whatever you have on hand.

 

Bench Hook 2017

The other two pieces are they cleats.  They are narrower bits of wood, almost as long as the base.  They can be screwed, nailed, or glued to the base, as you see above.  Mine are glued on.  If you’re right-handed, the smaller piece should go almost to the right-hand end of the base but not quite.  Leave between 1″ and 1/2″ of the base protruding past the cleats.

To use the bench hook, the lower cleat hooks over the top of a workbench or table.  You hold your stock against the upper cleat with your off-hand, and you saw with your dominant hand.  I have two sawing spots in this bench hook–one on the end and the other in the middle.  The one in the middle is best for very small pieces that need to be supported on both sides of the saw.  I use the spot on the end for everything else.

Bench Hook 2017

When one side of the bench hook gets too chewed up to use–which will take quite a long time–you can flip the whole bench hook over and use the other side.  This essentially doubles the working life if the jig.

The saw I’m using is a cheap dovetail saw made by crown, which I think retails for about $25.  But any normal, sharp saw with relatively small teeth can be used effectively on a bench hook.  With practice, you can hold a workpiece firmly and saw a clean, straight line with ease–no clamping required.

If you do much craft work at all, I highly recommend investing the fifteen minutes it will take you to make one or two bench hooks.


It’s All About Backboards – 360w360 E.247

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 4:44am
It’s All About Backboards – 360w360 E.247

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking as the Labor Day Weekend holiday approaches and we plan time with our families, I decided to revisit an “Around the Shop” podcast that discussed backboards. It’s solid woodworking information with an eye toward historically accurate work.

Join 360 Woodworking every Thursday for a lively discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more). Glen talks with various guests about all things woodworking and some things that are slightly off topic.

Continue reading It’s All About Backboards – 360w360 E.247 at 360 WoodWorking.

plow plane box pt IV.......

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 1:27am
There is an old adage that says haste makes waste. That is true most of the time but I would add that mistakes are usually tagging along behind the waste. I accomplished all three tonight. I worked in haste initially, made a mistake, and ended up with some waste. I was trying to get too much done in too short of the time allotted and I paid the price. Oh well, I have suffered worse intracranial flatulence attacks and survived.

lid choices
 I went with the smaller board because it would have less waste.

both have cathedral grain I will use
sawn to rough length but not the width
I want to center the width on the point of the cathedral between the sides of the box
the haste, waste, and mistake part
I did get the width centered on the cathedral and I got a snug fit between the sides. But I forgot to add the rabbet that goes in the groove.

repeated the cathedral thing with the second lid
This time I did include the rabbet for the lid and it is 2 frog hairs too wide, groove to groove.

labeled the front so I won't get it mixed up(on both faces)
I have the point of the cathedral pointing to the front of the box. I squared the back end to fit up against the back.

left the front long
Once I had the rabbets made and fitted, I trimmed the front end flush.

planing the rabbets
These rabbets were a bit on the large size and I could have sawn them out and saved some time but I opted to plane them. I need the practice and so far I'm doing good.

a teeny bit of a slope on the entry end
none on the exit end
pretty even on the gauge line too
I don't have my usual 'ramped' in/out planing nor a hump in the middle. I got the same results on the opposite side when I planed it. I am slowly getting better with making rabbets by hand.

I'll plane to this gauge line after I fit the rabbets
about 80% on the second try
This is one area where I don't haste at all. I've learned my lesson here from past fittings and I go slowly, like molasses flowing in the winter. I look at the lid front and back frequently as I fit it.

right front - loose on the side and at the top
left front - loose on the side and tight at the top
the back right
This is a little harder to see what is what but it appears the top of the rabbet is tight to the top. I can see a bit of a gap on the side.

the left side is a close repeat of the right
This is where I take thin wispy shavings and do frequent checks. I gradually snuck up on getting the lid fitted.

I could probably close it but I' wasn't sure that I could open it again
finally got it
I can open and close the lid without a finger grab. I may have to plane the rabbets deeper because I want to put some shellac on this box. The shellac build up will cause the lid to bind.


marked the lid and planed it to the line - left it a frog hair proud
planing a chamfer on the front end
I am doing the chamfer first because an astragal is next. If I do the astragal first I will get blowout when I do the chamfer. It took me two lids done that way before I started doing it this way.


done

I don't like the knife point edge so I do it this way. I think the flat not only is a better visual presentation, it is stronger and less prone to chipping or breaking on the edge.

1/2" astragal batted next
grain reversed on this end
I got a little chipping and few divots on the bead on this side but there wasn't much I could have done to avoid it. I went at it as slow as could to minimize it.

layout for the thumb catch
I should have done the layout for this before I did the front chamfer and the astragals. I had a hard time getting a square on this because of the chamfer and astragals being in the way.   I did most it of by eye.

don't know what I want here
I am not sure if I want a bevel on this or a round over. I like the round over and I think it will hold up better than a bevel. I'll have to wait and see what shakes out with this tomorrow.

it's 1700 and quitting time
I'll finish the cleanup of the exterior tomorrow and start making the doo-dads for the plane and the other parts.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is an anglophone?
answer - someone who speaks english

Show Us Your Shop: Peek Inside These Woodworkers’ Shops!

Highland Woodworking - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 8:00am

Over the last year, we have featured a wide variety shops in Wood News. We recently collected a few from the archives, including Scott Wilson’s spacious home shop, Tony Rumball’s shop options (he has access to 3 different woodworking shops!) and more.

Take a look at these workshops for ideas and inspiration, or just for fun.

And to read about even more shops, click to check out our Shops Gallery.

If you would like to submit your shop, just SEND US PHOTOS of your woodworking shop along with captions and a brief history and description of your woodworking. (Email photos at 800 x 600 resolution.) Receive a $50 store credit redeemable towards merchandise if we show your shop in a future issue.

The post Show Us Your Shop: Peek Inside These Woodworkers’ Shops! appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Carved panel designs

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 7:52am
final panel for bedstead

I just finished carving the 8th & final panel for the bedstead I have underway. There’s 4 patterns I used, each one repeats twice. most of them are patterns I made up, but drawn from a large body of work I have covered here a few times. The carvings that are the inspiration come from Devon, England and Ipswich, Massachusetts. I love these designs because they are so lively, and have so much variety.

Lately I’ve been trying to draw the designs – to try to learn how to talk about them – the parts, components and how they get combined. When I first saw these panels, I thought they must be the most involved carvings – but really they’re just busy…there’s very little background removed. Most of the impact is from the “horror vacuui” effect of covering every blessed surface with something. (This next one was a mistake – the board was 10″ wide, too narrow for the bedstead.)

Narrow panel

These patterns have a few common elements/motifs – most have an arch across the top of the panel. there are a few exceptions, but generally I carve the arch-top versions. All of these have an urn/vase/flowerpot just above the bottom/center of the panel. Then some leafy bits/leaves/flowers coming up and spreading out from this urn.   I tend to think of the designs being broken into thirds – though not necessarily even thirds.

Some wind up from the urn through the middle of the panel, then wind outward and reverse direction into the arch. Mostly these also bend downward, looping back toward the middle of the panel. In this case, there’s 3 tulip shapes inside this arc, then the big leafy bit that fills the bottom corner:

This pattern is easiest on wide stock, at least 10″ of carving space-width. This one, a chest I have copied a few times, the panel is 12 3/4″  wide x 15″ tall. Compare it to the narrow version above – I think it works better on the wide stock.

On this panel from the bedstead a single flower replaces the 3 tulips, same leaf at the bottom though:

Sometimes from the urn you get large shapes flowing almost horizontally out from the middle. these often have double-volute-ish scrolls where they hit the edges of the panel The one heading down then flows into a leaf shape that bends right against the bottom of the urn. This one is from the extra-wide muntin of the same chest –

Here’s the front of that chest – I copied the proportions and all the vertical bits from 2 examples I’ve seen in person, one other I know from a photograph. All were initialed & dated on the muntin; 1666, 1669 & 1682 for the dates. I substituted different (related) designs on the horizontal rails; and in this case added brackets underneath the bottom rail.

 

These carving often employ a three-part leaf, which is standard in the related S-scrolls – (seen here on a period box from Ipswich)

 

 

and on the panels this form is used again & again, inside spaces, between elements – it can be like this:

or like this part, just before it winds into the bottom of the arch:

 

Or along the side of the panel:

Hard to see it upside down, here it is from a period piece, the shape I’m thinking of is between the bottom of the arch and blends into the margin just above the large bottom leaves:

The bits flowing up from the urn that then turn down to the bottom corners can take several forms as well. The one I used at the top of this post is simple, big fat leafy shapes bending up then down. They split into three parts at the bottom – one to the corner, one to the feet/urn junction, and one between. Fill the spaces with gouge-cuts, and call it done.

as a drawing:

And carved:

I could go on forever, but this post has taken long enough. A few more panels of my work:

This one hangs in our kitchen, done in Alaska yellow cedar:

This oak panel was an experiment, I mostly like it, but rejected it for the bedstead:

This one took its place:

Here’s an example (a combination of 2 period carvings) of one of these panels without an arch:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


To Mordor and Back

The Barn on White Run - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 5:32am

A couple weeks ago I ventured into the barbarous climes of Mordor to deliver the workbench to the Library of Congress Book Conservation group.  If the traffic and multitude of high-dollar construction projects are any indication, the travails of the provinces are not being felt in the capital city.  In fact it looks like a boom town that has four trillion of our dollars at its disposal every year.  And since we apparently are not motivated enough to demand that they stop spending those four trillion dollars every year on us, that trend line will remain unchanged.

The logistics of getting into a secured facility (and in Mordor virtually every facility is secured) is a challenge.  It turned out that the most efficient way to get the workbench into LC was for me to drop it off at the curb in front, with LC staff taking delivery of it there.  Once I parked and rejoined them we were able to get through the security checkpoint and proceed to the conservation lab.  Admittedly, I felt under dressed with my Victorinox Spirit muti-tool sitting in the van outside.

The path to the final home for the workbench was uneventful, and the crew there was delighted to get their new tool.  Particularly pleased were the petite members of the staff, many of whom wrote me a “Thank You” note for taking their physiques into consideration when fabricating the variable height configuration of the bench.

The bench fit perfectly into the tiny Tool Room space they have, and after I spent a little time explaining its features it was given some tryouts almost immediately.

And then I escaped before the Dark Eye poisoned my heart any more.

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