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He is risen, indeed!

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General Woodworking

plate roughed out.....

Accidental Woodworker - 1 hour 20 min ago
I stopped at Lowes after OT this morning to get sink clips and a 4x4 piece of 1/4" birch plywood for the bookcase. I went 0 for 2 on them. I asked two Lowes workers where the sink clips were and both said it wasn't their department and walked away.  This isn't the Lowes I usually go to and it is laid out differently from one I do frequent. So after wandering around hunting on my own and not finding anything, I left.

Before I left I made a circuit through the hardwood aisle. I had done some figuring and I could make my stand up desk for work out of 3 1x12x3' boards of NZ pine. I like this wood because it is hard and I can write on it without also making indents in the wood. 3 boards of this would have cost me over $60 so I looked at poplar. A 1x12x6' poplar board was going for close to $40. I'll drive to New Hampshire first and buy wood there before I pony up any dollars at Lowes. Not a good start to my day after leaving work.

The good news is I made an extra road trip to the Lowes I normally  go to. Asked a kid in the kitchen department where the sink clips where. Without hesitating, he told me exactly where they were (he couldn't have been more than 19-20 years old). I bought 3 bags because I either lost the one that came with the sink or none were in the box. I also got a 4x4 piece of 1/4" birch plywood but it was different. The front was birch, the middle had a couple of plies, but the back was covered with paper

photographic proof
Sometimes things that befuddle you just fall into place one day, unexpectedly.  It finally happened with me with Mr Spokeshave.  I have watched Paul Sellers use a spokeshave on end grain without any problems and make nice shavings. Me, I got nothing but tear out, chattering, gouges, leading me to using something else besides a spokeshave.

Today I bandsawed the radius on the two corners and cleaned them up with the spokeshave like I had been doing it all my life. I didn't get one continuous shaving from one side to the other but there was no tearing out or chattering. My shavings were smooth and easy coming though. This is the spokeshave iron that I sharpened correctly this time but making sure I raised a burr first.

missing tool
One good thing about tool racks, is you always know when a tool is MIA.

found it on the laundry table
most of the parts are rough sawn
Working on the corbel for the clock shelf.  I am going with a single one here vice two.

need a cutout for the apron

vertical cut is too wide
I am making this cut wider to allow for scribing the corbel to the wall.

this edge will be scribed to the wall
vertical cut was done on the bandsaw and the horizontal one by hand
back side of the horizontal saw cut
The front was done pretty much on the line and this I will flush up with a chisel.

good fitting joint
changed lanes on the scribing
I nixed scribing this to the wall. I planed the part underneath the apron until the cutout sat flush on it. There isn't any real need to go this nutso on this and make extra work for myself.

continued success with the spokeshave
I was able to clean up and smooth the entire curve on this corbel with the spokeshave. I think I'm finally over the learning curve hump with this.

roughing in the parts
The area below the plate rail will be wallpapered and above it is getting paint. The plate rails will butt into the clock shelf and I'll reinforce that joint with a biscuit. The bottom aprons butt together underneath the center of the clock shelf.

the corbel will hide the butt joint
The fit of this is pretty good dry. It lays up tight to the wall and it looks like I didn't need to scribe it afterall.

the kitchen clock
I made this clock in 1995 and it still has the original quartz movement. The shelf is 1 inch bigger than the clock in both directions.

big hollow on this side
I am not going to do anything with this. If I scribe this to fit the wall I would have to cut another plate rail wider to allow for that. The gap is almost a 1/4" wide and I can cheat on this a little by planing a little off the two opposite ends. I don't want to make and fit each individual corbel on this side.

I can do beads with this too
I made two sized beads with this plane to get beads and a larger rabbets too.

my beading irons
This is a record plane but the 3rd from the left is a Stanley iron I think. I tried the Stanley one (after I sharpened it) and the record 3/16" one.

the record bead
Had a bit of trouble plowing this. It was choppy and took a bit more oomph than I thought it should have. I got a bead and a large rabbet nonetheless.

the rabbet makers
The iron made a groove on either side of the hump. I removed most of the outside groove wall with the chisel and planed it flush with the bullnose plane.

the record 3/16" bead
the Stanley bead
I don't know the size of this as it is none marked on the iron. I'm guessing it is 1/4". I like this size better than the smaller 3/16".

the plane is history
This is a small piece of stock and it bowed in the dogs. The far end of the stick didn't get as large of a rabbet as the rest of it. The two pieces of stock that I want to bead are already sawn out and I can't use this plane on them. The fence on the plane rides on the bench keeping the iron from planing the wood. I don't have any way to hold the stock and plane the bead so this is toast.

3/16" beading plane
I like this but the bead is too small and there is no rabbet. I could saw a bit off the thickness but I really want a rabbet/shoulder on this molding.

1/4" side bead plane
I looked over the plane and I found the size on the heel. This is the one I'll use on the plate rail. I don't think I'll have any holding problems trying to plane this bead on the small pieces of stock I have.

still haven't done it
I can't seem to get over the fact that I have to use plastic hands on this clock. I'll have to suck it up  because my wife has asked me twice about it's status.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
How many stone blocks are in the Washington Monument?
answer - 36,491

There Are No Rules.

The Furniture Record - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 9:04pm

Let’s recap what we know about chairs. There are one-legged chairs:

PD_7520_MAIN

One leg is enough.

Two-legged chairs:

IMG_3029

Obidos, Portugal

IMG_5106

Go with me here.

Three-legged chairs:

IMG_5025

Obviously a Canadian chair.

IMG_3610

Swiss.

IMG_3792

Ancient in appearance.

And the conventional four-legged chairs:

IMG_3681

Primitive chairs.

masters-chair-black-pilippe-starck-for-kartell_1024x1024

Modern chairs.

DSC_3812

Abstract chairs.

Today, we were on the Eastern shore of Virginia tracking down the final resting place of my wife’s dead relatives. By 2:00 PM, we were out of places to look and relative to look for. As it happens, there was a large antiques mall just a few miles up the road. And it was raining. We went.

I wandered around a bit and thought I had found the elusive five-legged chair when I saw this one:

IMG_5443

It looks like it has a spare leg out front.

Upon closer examination, I realized it only has four legs but the are incorrectly placed:

IMG_5447

Mistakes were made, heads will roll.

These furniture makers have no respect for tradition. Furniture making is no place for original thinking. The furniture gods are surely angry.

One more look:

IMG_5445

There are no rules!

Of course, it would be hard to rock back. Maybe lean side to side…


This Isn’t Me Anymore

The Literary Workshop Blog - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 8:13pm

Like a lot of guys, I used to collect weapons.  Well, “collect” is probably too strong a word, but I’ve had various blades hanging on the wall for a long time.  But the time has come to take them down.  The sword will stay up–it’s a dress-sword anyway, not a real weapon–but the rest are coming down.  It’s not that I wouldn’t defend my family if necessary.  (I have four daughters; I am no pacifist.)  It’s that my innermost desires are no longer for adventure and conquest, but for stability and peace.

Bayonet Box 4-2017When I was a teenager, I started collecting bayonets and knives.  I had carried a pocketknife since I was 10, but I think I bought my first vintage bayonet when I was 14 or 15.  Over the next few years, I picked up a few more at antique shops when I could afford them.

Why?  Because I was a young man, and I thought knives and bayonets were cool.  I still admire the craftsmanship of some of them.  (The one pictured here was made in Switzerland and hefts like it.)  But most young men just enjoy playing with sharp, pointy objects.

When my wife and I bought our house years ago, I hung the bayonets up on the wall, but then I more or less forgot about them.

In the meantime, I needed to build things.  A LOT of things.  I had started buying tools and learning how to use them. I had made a bookshelves, a storage box or two, a side table, and more bookshelves.  Then came the beds for us and for the kids.  I rebuilt the back porch.  I built a dining table.  I built more bookshelves.  I made a lot of wooden spoons.

And every now and then I would glance at those bayonets hanging on the wall.  The more I did, the more I thought, “That’s not me anymore.”

Of course I had never used those bayonets.  I had taken one or two of the knives on camping trips, but otherwise, they had never been of any use to me.  At best, they were slightly odd home decor.  At worst, they were fuel for heroic, violent fantasies.  Unlike my tools, which I use on a weekly basis, I hadn’t touched the bayonets in years.  I was holding onto them for nostalgia’s sake, I suppose, but I wouldn’t have missed them if they had disappeared.

What had happened to me?  I grew up.

There is a strong fighting instinct in boys, and it persists into adolescence.  I will openly admit that fantasies of fighting and aggression were probably behind my impulse to collect and display weapons.  (Thank Heaven I’m a cheapskate, or I might have ended up with dozens of those things.)  I see this aggressive impulse in my young son, who loves dressing up in super-hero costumes and racing around the house, “fighting” with any opponent, real or imaginary, that he can find. (He’s learning not to attack his sisters.  Or the dog.) I was like that as a kid, too.  Most boys are.  They love hitting, kicking, stabbing, and shooting stuff.  It’s in the blood.

It’s wonderful to be a kid, and I sure did enjoy being a little boy.  I made a lot of wooden swords.  I enjoyed a lot of my adolescence, too, especially when I found I could buy real weapons.  I don’t regret collecting the weapons I did.  But once I started taking on responsibility–a job, a spouse, a home, and children–I found my desires changing.

I no longer wanted to fight, but to build.

In 1 Corinthians 13, the Apostle Paul remarks that when he became a man, he put away childish things.  Paul doesn’t mean he suddenly gained a Y-chromosome.  He means that he grew up.  Being a man is about responsibility motivated by love.  And for me, becoming a man entailed putting away away fantasies of violence replacing them with the slow, steady work of building a home, and taking responsibility for the everyday well-being of those who dwell in it.

So in the spirit of putting away childish things, I took the bayonets down off the wall and packed them away.  I found some pine boards and built a little crate to store them in.

Bayonet Box 4-2017

It’s not a fancy box–just nailed together in an old-fashioned manner.  The lid fits on snugly with only friction, thanks to the thin battens on its underside.

Bayonet Box 4-2017

I filled the crate with those old weapons and tied some cord around it. Perhaps one day I’ll know what I should do with them, but for now I’m storing the box somewhere safe and out of the way.

I want to be a man of peace.

I want to build things.

That’s who I am now.


Tagged: bayonet, boy, boyhood, build, building, childhood, crate, knife, love, man, manhood, manly, peace, weapon, weapons

Spring Ritual – Hydro System Tune-up

The Barn on White Run - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 10:51am

With the passing of winter (fingers crossed) and the hydroelectric system de-mothballed, I undertook my annual ritual of tuning up both ends of the penstock, or pipeline that carries the water from the small dam at the top to the turbine at the bottom.

My first big upgrade a few years ago was to swap out the original four large capacity Tractor-trailer deep cycle batteries for four ultra-mega high performance deep cycle batteries for storing the generated electricity.  Each of the new batteries has the capacity of the entire previous battery bank, so with this step I increased my power storage 16-fold.  BTW each of the new batteries weighs 192 pounds, and these are the largest capacity 12v batteries available in the US.

A couple years ago I swapped out the rock-and-concrete catching dam at the edge of the property for a rock-and-sandbag one three hundred feet closer.  I did this to save myself the intense maintenance involved in that last hundred yards of run which provided only another ten feet of drop.  It just was not worth the added effort, being more than 25% of the penstock maintenance for a return of about 8% in the power output.  Besides, the new site was perhaps the nicest narrowing of the creek with a huge rock on one bank and a great source of stacking rocks for the other.

Once again this year my debris filter needed replacing, something I will just have to plan in doing every other Spring unless I can find some stainless steel 1/4″ hardware cloth.

It only takes me four or five minutes to make a new one, and it swaps out with the older one in about fifteen seconds.  I spend way more time walking up to the site and anything else.

On the bottom end of the penstock I also refined some revisions I’d made in previous years.  The turbine came with three graduated fixed nozzles when I bought it, 1/4″, 5/16″, and 3/8″, to provide for a nearly infinite variability in the system flow control.  This required pipe fittings leading the three high-pressure hoses going to each of the nozzles, and the Y-pipe fittings were a maintenance headache.  Previously I’d cut the options down to two nozzles and their fittings, but I realized that the only one I really needed was the largest one and reconfigured the routing again.

Now it’s just a straight shot leading to a single hose and nozzle.

The output of the hydro system is running about 10-12 kwh per day, which is way more than I need for most any day.  Even running a planer for three hours or the wax cookers all day is no problem, especially on a sunny day when the solar panels kick in another 8-10 kwh.

My next system projects are to build a heavy-mass turbine housing to dampen the whine of the turbine, which interferes with the gurgling of the stream, and build a new powerhouse for all the electronics inherent in the system..

CNC Skills: Origin Points — Part Two: Finding and setting the Zero Point

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 6:00am

In the first post in this CNC Skills series on Origin Points, I emphasized how critical reference positions are for digital woodworkers. When you’re working on a drawing in CAD, the origin point is at the intersection of the X, Y and Z axis. All measurements — positive or negative, begin at that point. By the numbers, that’s X=0,Y=0,and Z=0. It’s from that position that the piece you’re cutting is […]

The post CNC Skills: Origin Points — Part Two: Finding and setting the Zero Point appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

working the plate rail.......

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 12:41am
Worked on the plate rail tonight but not because I forgot about the bookcase. I had been thinking about it today on when to drill for the shelf pin sleeves. Do it now and risk not getting the bookcase square or do it after the bookcase is glued? I can see plusses and minuses for both and I got time to pick one. Tonight was for working on finalizing the plate rail details.

got the corbels done
The first two from the left are slightly different. The first one has a flat where it meets the bottom molding and the second one doesn't. The one with the flat was done to fit the space between the top rail and the bottom molding.  Overall I'm satisfied with the sizes of the individual parts except for the bottom molding. That one is too thick and I think something a 1/2" thick would look better.

too thick and I don't like the profile
I planed a cove on this and it did nothing for me. I then put a small round over on the on the top of it to soften it and I still didn't like it.

this looks much better to me
This is a 1/2" thick piece of pine that I planed a bead on the edge. It's too wide but I do like how it looks for the bottom molding.

the scale of the new molding is a better fit here
I wish this rabbet was larger
Being larger would make the shadow line of this stand out. It wouldn't be obscured once it gets painted.

the plane I used to make the bead
I can take the two fences off of the plane and that would allow me to make a deeper bead but I am not sure if it would make the rabbet wider. I like the bead and that stays and I may have to just accept the size of the rabbet.

my smallest hollow
I think I got this nomenclature correct. A hollow makes a round profile and the round makes a circular hollow. I tried to round over the top of the bead to remove the square edge but the results sucked. The hollow may have worked if it was smaller but this one didn't make a round over but instead made a chamfer. I ended up doing it with a block plane.

I tried
I used a bullnose plane to try to increase the rabbet and all I did was to chew it up. It is not easy trying to start the plane on such a small rabbet.

did kind of ok on the far end
test run for the plate groove
My smallest hollow is a #5 which I think is too big but I'm going to try it anyways. I nailed the wood strip to guide the hollow so I'll have a straight groove.

big number 5
nail holes won't be a problem
The plate rail is going to be painted so once the holes are filled, they won't be seen once the paint goes on.


groove is way too big
from Bob Demers
I will need a #1 hollow to make my plate groove. I've read that the small H&R mouths are prone to chipping and breaking out. I forgot I had this attached to one of the 6 cabinet tool doors.

haven't used any of these for quite a long time
1/4" veining router bit
I bought this many, many lunar eclipses ago to do plate rail grooves.  I don't think that I used it more than 3 or 4 times. I may have to use it for the 5th time to do these plate rails.

I quit here because I had to go to the bank. I forgot my PIN for my ATM and I got locked out after 3 invalid tries so I need the bank to reset it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
The Panama Canal has 12 locks. The Suez Canal is twice as long and it has how many locks?
answer - none

Book Giveaway: With Saw, Plane & Chisel

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 9:00am
With Saw, Plane & Chisel

I was looking through some of our recent books for this week’s book giveaway and realized I had an extra copy of Zach Dillinger’s “With Saw, Plane & Chisel” on my desk. It’s a fascinating look at period-accurate building techniques. If you love classic American furniture and are interested in how things were made back in the day, this book is worth a read. Zach creates museum quality reproductions the old fashioned […]

The post Book Giveaway: With Saw, Plane & Chisel appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Goin’ Hollywood

The Barn on White Run - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 7:55am

Last month I was visited by Joshua Farnsworth, Ray Pine, and George Lott, for a wonderful day of fellowship, filming, and yakking about woodworking and rural living.

Joshua shot a bunch of video to be edited and compiled and the first one was posted last night.  You can find it here.  Clearly I have a face for radio and a voice for writing.

Don Williams’ Amazing Off-Grid Timber Frame Barn Workshop (Part 1)

Wood and Shop - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 6:40am
  In this video & article, Don Williams shares a tour of his timber frame barn woodworking workshop in the mountains of Highland County, Virginia. And yes, he bought his 4 story timber frame barn on eBay...I'll explain in more detail below. I first met Don Williams several years

Hewing Wooden Bowls

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 5:34am

I’m getting ready to go over to Southbridge, Massachusetts for Fine Woodworking Live http://www.finewoodworkinglive.com/  but in the meantime, Lie-Nielsen just posted a preview of my new video on hewing wooden bowls. I copied it here, in case anyone would like to see what this video covers. I still have some available:  https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/new-dvds-carved-oak-boxes-hewing-wooden-bowls-spring-2017/  and they have the rest https://www.lie-nielsen.com/nodes/4243/home-education-videos

 

 


A Visit to a Furniture Restoration Shop in Tel Aviv: Part 2

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 5:00am

As I mentioned in the first part of the story, Shay likes to frequent the Jaffa flea markets to look for all kinds of goodies. In fact, many of the tools that he uses come from boxes of miscellaneous items that he has seen there. He buys the tools for little money and later finds the time to rehabilitate them. After fishing the tool from a merchant’s box or picking it from […]

The post A Visit to a Furniture Restoration Shop in Tel Aviv: Part 2 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

prototyping two.......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 12:18am
I prototyped two projects tonight and I didn't finish either of them. I got an idea I have to try for one and the other is making the parts into the whole. One prototype is for drilling shelf pin sleeves and that is the one I need to try an idea out on. The other one is my wife's honey-do plate rail and I have to make the parts fit together. It wasn't a wasted night and I'm think I'm headed in the right direction on both of them.

using an off cut
I changed the offset at the front and back. Using 2" put them too close together so I moved the rear to 1 1/2" in from the rabbet and the front is 1 3/4" in from the edge. This spread them out more and I think it will make the shelf more stable and give better support for them.

the first row is easy to do
the throat isn't deep enough for the second row
In order to do the opposite row I would have to flip the board 180 and I lose the registration I had on the first row. I was hoping that I could have drilled one row, put spacer between the fence and the shelf, and drilled the opposite side. This is where plan B was formulated.

the problem
Since I don't see any other way around this I am going to have to drill the two starter holes. Getting these two holes dead nuts on the same square line is imperative.

if I drill one hole off in either direction
all the resultant holes will be off too
That means the two holes, side to side, won't be square and shelf will rock. I think everyone knows how I feel about rocking.

the idea
Make a jig with the two outside bottom holes drilled. Place it on the shelf bottom and drill those two holes. Getting the these two holes square on the jig won't be problem. Getting the jig and those two holes square on the shelf sides will have to be done carefully. Because there is a right and left side and I have to account for that.

my spacer
The dowel will be the same size as the drill bit. The first hole will be drilled by placing the dowel in one of the two starter holes. But before I do that I have to set the distance between the spacer dowel and the drill bit. I will do that by placing a piece of wood 2" wide between the drill bit and the spacer dowel. I'll clamp the spacer fence to the drill press table and then drill a lot of holes.



what I should get
The dowel will be in the starter hole and the first drill press made hole should be 2" from that. All the other holes will be 2" from each other too.

doing the opposite side
I will use the same 2" wide piece of wood to set the dowel and drill bit distance and clamp the fence. Drill the opposite side holes and they should be square to the first set. I don't see any potential hiccups with this other than a bit of repetition. The drill press will give me a consistent depth and a hole square to the face of the side.

switched to the plate rail
I'm using the old kitchen cabinet doors to make the prototype for the plate rail. I lost the drawing my wife made but I got the major parts all here. I didn't do the mitered returns on the end and I'll do that after get the corbels figured out. I made them too large and I'll have to make it smaller. I'm doing one first and I'll use that as the pattern for the others.

a circle isn't going to work
If I try to make a quarter circle, it will match up with the edge of the plate rail but be off on the apron. I will have to draw something freehand here.

used a french curve to draw the arc
The fit is much better here but I will be doing these again.

the wife wants this edge to be rounded over
the clock shelf
I think the clock shelf will need a couple of large corbels or maybe just one in the middle. I rounded the two outside corners on it to be more in tune with the other round parts of plate rail.

top view
I will do the plate rail groove with a hollow and one of the smaller ones I have will work good here. The groove for the plates doesn't have to be much bigger than a 1/4".

I can make this in 5 pieces. A  R and L plate rail with the clock shelf in the middle. A two piece apron that I can butt together by placing it centered under the clock shelf. A corbel placed over it will hide that joint. This is starting to look to be doable.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is a portmanteau?
answer - a large suitcase usually made of leather and opening into two equal parts

Yup, That’s My Mom…

The Furniture Record - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 10:20pm

I was looking through the family picture album and came across this one:

IMG_5432

My Mother at a café near Florence in 1958.

We were there on vacation. We passed this café and stopped to look at the furniture. We could tell the chairs were Thonet. Turning them over we saw they were branded  Thonet and Made In Poland.

We couldn’t tell about the table. My Mother did the only reasonable thing and checked the table for markings. I could easily walk under the table but I couldn’t read so my use was limited.

Ever the lady, she even managed to keep her legs crossed at the ankles.

And, yes, she was wearing pearls.

(With apologies to Gianni Berengo Gardin and others)


The Missing Link

The Furniture Record - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:49am

As you all must realize, all our blogs go through extensive editing and quality contoll checks. The link for the flickr photo set accompanying today’s earlier blog, Primitives From Hickory Mountain,  was disabled shortly after posting. I believe we were hacked. I am going through the forensic evidence and now believe it was either the Russian FSB, the Iranian Ministry of Intelligence, the North Korean Bureau 121 or, most likely, the dreaded Landespolizei, the Liechtenstein National Police Force. We have had issues going back many years.

There is a small chance I deleted it when I went back in to edit the link to make the link open in a new window, but I doubt it. Beginner’s mistake.

If you were unable to see the photo set (as opposed to not wanting to see the photo set), you can go back and reread the blog (it’s that good) or click on the link HERE.

 


Woodturning Project: Turning Offset Candelabras

Highland Woodworking - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:00am

In the April issue of The Highland Woodturner, we are featuring Ray Bissonette, a favorite contributor from past issues.

After having his turnings featured in the June 2013 issue of The Highland Woodturner, Ray Bissonette used his earned store credit toward a new Spindle Gouge, which helped him add a new design element to his already “eccentric” woodturned candelabras.

CLICK HERE to see how he made them

The post Woodturning Project: Turning Offset Candelabras appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Video: How to Reduce Planer Snipe

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:44am

Nearly every time that I approach the planer, I think to myself, how am I going to get rid of snipe this time? Without fail, I end up with snipe at the leading or trailing edge at some point in the process to a varying degree. It has been rumored that some have totally mitigated the issue – but it is relieving to hear Doug Dale at Marc Adam’s School of Woodworking share […]

The post Video: How to Reduce Planer Snipe appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

@Handworks 2017 – Roubo Print 248

The Barn on White Run - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:01am

Finally we are getting to some of my prints wherein Roubo actually illustrates furniture rather than arcane geometric exercises (I can only speculate from the abundance of the latter in L’art du Menuisier that Roubo had not yet discovered girls).  Here is Print #248, “Illustrations of a Turkish-style Bed and its Developments.”

The artistry, rather than the mere technical mastery, of Roubo as both a draftsman and engraver are on display here as he shows the composition and design aesthetics required for creating “D’un Lit a la Turque.”  Frankly I am uncertain of what makes this a Turkish Bed, as opposed to the Polish Bed, the English Bed, the Martian Bed, etc., he presents in adjacent sections of the book.  Regardless, it is a lovely illustration and the page is in excellent condition, in fact I would say that there may be several in my inventory in as good a condition, but none better.

If you have ever wanted to own a genuine piece of Rouboiana, this is your chance.   I will be selling this print at Handworks on a first-come basis, with terms being cash, check, or Paypal if you have a smart phone and can do that at the time of the transaction.

$200

Asa Christiana & Woodworking From the Start – 360w360 E.228

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 4:10am
Asa Christiana & Woodworking From the Start – 360w360 E.228

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking Asa Christiana talks about his upcoming book, and his class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking, both of which focus on woodworking from the start.

Join 360 Woodworking every Thursday for a lively discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more). Glen talks with various guests about all things woodworking and some things that are slightly off topic. But the conversation is always information packed and lots of fun.

Continue reading Asa Christiana & Woodworking From the Start – 360w360 E.228 at 360 WoodWorking.

Transformative By Nature

Inside the Oldwolf Workshop - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 2:36am

My wife occasionally reminds me that my relationship with tools is outside the bell curve of normal. The following thoughts may be proof of this.

With some tools there is a learning curve. You have to figure them out before you get consistent results. I think of my Veritas plow plane this way. It wasn't immediately intuitive to a dummy like me and I had to learn her idiosyncrasies (and get an upgraded depth stop from the company) before I was happy. This isn't a deal breaker in my world, I'm happy to get to know a tool well if we're going to have a long term relationship. Many of my planes and I have had this courtship.

Occasionally tools spring into your hand ready to go. Often it's because I payed my dues with a similar tool before finding this one. I taught myself good sawing technique on a self sharpened old Disston backsaw with a slightly warped plate. So when my first Bad Axe Saw found it's way home it was amazing.


But there are a small percentage of tools that signify a paradigm shift in my shop techniques. They change the way I solve problems and even view my work in the shop. Around a year ago this Morakniv 120 arrived in the mail. I bought it to add to my spoon carving kit, but it didn't live in that tool roll for long. It doesn't even go in my tool chest, it hangs on one of the pegs over my workbench and other than my holdfasts and bench mallet, is the most quickly accessible tool in my shop.


Last fall as I was building a set of kerfing planes and it became time to shape the handle, I decided to rough out the grip with the knife before reaching for the rasps, but once I worked down to a point I came to really like the lightly faceted feel on the knife carved handle. It transfered that "touch" to the tool's feel that's so elusive. So I slowed a bit and made better, finer, smoothing cuts to finish by knofe only. Treating the handles as I might the handle of a spoon.

This knife simply answers the call of duty every time without complaint. It came to me very sharp and it holds it's edge for a long time and is still easy to maintain with a charged leather strop. The wooden handle is modifiable but honestly I found it comfortable and responsive out of the box. The only thing I don't like, that keeps me from strapping it to my belt, is the plastic sheath. I suppose I should just find someone to make one for me out of leather. All in due time I suppose.

So there you go. Even the simplest of tools can be transformative to your shop time when they are designed and crafted just right.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf


P.S. 
This love letter is unsolicited and unsupported. I was not asked by MoraKniv to write this nor have I recieved anything from them. I was using this knife in my shop this week and this post formulated in the joy of the shavings coming off the blade. 
Cheers. 
D
Categories: General Woodworking

a honey do.....

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 1:10am
The title says it all. After staring at mt screen for minutes, and giving it my best goofy looks, I still had no title. (this title came the next morning when I was proofing this post)My wife has told me my blog titles are as catchy as 2 week old news. I think they reflect what the blog post is about. They may or may not draw someone in to read the keyboard diarrhea I put out. I have several blogs I read daily, on whenever the author posts, and the title doesn't bring in or turn me away. I'll read whatever is written.


Tonight is wednesday and I did a repeat of my garbage day post from last wednesday. I managed to cut up a few more pieces of the old counter top and get it in the shitcan. I couldn't get much because there was a lot of garbage already in there. I should be able to get most it in there for next week if I do it this weekend.

honey do project
My wife wants a plate rail to match the spice rack and the paper towel. This is want I have to go on. Dimensions are up to me until she gets to see them which I'm betting will be all wrong. I still don't know how long shes wants nor the height. The middle is supposed to get a bump up for the kitchen clock. From the drawing I think this means she wants a thin width plate rail. My plan is to make a small section of it out of plywood and get the ok before I make the whole thing.

the drawer and pencil tray have gone south
I decided to not put anything underneath the bookshelf.

my bookshelf
I thought about it last night and I kept looking at my bookshelf and thinking how I wish I had more room underneath it.  I keep a lot of crap there and I really would like to put the desk calendar under it. Being an ex-sailor, I look at this as prime undeveloped real estate. I hope my daughter sees it the same way.

shelf hardware
Two different sizes for different types of wood.

left is for hardwoods and the right for softwoods
I have never liked to use these pins without a sleeve and especially so in soft woods like pine. The sleeves go a long way in keeping the pins from deforming the holes. I am going to use the hardwood pins in the plywood bookcase.

two drill bits
One bit is for the pins and the other is for the sleeve. The sleeve bit is larger than the pin bit.

13" up from the bottom
I like to put the tall books at the bottom. The bottom shelf will have a finished height of 12 1/4" to the first pin.

top shelf

My wife has a lot of books that are 7" to 6" high. This shouldn't waste too much space at the top. I went with a 2" for the pins to save on them. This spacing will take 64 sleeves and 12 pins for 3 shelves.

I have been thinking about making a shelf pin drilling jig for the drill press. I think I got the spacer part figured out so it'll be repeatable but the distance from the edges is going to take some overtime with the brain power. I want to come in 2" from the front and the rear so I have a lot of holes to line up when I flip the sides to the opposite holes.

the box is done
I found a clean rag and buffed this out. It felt a little greasy before I did that and afterwards it felt smooth to the touch all over and not greasy.

left rear quarter glamour shot
the back
I like how the walnut plugs pop out. I wonder if Manny will look at this and think it is part of the box or what their true purpose is.

right side
interior shot
I picked a piece of birch plywood that had some figure and a knot in it.

back of the lid
I thinned the lid down but it still ended up about a 16th proud. I planed a small chamfer to ease the end of the lid into the back. This was it for my shop time tonight I had to go and deliver the box to Manny.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What four states voted against the 16th amendment (the income tax amendment)?
answer - Connecticut, Rhode Island, Utah, and Florida

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