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General Woodworking

Live Edge Class at Snow Farm, Massachusetts – Part 1

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - 7 hours 7 min ago

  On Columbus day weekend I taught a live-edge furniture class at Snow Farm, a reputable New England based craft school located in the picturesque Berkshire mountains of Western Massachusetts. My six students faced a challenging task, to design and build furniture that presents a strong live-edge character, and to do so just in two and a half days of work. The weather was mostly nice and the food was […]

The post Live Edge Class at Snow Farm, Massachusetts – Part 1 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

6 alternatives to the 140 trick......

Accidental Woodworker - 7 hours 55 min ago
After I got home tonight I rushed into the house and grabbed my packages and headed for the Post Office to mail them out. In my haste I forgot the address for the backsaw. The molding planes had been addressed and ready to go all week. So I had to go back home and get the address and go back to the PO. This actually turned out to be good thing. The first time I went the parking lot was full and on the return trip there were no cars. In and out in a few and back home to try out my 140 alternatives.

I came up with 6 different ways to make the rabbet like I did with the LN 140 yesterday. I didn't do the 140 again, so I now have 7 total ways to make the rabbet for dovetails. I could have had 8 but I forgot to make one with the plow plane. If I remember I'll try and make one with it this weekend.

the first batter
I thought about this today and I decided to go with it as the first choice. I am a hand tool woodworker and I should be able to do this with hand tools. I thought of using a handsaw too but I didn't need it because the rabbet isn't that deep.  One marking gauge set the distance from the edge and the other was used to mark the depth.

depth marked
made a knife wall
removed waste going against the grain
I did this until I had evened out the rabbet from the knife wall to the edge.

within a frog hair of the gauge line
making it flat
First step is to lay the chisel in the gauge line and chop upwards from R to L.  Or L to R if you are left handed. Or you could melt down because you are in the midst of an OCD attack and can't decide.

go straight in to the shoulder

left side

middle
right side
came out pretty good
I have been using chisels more lately but I was surprised by how well I did on this. There is a faint bit of the depth line still visible. To the eye this looks even, flat, and square. I'm pretty sure that this would work but it but the real test is to do 3 more of these the same.

batting second
I ran a gauge line first and then made a knife wall.

second step was setting the iron
To the set the iron so that it projects past the side I lay it on the outboard side of the plane. Loosen the iron and it will project on the side that will be up against the shoulder. Tighten the iron and you're ready to plane.

run the plane in the knife line
The plan was to lay the plane in the knife wall titled at a 45° or more to inboard and plane. With each stroke I would bring the plane back up to 90°. That kind of worked and it didn't work.


looks a lot worse than it is
At a 45 on the first plane stroke, the iron rubbed on the top of the shoulder and blew it out a tiny bit.

cleaned up
Ratty looking but it will work.

third batter
Gauge line and knife wall were done first.

setting the iron is second
no planing in the knife wall first
I planed to the outside of the knife wall until I had a bit of depth and a shoulder. Once I had that I ran the plane up against the shoulder and completed the rabbet.

no blowout this time
The right side is off just a hair high. A couple of more passes fixed that.

fixed
batting cleanup
Same first steps as the previous two. Except setting the iron is done with the sole of the plane on the bench. I loosened the lever cap and set the iron projection by feeling it with my fingertip.

planed away from the knife wall until I had a shoulder established
got a bit of blowout on the exit side
I think I could have avoided this if I had planed a bit deeper first. In my past uses of the 10 1/2 I don't recall getting blowout like this. I also didn't make a knife wall but just starting planing the rabbet bare.

done
batting 5th
This plane has the advantage of a depth stop but I don't like using it. It is hard to set and have it hold unless you use pliers. Being a skew, it makes a clean cut on end grain.


setting the iron on the knife line
Setting this fence to a precise spot is a hit and mostly miss affair. I do it by slightly tightening one nut on one fence rod, then tapping the fence until it ends up where I want it. Here I want the top right corner to be just to the outside of the knife line.

deeper than the others
I removed the depth stop so I could better see the iron while I tried to set it up. I forgot to put it back on and before I knew it, I was this deep. This plane has a smooth action and it will remove a lot of wood in a hurry. This will work but I think this is too deep for the 140 trick.


batting last
I have used this before to make and clean up stopped rabbets. Here I'm going to use the fence and see if it will work making a '140 rabbet'.

working somewhat
There isn't a lot of plane real estate hanging out on the board. The router was tippy and I had to concentrate on keeping it flat on the board. The fence was another attention grabber. It is short and way to easy too cock in either direction. And it would cock way before I could get an 'aw shit' out of the pie hole. It worked but I ended up with a slightly bumpy rabbet.


the LN router rabbet
There is a slight hump in the board and that translated into the middle of the rabbet being higher than the two ends. The lead in on the right is also not as low as the rest of the rabbet.

the rankings
either of these could be swapped
I picked the LV #2 due mostly because it is skewed, has a fence, and a depth stop.


I like the long length of the 073 vs the bullnose
the next to last ones
I would have rated the chisel higher but demoted it because it isn't as easy to do as the others. Doing one is ok but a dovetail box requires 4 rabbets. It would take the longest of all the methods. I will try doing it on shop box just to see if I can do it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Andy Griffith graduated from UNC in 1949 with a degree in what?
answer - music

Book Giveaway: Wooden Toys

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 5:51am
Wooden Toys

Last night my kids unearthed a Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer book for a bedtime story. I desperately tried to steer them back toward our wide selection of Halloween books that I’ve arranged prominently on their bookshelf. But alas, while they’re excited for Halloween, the inevitable holiday season looms large on the horizon like the Death Star in Rogue One. Apparently I need to get my holiday planning underway. And so, […]

The post Book Giveaway: Wooden Toys appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

in and out real quick.......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 12:51am
Made a decision to send the new (to me) back saw out to be sharpened. I could probably do it but I doubt I would be able to do with any competency worth more than a bucket of spit. I do think that I can the follow on and maintain the saw afterward.  I got the email sent and I am just waiting permission to ship it.

Making the box for it tonight is all I did. I gave up trying to find cardboard boxes a long time ago. Besides cardboard could be easily punctured and maybe in the wrong spot. I can only remembering sending out one saw in a cardboard box many, many lunar eclipses ago. It was a nightmare cutting and making new flaps because I had to cut down a larger box. Making a specific box out of wood is a no brainer to me.

french fit in foam insulation
I thought I would be clever and french fit the saw in this. I traced the outline of the saw and followed that up with a knife cut made with a sheet rock blade. This insulation was the packing in the box that my #6 came in from Timeless Tools & Treasures.  I would have used this insulation and that box but the box is on it's way to China by now and I was left with the insulation.

not cooperating
I can very easily make a downward cut with the chisel but one laterally is not working. This foam will saw quicker than a hot knife going through butter but balks at being chiseled. It doesn't like evacuation work with a chisel at all. I thought of heating the chisel and doing it that way but I wasn't sure of the fumes. I wouldn't want to wake up tomorrow with a third eye in the middle of my forehead.


saw packed up
 I used a scrap piece of pressure treated fence picket for the sides and 1/4" flooring plywood for the top and bottom. It's the same construction as the one I made for the panel rip saw.

almost ready to go
I have to get the ok for this, put the to and from addresses on a piece of paper in the inside, add few more screws, and I can ship it. The panel saw cost me $11.60 priority and if I had used priority boxes it would have cost $13 and change.  I don't expect this to cost much more than what the panel saw was.

Tomorrow I am going to try the 140 trick employing some of my other planes. I got a comment about making it with the Lee Valley skew rabbet plane which I don't doubt would work. I'll remove all doubt tomorrow on that and try a few other tools.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Which US President was taught to read and write by his wife?
answer - Andrew Johnson our 17th president

Video: Circle Jig for the Band Saw

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 12:14pm

Band saws are great for cutting curves but when you need a perfect circle, you need a jig. I’ve used many circle-cutting helpers over the years and the design presented by Tom Caspar in the video below combines the best features from all of them. The jig is held in place on the band saw table using a bar in the miter slot and it features an adjustable pivot point […]

The post Video: Circle Jig for the Band Saw appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

How to Read, by an Oak-snob

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 11:14am

I’ve been slow to add stuff to the blog here. Time to correct some of that. Today’s chore is splitting up some leftover bits of oak, and some newly dropped-off bits. Here’s how I read these, and how I decide what to split from a few different bolts. the first one is an old one, been split & hanging around a long time, over a year I’d say. It was given to me about 2 months ago. Free wood is sometimes not worth it. this is one of those cases. Note how the radial plane is cupped. This isn’t from drying, it’s the way the tree grew. The medullary rays curve from the center of the tree to the bark. So if I want wide flat stuff from this, I have my work cut out for me. What I do with such a piece of wood depends on several things: what I need at the time, how much effort I want to put into it, and how much other wood I have around. These days, wood is in pretty good supply, time much less so. Thus, I want to get the best piece I can from this as quickly as possible.

The ruler shows how “un-flat” the split is.

The piece was 26″ long, but with the checking at each end, I expect to get about 22″ length out of it. Just right for a joined stool stile (leg). So I opted to split a 2″x 2″ square out from right below the sapwood. First split with the froe gets off the inner twisted bits.

Next I split off the sapwood & bark. Surprise, the sapwood sheared off across the grain. Usually a log that has been around this long has punky rotten sapwood – I expect that. But to shear off like that means there’s something underneath…

And there was – some deformity curving the grain near one end. So didn’t get my 2″ x 2″ x 22″ stile. The resulting piece could be a ladderback chair front post (something I want to build, but have no time for right now. I’ve made parts for 3 of them so far this fall.) or the leg to a workbench out in the yard. I already have maybe 4 of those benches. On to the next split.

This one’s big & fresh. Just came in yesterday. Bark looks good. Very wide bolt, maybe 12″ or more.

But a big knot creating disturbed grain all around it, the full bottom third or more.

I always am working between getting the biggest piece (widest) I can, or getting the best piece of wood I can. Usually I want the best one. Which in this case, is much narrower than what I first expected from a section like this. See the ruler here, the best (straightest, flattest, least-work) piece is from the 10″ mark to 15″. So that’s what I split.

 

Now the distorted stuff is isolated in the right-hand section, destined for firewood.

Then I further split the remaining stuff into four thin boards for carved boxes, or narrow panels for the sides of some chests. Once I don’t think about where they came from, these are excellent clear, straight boards. This is a case of free wood that is worth it.

One of the older bits looked promising: wide, maybe 7″ or more. 24″ long.

But when I sighted down its length, lots of twist from one end to the other. I didn’t shoot it well enough, but you can generally read the twist down at the far end. Its right hand corner is high, as is the left corner nearest us. Means some hewing before planing. Not fatal, but maybe there’s better wood out here.

Yup. Fresh too. (that means easier to work…) Shorter, but wider.

When I scooch down and sight its radial plane, dead flat! That’s the stuff I’m after…

Gonna have lunch and find some more like this one.

 

Want to learn more about how to read these logs – Plymouth CRAFT has a weekend class coming up that’s just the ticket.  https://www.plymouthcraft.org/riving-hurdlemaking-weekend

Riving, hewing, drawknife work. Me, Rick McKee ( https://www.instagram.com/medullary_rick/  and https://blueoakblog.wordpress.com/  ) and our friend Pret Woodburn will show you all we know about opening oak logs and what to do with them.

 

 


Adventures in Teaching a Woodworking Class

Bob Lang's ReadWatchDo - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 11:10am
Last week I was at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking teaching a dozen woodworkers how to make a chair. Usually when I teach I write about the class ahead of time, but this was different from the norm. I Continue reading →
Categories: General Woodworking

The Highland Woodturner: Rotary Texturing Tools

Highland Woodworking - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 8:00am

In the October 2017 issue of The Highland Woodturner, Curtis Turner takes a closer look at the Rotary Texturing Tools available at Highland.

I have other types of texturing tools and enjoy using them, so I was eager to try out something new. I have only had these a short time, however, it is clear to me these tools can easily add new embellishments to a range of turned wood items. They are so simple to use and there is virtually no learning curve.

Click here to read more of Curtis’s review of the Rotary Texturing Tools.

The post The Highland Woodturner: Rotary Texturing Tools appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Dave Campbell Tells All About “Weekend With Wood” – 360w360 E.254

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 4:10am
Dave Campbell Tells All About “Weekend With Wood” – 360w360 E.254

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking, Dave Campbell, Wood Magazine’s Editorial Content Chief, gives us a behind-the-scenes look at Weekend With Wood, happening in May 2018. He tells us why, in his opinion, this event is so successful. Plus, he shares all the happenings included with the spouse’s event that runs at the same time.

Join 360 Woodworking every Thursday for a lively discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more).

Continue reading Dave Campbell Tells All About “Weekend With Wood” – 360w360 E.254 at 360 WoodWorking.

it worked.....

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 1:30am
I read Ken Hatch's blog post on the 140 trick but he didn't show the inside of the dovetails. Seeing that was what I wanted to see.  It was all I could think about at work today. When I got home I had to rush and make a sample dovetail joint. I got to see that it worked and then I went and did my errands. No since risking the wrath of the bride is there?


my toe stubs
If I had continued to file this I would have filed the toe and heel down to flat nothings. I would not know what the tooth spacing was and that is why I stopped here.

the heel
The toe and heel are pretty much in the same line with a big dip in the middle of the saw.

the middle of the saw
As you can see I have about 2 1/2 inches to go to get it flat end to end. I got a couple of comments yesterday that said to file the nubs to increase the gullets and then file the tooth line flat again. Repeat as necessary until the tooth line is flat and straight toe to heel. I'll try to do this on saturday or sunday.

setting the 140
When I do dovetails I shoot for getting them flush or just a frog hair or two proud. I set the right most corner of the iron on inside of the knife line.

I'm guessing this is maybe a 32nd deep
I'll try this first and see how it works. I still don't see a need for this to be much deeper, if any, than this.

cutting the tails
I had to try this doing the tails. It was so-so. The deeper I sawed, the more it balked but I was able to saw them all. I did the pins with my dovetail saw.

off square on this half pin
This isn't that important here and it was a different saw than I normally do dovetails with. I could correct this with a chisel but I left it as it is. Closing the interior of joint is what I'm shooting for.

tails done
I can see the step down I did with the 140 from side to side.

an added bennie
As a registration this works very well. The placement is solid and it is square in both directions - across and from end to end. This will be very beneficial when doing 1/2 blinds.


setting the pin depth
At first I thought I wouldn't be able to set the depth of the pin sockets. But by placing one face of the dovetails flush with the end, I had the depth of the pins which I marked with a pencil first. After I had sawn the pins I repeated this and used a marking knife instead of a pencil.

not too bad for hurrying
 This side doesn't look too bad considering but it is the interior that I am concerned about.

tumultuous joy and dancing in the streets abounded
I have found a new way to do dovetails such that the interior of them looks as well as the exterior. Both parts are closed up and gap free.

half pin is gappy
The tail and pin sockets are gap free.

planed them flush and glued it
the 140's nicker
I think this is useless. I tried to use on this but I didn't see the knife line. I made the knife line with a square and a marking knife. I could feel the knicker beneath the sole with my finger tip (it's retracted now) but I saw and sensed nothing trying to use it. Just as well as I have intention of using it.

glued and cooking
I labeled this and I'll put it with my other practice joinery. This will give me something to look back at and compare to what I'm doing now.

I didn't hesitate at all
I saw this on Jim Bode's tool site and I bought it immediately. I didn't think about pulling the trigger on it all.  I lost out on one plane because I thought about it and this is a plane I have wanted for a while.

finally got the pair
I got the #9 years ago and now I have it's sibling, the #60 1/2 ( in front).

nice fluffy shavings
the adjustable shoe works easily
sole is in decent shape
It has a few stains on it but no deep scratches, dings, or dents.

spin wheel
The wheel runs in and out squarely. These wheels bend and distort way to quickly when dropped on the bench or the deck. And also when someone cranks it down too far onto the iron.


iron looks good and has plenty of life left to it
back of the iron
It looks like the back was flattened. I'll check it again when I sharpen and the hone the iron my way.

precise adjuster
I got this replacement adjuster from an Australian site. There is something about it that is better then what LN has. There is zero backlash in it and it advances and retracts precisely. Derek Cohen put it out in one of his blogs and I'll check his site to find it again. I will check this on the new plane before I buy another one.

no room for it with it's mate
I will have to rearrange this end of the plane storage. I can make a shelf unit and possibly fit all the the block planes including the 102 & 103, the violin plane and maybe some other planes in it. Might be the next project out of the gate.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
This started in July of 1943. What was it?
answer - federal income being withheld from paychecks

Pop Wood Group Project: Magnetic Picture Rails

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 8:41am

Last week, Marissa Bowers (our wonderful designer, who’s been helping us out while we seek a new permanent art director) mentioned she had been looking for a set of picture rails – and wondered aloud if it was something we could build in the shop. Ever eager for an excuse to bring everyone out to the shop, we decided that everyone in the office could use their own, and I (Brendan […]

The post Pop Wood Group Project: Magnetic Picture Rails appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

one more day of rest......

Accidental Woodworker - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 1:07am
The hands felt a lot better today. No twinges and by mid morning I had no more aches. I am still going to take it easy for another day. The rehab of the #6 planes can wait a little while longer. I'm sure they aren't looking forward to what is upcoming. I have plenty of things I can do while I rest and heal.

wavy tooth line
I put the saw back in the vise and started to work on the problem areas I marked yesterday. Some of them I fixed and others will have to wait and catch up. Tonight I'm seeing a few spots where a couple of teeth are higher then their neighbors.

Mt Everest
How did I miss this wavy undulating tooth line last night. I thought I had done a pretty good job but tonight I can see it is mostly crappola.

whoa big doggie
I thought I would file the high teeth back down to match the others in the line and then sharpen it again. No wonder my tooth line looks like crap. A dog's hind leg is straighter than this saw. It had not occurred to me to check for this first. This roller coaster tooth line explains why my teeth are so uneven.

I like this one
This is what I used to joint the tooth line the first time. Not a good choice considering the dipsy doodles I have in this saw. As an side, if anyone knows of a source for short files like this please leave a comment.

Lee Valley file jointer.
This is long enough to bridge some of the hills and valleys. I should be able to even out the tooth line but it may take a while.

it' better but not complete
The file is evening out the tooth line but the problem is I won't have any teeth left at the toe and the heel by the time I get to the mid section. The teeth are almost gone at the toe and heel with just the bottom of the gullets left. I don't have the skills to file a complete set of new teeth from nothing. I will have to find someone who can punch me a new set of teeth. That is the only way I can see of fixing this.

makes rip cuts easily
I looked at this saw under the magnifying glass and I am still not 100% sure of how it is filed. From the side it looks like a rip.  Looking at it from the side it kind of looks like a crosscut but it doesn't have the angles a crosscut has. There is also very little discernible set.

a couple of shoulder cuts
I am going with a rip cut. It didn't like sawing these shallow crosscut shoulders at all. The rip cut was smooth and fluid and the crosscuts were hesitant and jerky. Now I have to decide if I want to try and file this myself or send it out.

I'm leaning in the direction of sending it out and having it filed properly. The tooth line on this saw isn't perfect either. It is almost straight and there aren't any missing teeth.  If a pro does it I'm sure I can follow on that and keep it in good shape.

never thought of doing this before
I ran all three of my tite marks over the 8K stone and it made a difference.

nice clean knife line - sharp cures another problem
trying out the 140 again
I knew I should have removed the side plate last night but I wanted to see how it felt and what she could do. Doing it the right way felt real good.

nice clean shoulder
I would think that I wouldn't need to make the rabbet any deeper than this for dovetails?

side plate
This didn't come off as easily as I thought it should. Maybe it needs to cycled off and on a bunch of times to loosen up a bit. It went back on without any problems but still stiff removing it for the second time.

no slant to outboard on this practice run
slanted across the width
Put too much pressure on the heel of the plane doing the start of the cut.

corrected - flat, straight, and even end to end
the action of the plane is very sweet
skew blocks for the LN honing guide
Deneb says that this iron has to be done free hand or with the jaws that fit the iron. These are the ones I bought to do the LN skew chisels. I'll have to check the LN website to see if I need to buy a set for this iron. If I remember right they offer a 30° and 18° set of honing guide blocks.

I like this saw
I can't saw this good with my LN tenon saw. I like the feel and action of this saw a lot. I think it may become my go to tenon saw. It has thicker plate, more weight, and for me it makes it easier to saw a truer cut.

found a box for the 140
lots of room
shucks
The shaft for the fence is too long to stow upright (the way I want it). The lid won't close with it this way. I would have started on making a new box for it tonight but I don't have any stock. I have 1/2" thick poplar but I prefer pine for my shop boxes. I'll have to make a run to Pepin Lumber and get some 1/2" pine. I hope that they still have some to sell.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was Juan Sebastian Elcano?
answer - he was the first person to circumnavigate the world (He assumed command after Magellan was killed in the Philippines)

2×4 Lumber Lawsuit Dismissed

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:38pm

In my November 2017 editor’s note, I wrote about two $5,000,000 lawsuits filed against Menard’s and Home Depot for “false and misleading advertising” for selling 2×4 lumber that isn’t actually 2″ x 4″. You can read that here, if you like. Last night, Nicholas Vanaria (a friend from Instagram) let me know that the suit against Menard’s was dismissed. U.S. District Judge Edmond Change threw out the case on October 6. […]

The post 2×4 Lumber Lawsuit Dismissed appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Washington desk day 1.

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 12:16pm

I woke up on Sunday morning feeling a little under the weather. My back was a little stiff, I had a headache, and I didn’t sleep very well on top of it. I almost put my Washington’s Desk project on hold, but I knew that if I didn’t get started I probably never would. So I cleared out the garage and got to work.

The plan was to mill up enough material for the desk top, the breadboard ends, the legs, as well as cleats for the desktop underside and the cross stretcher. So I chose 3 boards, two 6 footers and one 4 footer (all of the boards were 12 inches wide by 1 inch thick). To mill down those boards I used my Ryobi surface planer. For the record, this isn’t what I consider a great or even good tool. I purchased it almost 14 years ago while doing a kitchen remodel. It does the job, but it is loud and messy. Nonetheless, I had to work with the tools I have, so I checked the blades, and they were reasonably sharp, so I started milling.

What made this such an arduous process was the collection of the shavings. Because I rarely use power tools, I don’t have a dust collector or even a large shop vac. The shop vac I do have is perfectly fine for cleaning out a car or keeping a workbench clear, but it is not made for large scale work. But once again I had to use what was available, and it was not fun. Initially, I was hoping to finish up with two boards just over 7/8” thick for the top and one board just over ¾” thick for the legs. But, I underestimated the amount of material I needed to remove. The boards I was working with were very rough sawn, as in just a shade beyond still having bark. So I had to remove nearly ¼” of material just to get down to usable boards that were flat. And it also meant a lot of starting and stopping to empty out the shop vac. I was actually sore from the constant bending over to pick up the shavings, which I did at the very least fifty times. In the end, I filled up an entire lawn bag with shavings.

IMG_2787 (002)

The desktop boards after the initial milling.

 

After the boards were milled I used the table saw to trim the two boards for the desk top to rough width and length (as well as getting rid of planer snipe). I then aligned the boards for a nice grain pattern (at least to my eye), and trimmed the boards to very near final size. To join the boards I decided to match-plane them.

IMG_2788 (002)

The set up for match planing

Match planing works well, especially if your plane is set properly. I used a strange sequence: jointer plane first, a couple of passes with a jack plane set to take gossamer thin shavings, jointer again, and then one final pass with the jack. I’m not sure how other woodworkers match-plane, but when I am able to take a full width, full length shaving from both boards I call it joined. And in a surprisingly short time the boards were ready to be glued. I am very happy with the joint, as it was air tight, and the top is thankfully nice and flat. It will take a good amount of plane work and sanding, and probably some scraping as well (there are a few funky grain spots) to get the top ready for finish, but I should have a top ¾ thick when all is said and done, which is a bit less than I wanted, but hardly the end of the world.

IMG_2789 (002)

A surprisingly small amount of shavings

At that point, I decided to call it a day. There was a lot, and I mean a lot, of clean up to do. In fact, I spent nearly as much time setting up and cleaning up as I did woodworking. This coming weekend I am hoping to get the legs sawn to finish length and width, the breadboard ends ready, and with a little luck I may possibly have the entire base and desk top ready for assembly. I was a little worried over laying out the legs, but I figured out a simple solution that I will detail in my next post.

IMG_2791 (002)

The panel glued-up.

 

 

 

 

 


Categories: General Woodworking

Product Video: European Workbench

Highland Woodworking - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 8:00am

If you’ve been looking for an affordable workbench to take your shop to the next level, look no further than the European Workbench, available at Highland Woodworking.

In the video below, Morton shows off the diverse capabilities of the European Workbench.

The post Product Video: European Workbench appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

another day of rest.......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 1:25am
My thumbs hurt all day long, especially my master right one. I'll admit I haven't been a good little boy with taking my blue pills so I'm paying the price. As I am typing this I am getting an occasional twinge of pain. Early today I was seriously thinking of going home but stayed. My fingers would have hurt the same at home as they did at work. So I'll be doing less intensive finger things in the shop and I will start taking my twice daily blue pills.

this is past due
Evaporarust usually has a greenish tint to it and this is jet black. This isn't any good so I'll dump it and I'll have to buy another jug of it. The only place I've found it in my area is at an auto parts store.

every shop needs a few different sizes of these
there's the yoke pin
I haven't lost any parts down the drain since I started using this. And it's nylon so no rust problems.

all blown dry
A blow dryer in the shop is another good thing to have.

a moment of weakness
I've  been reading about and getting comments on making a shallow rabbet for the tail board to close up gaps on dovetails. Ken Hatch recently wrote about Alan Peter's 140 trick using this block plane. I had passed on one of these a few months ago and I should have bought it. This was $225 new from LN and the one I passed on was $100.


Gaps on the inside of dovetails bug me for whatever reason. I think what is causing it is I'm moving my knife line ever so slightly as I chop. I have come close a few times with almost no gaps but I have yet to do any 100% gap free. I got this for the fixing the gaps more than for registration. I also got it because Deneb said it will make bread board ends.


it's a heavy one too (one kilo)
run a gauge line
I figured it out
I like these mini tite mark gauges a lot but I was having problems with the wheel cutters. They were disintegrating on me. First a few chips and then big chunks of it went MIA. I didn't know what was wrong or what was causing it. The problem was me and my ham fisted marking pressure. The cutters are fine and do what they are designed to do - make a clean precise knife line - without a lot of downward pressure exerted on them. I had stopped using them and switched to old wooden marking gauges.

The problem was me digging into the wood too hard with gauge. My attempt to make the line as deep as I could was too much for the gauge. I just happened to look at the cutter wheel as I was trying to make a deeper line and I saw the cutter wheel peel off like a shaving coming up through the mouth of a plane.So I think if I let up on the depth of the line, my cutter wheels should last. I forgot to add them to the LN order when I bought the 140 block plane.

I am not doing something right here
I had watched LN's You Tube video on this plane and Deneb said that it is a finicky plane to set up. I had it set too deep on my initial try. I would have bet a lung I was good on that but I wasn't. Once I got it set I did make fluffy and wispy shavings.

slanted
This is what happens with every new plane I use. I'll continue to practice and I'll get it.

I think I made a mistake in not removing the right side plate on the plane. That would allow the iron to get up tight into the bottom of the rabbet. The shoulder on this looks like crap and it should be crisp and clean.

better on the second run
The shoulder still looks like crap so I'm sure that the side plate should be removed . Removing the side plate will also give me access to the knicker. I'll try that out tomorrow.

new saw for Miles's toolbox
a carcass saw?
The top saw is my sash saw and the bottom one is my LN cross cut carcass saw. I think this Disston #4 saw will do ok as a carcass saw. I'll look it up and see what it's original use was.

ripped ok but the saw is dull
hard to crosscut
I really struggled making this crosscut in 3/4" pine. It bound and stuck seemingly on every other stroke. I finally made it through but it was a workout.

the teeth look like crap (Disston #4)
It is hard to tell if this is a rip or a crosscut. I felt very little set as I run my fingers down the tooth line. I put this one aside and filed a small rip saw that I'm giving to Miles.


small rip saw - jointing the the tops of the teeth
I am going to sharpen this small rip saw that I am going to put into Miles's toolbox. I jointed the tops of the teeth and this is about the middle of the saw. The tooth line wasn't even after 4-5 strokes down the saw with the jointer.

the toe
the heel
The heel looked the best tooth wise which I expected.


11 TPI
the toe after I sharpened them
time to test my work
This saw wouldn't saw 1/2" stock before I sharpened it and that is what this is.


not too bad
It is fairly straight and I had no problems sawing it. It was definitely a huge improvement over the sawing I tried before I sharpened it. The saw also has no set that I can feel. I'll be doing that for the first time tomorrow.

not bad for my second attempt at sharpening
missed a few
Only five teeth still have file jointing marks that I didn't file away when I sharpened. There was one area that had 4-5 misshaped and missing teeth that I think I made better and worse. Instead of 4-5 goofy teeth I now have 2.

sharpie marks the rework spots
From the heel going to the toe about 4 inches is the best looking real estate. I marked all the problem areas that need further help. Overall, I think I improved the tooth line compared to the original line of garbage I inherited. It will be a while before I master this and it will just take some time and a lot of practice.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is a nonce?
answer - something that is made or used only once


What’s new

NCW Woodworking Guild - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 7:39pm

Check out the new “Library” and “For Sale or Trade” tabs in the menu. Here’s why:

Over the summer, new guild member Barb Siddiqui donated a treasure trove of mostly hardback woodworking books to us. In other words, we have a library! Included in the 500+ titles are some of the best ever published: all of The Best of Fine Woodworking books, woodturning books, carving books, books on making period furniture, you name it.

The library is housed at Lombard’s Hardwoods, and all volumes are available for check-out by guild members. In the notebook provided, print your name and contact info, along with the names of the titles you are borrowing, then be sure to bring them back. If someone might want a page or two copied out a particular book, we recommend taking a picture of the pages with your phone or tablet.

The “For Sale or Trade” idea has been bandied around for awhile now, and since yours truly (Autumn) will have to make all of the postings and updates, I was skeptical about starting it, but we’ll give it a go and see where it goes. I’ll do my best to keep it updated.

If you have a woodworking related item to sell or trade, send me the info, with photos, to autumn.doucet@gmail.com. Be sure to provide your name (some email addresses are obscure) and your contact information. Please send me an email advising me when to take down the posting, otherwise, you’ll keep getting inquiries.

 Darrell Peart is coming to town! Date and other info are on the sidebar.

darrell peart

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Finishing Workshop @ CW – Making Sandpaper

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 4:50pm

In preparing for the sessions at The Anthony Hay Shop of CW I decided at the last minute to toss in the materials needed to make sandpaper, not knowing whitener or not there would be any interest.  It turned out that a lot of the participants were indeed interested, and several told me a very common question from the visiting public was some variation of, “Did they have sandpaper in the old days?”

So I’m glad I had what was needed.

We started with moderate weight rag paper, albeit machine made, not hand cast (maybe next time).

Wetting the paper both sides relaxed it so it would pucker less when the hot glue was applied to one side.

We were using 135 gws glue since it had plenty of adhesion properties plus was much more flexible than higher grades, making it more usable since it would not fracture when bent.

Once the glue has been on the paper long enough such that it is tacky but not wet, the surface is sprinkled with fine frit, the ground glass that was often used as the abrasive for some ancient sandpapers (hence the common terminology of “glass paper”).  You want the glue tacky enough to adhere the frit, but not wet enough to soak into it and turn it into a big chunk on the surface.

The glued sheet with frit is shaken or brushed so that the frit covers the whole surface, and the piece is set aside.  Once the glue has hardened adequately the excess frit is brushed or shaken off and the sheet is allowed to dry fully.

And voila’, you have a genuine new piece of antique sandpaper about 180 grit.

 

 

 

 

 

dynaGlide Plus available through Vogt Toolworks

Tico Vogt - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:54pm

Three years ago I learned about dynaGlide Plus from Richard Welder at Micro Fence. It is a Silicone and Teflon free dry boundary lubricant. I have used it principally to clean the swarf off the bearing surfaces of my shooting boards and to lubricate them. It functions well on metal planes, edge tools, bits, bearings, and abrasive surfaces.

 

Vogt Toolworks is now a distributor. Click here to view the Product Page.

 

 

 

Nick Offerman Woodworking Non-profit Matching Grant

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 9:05am

Woodworker, author, actor, humorist and all-around nice guy (with a most excellent giggle) Nick Offerman and Offerman Woodshop are teaming with Would Works through October 30 for a $20,000 fundraising campaign. Would Works is a Los Angeles non-profit that teaches people who are homeless or who live in the city’s Skid Row neighborhood create and sell handcrafted wood items as they work toward a specific financial goal – simple goals many […]

The post Nick Offerman Woodworking Non-profit Matching Grant appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

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