Jump to Navigation

Hand Tool Headlines

The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

This "aggregator" collects all of the woodworking blogs I read every day - or try to anyway!  Enjoy!

Do you have a suggestion for a hand-tool woodworking blog you would like to see here?  Tell me via the CONTACT page.  Thanks!

Be sure to visit the Hand Tool Headlines section - scores of my favorite woodworking blogs in one place.  Also, take note of Norse Woodsmith's latest feature, an Online Store, which contains only products I personally recommend.  It is secure and safe, and is powered by Amazon.

General Woodworking

Don’t Miss Our Exciting New Direction – Subscribe Now!

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - 1 hour 19 min ago

I’m soooooo excited to announce that with the next issue, you’ll see a change in editorial direction! We’re going to brighten things up with lots of happy colors – and show you how to choose wood to match your aura for when a natural look is your goal!! You’ll find new ideas for yard-art!!! Get bunches of birdhouses ideas sure to attract the most discerning of avian friends!!!! Read important […]

The post Don’t Miss Our Exciting New Direction – Subscribe Now! appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

“Curious” as Spock Woiuld Say.

The Furniture Record - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 9:32pm

Interesting that the week in which I had no new posts, the number of followers went up. Views and visitors were down but one would expect that.

When I issue a new blog post, the number of views and visitors goes up. This makes sense. Occasionally, the follower count goes down. I try not to think about it.

I am not all that concerned about numbers, however. With the new grant, I am good for at least another three years. By then I should really be out of things to write about. Some argue that happened two years ago but I choose to ignore them.

The blog was down for a few days while we were on shoring production. As most of you know, since the beginning of the blog it has been written and edited by the staff in Bangalore. I  found that most Indian editors had a better understanding of grammar and spelling that I ever hope to have. With the new grant, I had the money to bring all this back to the US. OK, most of the work is done in the break room at the Hyundai factory in Marshall, Alabama. Hey, I’m trying.

Now that the staff has been selected and trained, blogs should be coming more regularly. Whether of not that is a good thing is not for me to say.

As a follow-up to yesterday’s blog, It’s Just Wrong…, I would like to thank all of you who have commented. There were many interesting origin myths and stories. What I was looking for, though, was an explanation of why it’s wrong. I want people who shop at Restoration Elm Barn to understand why this table is an un-good thing. Why some of us are amused and/or annoyed.

The table, in case you have forgotten:

Bad, bad table.

Bad, bad table. Am I the only person that thinks anchor when viewed?

I approved all comments but one. A reader called “Jeremy” seems to have submitted a no-comment comment. There was nothing there that I could find. Nothing to approve. He either forgot to include the comment or is a genius and is making the statement that there is no suitable comment to be made. Or, that needs to be made. Or, res ipsa loquitur, the thing speaks for itself.

My readers are just that brilliant.


See It In Person

Inside the Oldwolf Workshop - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 8:47pm

A while back. during a family vacation, I visited the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In one of the first galleries I found an original Greene and Greene dining set designed for the Charles Millard Pratt House. Darlings of the Arts and Crafts style, G&G furniture always grabs my attention. I own several books about them and have read many, many magazine articles written about original pieces, reproductions, and “inspired by” work. I have never had the opportunity to see any original in the flesh.

I hovered and studied the table and six chairs for more than a half hour. Moving around the peninsula dias to see all the angles and even setting off the proximity sensor alarms.

Twice.

I’m not really interested in building a reproduction or “inspired by” piece, maybe I was once, but those days have passed. so that wasn't the intent of my scrutiny. I was trying to decipher the mystery of my attraction to the Greene brother’s designs and I found it in the subtle details I could never quite pick up on in photographs.


Whether it’s a Greene and Greene dining set or a Philadelphia Highboy, many woodworkers experience these pieces only through measured drawings, cut lists, or a Sketchup models. Isn’t it odd that in a three dimensional medium like furniture making, the majority of our knowledge is transferred in two measly dimensions? Catalogues that come full of pictures of fantastic furniture, isolated against sterile drop cloth backgrounds only tell, at best, half the story. These photos hold no regard for how a piece lives in space, how it can command or deflect attention in a room, or truly convey the subtle details and textures that act like punctuation in a well written sentence.


Museums are the flagships of the art world because they allow people to experience a masterpiece in person. As an art student years ago, I was encouraged to imitate the styles of the masters to learn from them and better imitation sprang from time put in studying a master’s work. It was a given that seeing a masterwork in person was a superior experience. Photos in books will never really show the texture and color found in a Van Gogh painting. The way a Rembrandt changes subtly depending on the angle you view from. Or the way a Picasso draws a visceral feeling from you as your mind takes in everything both familiar and alien.

Translating that experience into broadening your woodworking horizons is easy. All it requires is that you step out of the shop for a while and look for opportunities. Visit an antique dealer and open some drawers to look at the hand cut dovetails. Find a museum or historical home in your area and see what they have to offer, you may be surprised at the cross contamination of ideas that comes from looking at great works other than furniture. Better yet, volunteer and get the chance to spend extra quality time around those pieces. Make a pilgrimage to see great works: The Gamble House in Pasadena, Winterthur Museum in Delaware, The Museum of Southern Decorative Arts in North Carolina.

Get out and see the work that inspires you in person. I promise it will only inspire you more.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf
Categories: General Woodworking

A Spectacular Desk With A Little Problem

The Barn on White Run - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 6:05pm

cIMG_8586

Recently I had the chance to work on a fairly snazzy roll-top writing desk, which needed a bit of conservation. It was built around 1770 by arguably the greatest furniture makers who ever lived, and is prominent in the collection of the elegant museum dedicated to European fine and decorative arts.

cIMG_8587

A short section of cross-grain molding had become detached, and part of my charge was to examine the desk from top to bottom to assess its overall condition.   I did, and it is in fine shape.

cIMG_8592

As was clear from the back of the moldings and the ground under them, this was not the first time these pieces had separated from the mother ship.  I counted three distinct campaigns of glue, and there could have been many more.

cIMG_8593

The pieces fit their place nearly perfectly even dry, with only the tiniest bit of rocking due to the excess glue under them.

cIMG_8595

My strategy was to soften the extant glue and remove only a bit of it, so I poulticed the glue line on the desk with some blue paper towel, cut to fit the space precisely and moistened with water.

cIMG_8596

I did the same to the backs of the detached pieces.

cIMG_8600

After a quarter hour or so the glue had softened and swelled to the point I wanted, and I removed the worst of the clumps and left the remainder in place.  For adhesive I turned to my long time fave, Milligan and Higgins 192 Special grade hot animal hide glue.  I had prepared this the days before the treatment, soaking it first in water overnight, then cooking it twice the day before I went.  A little dab of that, a minute of holding them in place with my infertips to gel, and I was done.

I packed up and left, reflecting on the fact that the opportunity to care for furniture from the greatest menuisiers of all time is exactly the reason I started down this path 43 years ago.

 

On the bank’s green edge…

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 1:42pm

Saw a book at the library the other day – Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do – but I didn’t take it home. I already know I like living within sight of  the water.

Looking down the Jones River

 

As an added bonus, the borrowed shop I’m using has a water view as well. As you might know, I had a great time this winter. But…I’m not sad to see it going away now…today was the first day I could sit outside and feel warm enough in just a sweater. So I sat by the edge of Town Brook and ate my lunch. And watched the water.

Up the Town Brook

 

For ten minutes, I was transported. I was Huck Finn, drifting down his Mississippi. Then I was Henry David Thoreau, philosophizing beside Walden Pond. I heard Garcia singing Brokedown Palace.  I was that red-tail hawk, floating above the Brook…then I was me, thinking of the Jones River at home…was the tide low or high?

that way to the sea

 

Then an emergency vehicle came screaming down the road, my reverie was snapped. Water view or not, it was time to go back to work. But it sure was a great ten minutes.

sawing


Turning a corner.

Tico Vogt - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 10:24am

The snow pack is largely melted by the house and no precipitation of any kind is falling at the moment. Rays of sun poke through from time to time and the squawk of Red Wing Blackbirds carries on the wind.

It begins to feel, finally, a little bit like spring when the sawhorses can go outside.

R S Outdoor board breakdown

Handworks 2015 Banner

In Memory of John Donne, (?? 1572-March 31, 1631)

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 7:08am

No, this is not an April Fools’ joke posted a day early. It’s a poem from one of my favorite writers, John Donne, who died on this date in 1631. Why this poem (or any poem)? The central conceit is the compass – a powerful tool in woodworking. After the poem (yes, yes; I know many will skip it), I’ve posted links to just some of the compass techniques and […]

The post In Memory of John Donne, (?? 1572-March 31, 1631) appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Tips from Sticks in the Mud – April Tip #3- Using the small pieces of PVC

Highland Woodworking - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 7:00am

No Southern-fried Southern boy wants to be called a Yankee, but we share the characteristics of shrewdness and thrift.  Thus, each month we include a money-saving tip.  It’s OK if you call me “cheap.” 

Useful are even the smallest pieces of PVC pipe you begged from the plumbers at the construction site up the street.  If you, like me, live where humidity is generated for distribution to the rest of the country, you try to do everything you can to keep the wetness out of your shop.

For example, I keep the doors and windows closed, except when the hygrometer tells me the humidity outside is near to or lower than the indoor humidity.

A high-capacity dehumidifier (lower left) combined with a ceiling fan (upper right) for circulation, centrally-placed among cast-iron power tools minimizes rust risk.  As an added bonus, the brisk flow of dry air from the dehumidifier can air-dry wood in no time.  The collection being dried in this photo consists of boscoyos, Cajun French for “cypress knees.”

A high-capacity dehumidifier (lower left) combined with a ceiling fan (upper right) for circulation, centrally-placed among cast-iron power tools minimizes rust risk. As an added bonus, the brisk flow of dry air from the dehumidifier can air-dry wood in no time. The collection being dried in this photo consists of boscoyos, Cajun French for “cypress knees.”

When the north wind brings in dry air, take advantage of the opportunity to air out the shop.  Today is such a day.

When the north wind brings in dry air, take advantage of the opportunity to air out the shop. Today is such a day.

Sometimes you need to run a power cord or air hose outside, necessitating an incompletely-closed door or window.  Instead, you can drill a hole through the wall exactly the outside diameter of a piece of PVC pipe which has an inside diameter capable of allowing passage of your cord or hose.

When drilling your hole, make a test hole in scrap first to ensure the bit you choose will deliver a tight fit.  Asking your wife before drilling through the wall is optional.  Sometimes it’s easier to get forgiveness than permission.

When drilling your hole, make a test hole in scrap first to ensure the bit you choose will deliver a tight fit. Asking your wife before drilling through the wall is optional. Sometimes it’s easier to get forgiveness than permission.

Because I do a lot of sanding outdoors, and I like to have compressed air to blow away sanding dust from my project, I use this little passageway for the air hose, allowing the door to stay closed.

Although this wall is mostly protected from rain, I angled the hole down toward the outside so that any rainwater that comes this way can’t go indoors.

Although this wall is mostly protected from rain, I angled the hole down toward the outside so that any rainwater that comes this way can’t go indoors.

A 50-cent PVC cap keeps out Mr. No-Shoulders, as well as any other unwelcome visitors.

A 50-cent PVC cap keeps out Mr. No-Shoulders, as well as any other unwelcome visitors.

Mr. No-Shoulders, for those who have not yet made his acquaintance, or don’t know him by this name.

Mr. No-Shoulders, for those who have not yet made his acquaintance, or don’t know him by this name.

 

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home. Questions and comments on woodworking may be sent to DrRandolph@MyPetsDoctor.com. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Tips from Sticks in the Mud – April Tip #3- Using the small pieces of PVC appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

one almost done......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 1:14am
When I pulled into the driveway tonight, my wife was already home. That isn't a good sign as I always get home first. She left work early because she wasn't feeling too well. I just hope that she doesn't infect me with whatever she has. I had to make a pit stop at CVS to get her some Tylenol before I could hit the shop and unwind.

cross brace set up
This square has my attention and I am not a fan of wooden tools of this type. I prefer metal for my squares but I do like the light weight of this. And in spite of the lightness, it is surprisingly stiff and rigid. I sawed off the wings from the brace almost flush with the arms.

oak square
This oak one is pretty stiff as is too. It is square from the half lapped corner out to the tips. On the long arm there is slight hollow. The short arm is almost dead nuts. After seeing this I'm kind of straddling the fence about using this for a square.

flushing the joints
This side of the square has a few joinery hiccups where the brace crosses the long arm. I got a few blowouts when I chiseled this out.

out of square on the long arm
short arm is almost perfect
made a pattern of the arm end
I need to transfer this to the end of the long arm so I made a pattern. I am going to use this for the oak one also. I may want to make a few more of these for xmas presents to give away. I hope I remember where I put this pattern.

I band sawed most of it and rasped it to the lines
what do you think
I have 6 doors and 6 wooden squares. Without planning for it, the pine one (oak one too) fits within the raised portion of the panel. The other 4 squares are wooden try squares and I'm sure they will fit within the raised portion too. I just have to find where I hid them.

I still have to do something on the cross brace. On that I think I will just do a doodle on the outboard edge only. I don't like the straight square look to it. I'll have to think of some kind of detail to put here that doesn't take away too much meat.

lost part of the bottom edge
 The profile will remove 99% of the splintered edge. What little it doesn't remove I can feather it out.

This is it for tonight. I have to go make the wife some soup and a grilled cheese sandwich. It is her favorite 'I'm sick' meal.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
The Romans had 3 words for kissing - basium, osculum,  and suavium. What are distinctions between them?
answer - basium is a kiss between acquaintances, osculum a kiss between close friends, and suavium is a kiss between lovers

It’s Just Wrong…

The Furniture Record - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 6:44pm

I saw this while out wandering today:

It's just wrong.

It’s just wrong.

We all know it’s wrong. It is beyond kitsch. Or parody. Closer to burlesque.

I am offering a $10 (US) Veritas/Lee Valley gift card to the person who most succinctly explains why it is wrong. “Because” and “It just is”, while accurate, will not be accepted.


More on Bath Vanity

I'm a OK guy - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 6:00pm
The bottom (shelf) stretchers have been fitted. I've clamped the vanity together so I can mark the shelf slats. Once that is done I'll chop and saw the slats' M/T's, put the vanity back together in sections to mark and drill the draw bores, make a couple of drawer boxes, and a top. I could be finished in a couple or three days If I could find 'em to rub together.


The Postal Lady delivered a care package from Bad Axe this afternoon. It had a couple of new saws, a 16" Tenon and a 14" Sash saw. Damn Bad Axe saws are pretty, addicting to.



Stickley No. 369 Slant-arm Morris Chair Plans

Bob Lang's ReadWatchDo - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 5:01pm
This chair is not included in my book “Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture” and now I am pleased to make large format plans of my favorite chair available. This is the chair I built for the cover of the April … Continue reading
Categories: General Woodworking

Spring cleaning, and an apology.

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 3:47pm

Yesterday we finally had a bit of decent weather; not that it was warm, it snowed the night before, but at the least it wasn’t freezing. I took the nicer weather as a sign that spring is finally springing, so I decided to not only clean out my garage, but the yard as well. It was an all day job, starting at 9 am and not ending until nearly 5 pm. But I managed to get a lot done, most importantly I managed to make my workbench area a lot less uncluttered. Much scrap wood, old cans, broken items, and stuff I generally had forgotten existed was either thrown away or donated to goodwill. I’m not finished yet, but I came a long, long way, and my garage should be much more suitable to woodworking when I begin my next project.

As far as woodworking is concerned, my cleanup and reorganization accomplished two things that I had been wanting to finish for more than a year: I was able to move my stain cabinet to the workbench area, and I was able to get my woodworking hardware (nails, screws, handles, knobs, brackets, etc.) organized and into one location that is easily accessible right from my workbench. I even managed to squeeze in a little woodworking during my clean-up. Firstly, I finished the small screw driver rack that I started, and secondly, I got the material for my next hand plane cut roughly to size..

Stain cabinet in place. Right side of the workbench de-cluttered and organized.

Stain cabinet in place. Right side of the workbench de-cluttered and organized.

An apology…

I started making a screw-driver rack a few weeks back from some scrap Walnut I had laying around. It was a good excuse to mess around with my hand-tools, and when my new ECE rabbet plane arrived it was a good excuse to put it to use. Before I go on let me say that my little screw driver rack is barely worth noting but for two reasons. The first reason is that I used my drill press to drill out the holes. Yes, I have a drill press. The tool was given to me twelve years ago and I barely use it. I have nothing against using a drill press, but this one is just not accurate enough to use in making furniture. It’s okay for drilling out a line of holes, or some light sanding, but the table is too wobbly and the depth stop not reliable enough for intricate work. The other reason is my smoothing plane.

Walnut board cleaned up.

Walnut board cleaned up.

First in War, First in Peace, and First in laying out a corner radius.

First in War, First in Peace, and First in laying out a corner radius.

Holes drilled out.

Holes drilled out.

My drill press

My drill press

A coat or two of linseed oil.

A coat or two of linseed oil.

I have one of the new Stanley Sweetheart #4 smooth planes. I picked it up on Amazon roughly three years ago for the ridiculously low price of $91. It is a good tool that is well made and attractive. My only problem with it is the same problem I have with other smooth planes, and that is the fact that I think smooth planes are overrated. I’ve written about this topic before so I won’t get into it again at the moment. At the same time, just because I felt that way it didn’t necessarily mean that I dislike the tool. Whenever I sharpen, I always give the #4 iron a few passes over the stone just to keep it razor sharp, and I usually take it apart once a month or so, as I do with my other bench planes, just to oil and clean it. Yesterday I used the #4 to clean up the screw driver rack boards both before and after assembly, and I also used it to prep the maple and bubinga I am using to make my next handplane. It was the first time since I’ve owned the tool that I used it for more than a few minutes and I have to admit that it was a joy to use. I was able to take fine and full-width shavings with little effort. Of course the sharp iron helped big time. Nevertheless, it was a joy to use a well-made tool exactly the way it was meant to be used. While I still don’t worship at the altar of the smooth plane, I’m at least at the door of the church. So I have to be forthright and admit that my bashing of the #4 was off-base, and I apologize to those who may have disagreed with my original assessment.

Fine maple and bubinga shavings

Fine maple and bubinga shavings

This could be a hand plane in a few weeks.

This could be a hand plane in a few weeks.


Categories: General Woodworking

It’s a tool sale!

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 8:34am

billlattpa:

If you’re interested in picking up some good woodworking tools…

Originally posted on The Butler Did It WoodWorks:

So I don’t post here as often as I would like, but I spend a lot of time over on Instagram (@tmb1752 if you’re interested). If you follow me there, you know I’ve kinda been changing my lifestyle in minor increments. i.e. eating healthier, exercising regularly, yoga, etc. Well one of the other things I have been working on is the ability to let go. A majority of that is letting go of stuff, both material stuff and otherwise. If I’ve never mentioned it before, I have a minor obsession with collecting tools. Nothing wrong with it, but I’ve finally decided that with a lifestyle change, this was one area I needed to work on as it is the most painful to think about. Since I am a rip off the band-aid guy, here we go.

I am listing approximately 25 items over the next few days. I like Chris…

View original 482 more words


Categories: General Woodworking

Tips from Sticks in the Mud – April Tip #2- C-Clamp Situations

Highland Woodworking - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 7:00am

 

Do you, like me, find it annoying when woodworkers find fault with this or that style clamp?

One of my favorite online woodworkers/podcasters recently said, “When I first started woodworking I bought a ton of C-clamps, mostly because they were cheap.  Now I wish I had that money back.  I never use them anymore.”

I respectfully disagree.  I find C-clamps to be exceedingly useful.  As you can see from the accompanying photo, I have a ton of them, in all sizes.

From 4" to 12" my C-clamps see a lot of action.  A 12" C-clamp can apply so much pressure, it will open a coconut.  Spread that pressure out with a caul and you have a clamp with a lot of reach combined with a lot of power.

From 4″ to 12″ my C-clamps see a lot of action. A 12″ C-clamp can apply so much pressure, it will open a coconut. Spread that pressure out with a caul and you have a clamp with a lot of reach combined with a lot of power.

Like most tools, there are situations where they are perfect, and situations where they are useless.

C-clamps can apply an amazing amount of pressure for minimal cost.  Use a caul to prevent marring your work.  There isn’t a clamp in my shop that could have done this job as well.

C-clamps can apply an amazing amount of pressure for minimal cost. Use a caul to prevent marring your work. There isn’t a clamp in my shop that could have done this job as well.

It is also not unusual to hear woodworkers putting down pipe clamps, but, they have their place and like my imported C-clamps, you can’t beat the price.  Some brands of pipe clamp heads, also called “jaws,” come with a nifty spiral spring-wire to protect the threads on the distal end, the end opposite the head.  While it’s not necessary to even have threads on that end, it is useful when joining two lengths of pipe together to make a really long clamp.

If the style of jaws you have doesn’t include that spring, you can inexpensively protect the threads with a threaded 3/4″ PVC cap.

It’s not terribly difficult to cross-thread the soft PVC on steel pipe.  To make the cap easier to install and remove at a later date, wrap a layer or two of Teflon thread tape on first.

It’s not terribly difficult to cross-thread the soft PVC on steel pipe. To make the cap easier to install and remove at a later date, wrap a layer or two of Teflon thread tape on first.

 

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home. Questions and comments on woodworking may be sent to DrRandolph@MyPetsDoctor.com. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Tips from Sticks in the Mud – April Tip #2- C-Clamp Situations appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

New Week

I'm a OK guy - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 4:31am
I had to work over the weekend so not much done in the shop. Some folks can come home after work, go to the shop and do several hours of productive work....That ain't me. About the best I can do is a little light tool maintenance, sharpen some iron if it is already sharp, wipe the dust off and put back in place the tools left on the work bench from the last time I was in the shop. That's about it.

I did receive a ECE Coffin Smoother I "won" off eBay. The Smoother was a pleasant surprise, the iron had been honed but other than that there was no evidence the plane had ever been used. Sometimes you get lucky. I've a "horned" old style ECE Smoother on the way, another eBay "win", hope it is in as good shape as the Coffin Smoother. As always, anything off eBay is a crap shoot.

I should get a couple of saws from Bad Axe Tool Works either today or tomorrow, the two saws will almost complete my collection of Bad Axe saws. The only one left is the new 12" dovetail saw, it looks like a clone of the TFWW dovetail saw. The TFWW dovetail saw is my favorite small dovetail saw, I expect once the tool budget recovers from the last two saws, in other words....next month, I will put one on order.

Back to the shop for a couple of hours work before the rest of the world awakes and starts demanding time.

One last thing, a friend sent this link to a youTube video about a day in the life of a line pilot. It doesn't get much truer, if you have ever wondered what it was like to set up front, watch. BTW, I received the link a couple of days before the German F.O. decided to take 150 with him.

Living the Dream https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=rNxz2hhSXuY





one done.....

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 1:22am
Unbelievable. Yesterday it snowed off and on but nothing stuck. This morning I got up at my regular time of oh dark thirty and I got a surprise when it got light. Overnight we got more snow and this load of the white crap stuck.  This is what I saw out my window at first light and it wasn't a robin digging for worms.

the view from my kitchen window
From the weather reports I'd been listening to all day it seems that I'll be having this same view on monday when I go to work. I'm starting to think that it'll be June before winter is finally done.

done
Between last night and today I got 7 coats of shellac on this. I applied some wax with steel wool and buffed it out. I'll give it to my wife tomorrow after the smell of the wax has dissipated.

back and side view
The back and bottom are 1/8" plywood. Even up close the plywood looks a lot like the maple sides.

no date on this one
My can of water based poly dried up so I will have to wait on dating and signing this. I haven't found a water based felt pen yet. Sharpies are alcohol based and they will bleed and run if I try to sign on the shellac with them.

new project
This upcoming project is something that I have had banging around in the brain bucket for a couple of months now. I got the bug for making it from the Brokeoff Mountain Lutherie blog here. I really don't want to make it to use but just to make. I got a thing for small/miniature tools and once it's done I'll put it on display. I have 4 wooden squares that I made that I don't use neither. This one will keep them company.

oak square
I am making the arms asymmetrical because I don't like a square to be square. I think having one arm longer than the other looks better. 

half lap done and it's cooking
I glued this oak miniature square with hide glue. Since the furnace is still kicking in, the regular readers will know where this is headed. I clamped it up on my big square to hold it that way. I'll still check it for square after it comes out of the clamps.

making one in pine
The pine square I am making to work out the kinks and practice on before I do the oak one. I split the tenon cheeks on the left one ok but the right one went south. Both pieces came from the same board and have similar grain. One worked and the other one is toast. I didn't make the two arms the same length so I cut this off and started again. I sawed that tenon out.

my latest plane re-visited
When I took a break for lunch I read a couple of comments about this dovetail plane. Everyone saw that the knicker was on backwards but me. My thanks to pointing that out as it probably would have taken me a while to figure that out.  There were other comments about this being a manufactured plane too. I initially thought it was a user made plane. I  decided to look it over again and pay attention to the fine print.

There is writing on both sides of the plane. I took that to be notes from whoever made this. After actually reading what was written I came to a different conclusion. Someone was using this plane to make one or to modify this one.

I also looked the plane over and I can see that this was made by Ulmia. There is a glued on sole and the upper body looks like beech.

more writing on this side too
I can't believe it didn't occur to me that the knicker was on backwards. I should have picked up on the bevel not facing into the waste area.

Ulmia stamp
When I first tried this plane out I assumed that round top of the plane iron meant it was a homemade iron. The metal looked a lot like the O1 steel I bought to make my froe.

threaded inserts are set deep
I don't think a DIY job would set the inserts so deep. All the ones I have had experiences with are either flush or slightly below the surface.

???
I don't know if Ulmia did this counter bored hole or if the previous owner did it. I wonder what the purpose of it is, whoever made it. Maybe this is a plane body for an ECE primus plane and this is the hole for the screw on the adjustable mouth. There is also a hole at the heel that is probably meant for another screw.

backwards knicker
I tried to move the iron over all the way to the left and right trying to line up the knicker. I couldn't get it close enough on either side. I took the knicker out and reversed it. I'll admit that this is something I couldn't see how it would matter. My spatial ability was being flushed down toilet trying to picture this knicker flipped 180 to line up with the iron.

fuzzy pic of the correct alignment
Flipping the knicker 180 lines it up with the outside edge of the iron.

pine practice square
I glued the corner half lap with yellow glue on this one. It cooked for about 1+ hours and I'm working on the cross brace. Doing the half laps on the frame and the brace wasn't easy. There wasn't a lot real estate to sit and swing my router plane on. I could do part of the half lap but not all of it.

saw kerfs
 I tried to chisel the half laps and that didn't work out. I wasn't able to get flat and consistent depths on the half laps. On this set of half laps  I sawed the kerfs down to the layout lines and then I tried to chisel until the kerfs were gone.  This worked partially but I still didn't get a consistent depth.

I used my router to get as much of the half lap to the same as depth as I could. I then chiseled the small bit I couldn't do with the router. From there it was put it together and check the fit. Take it apart and do some trimming and check the fit again. It took me a couple of dance steps before I was happy with the fit. I'm also glad that I decided to make one out of pine to practice on.

cooking
I didn't do the cutout work on the brace. I didn't forget it and I am thinking of doing it after it has set up.  The brace is proud of the two arms and I'll flush that up tomorrow after it has cooked by the furnace.

going to rehab another plane
I was going to do this one next weekend but I can't wait. This profile and how to make it has my taken hold of my limited attention span right now. A quick run over some 100 grit sandpaper showed that it is pretty flat as is.

back flattened up to 1200
wised up
I have taken to marking my sandpaper with the grit on the back. No matter what grit it is the back of all of the sandpaper is marked the same. The grit is marked in the middle on the sides. So as I ripped this into little pieces I lost the grit number. This is to give myself a heads up. Feeling it with my fingertips doesn't tell me the grit.

most of this I don't what grit it is
trying out the edging plane
This plane is an Ohio Tool plane which surprised me. I thought that this was an English plane for sure. Turns out it is a very grungy american made plane.

not working
The plane made a very shallow rabbet and that is it. It stopped cutting, and it sopped moving. It is wedged on this piece of 3/4" stock.

can't read this at all
I rubbed some chalk in this stamp to help the peepers out. It says something over 4. I can't make out what is stamped over the four. It's not complete and only a small portion of the bottom is visible.

different board (3/4")  and the same small rabbet and stalled plane
thinned the board down to 5/8"
some of it got rounded
The square portion of the plane didn't engage at all on this board. I am not doing something right here. Even though I couldn't read the top number on the stamp, I think it is a 3 which would mean this plane is meant for 3/4" stock. The width of the profile is a hair over 11/16".

3/4" stock fits in the bottom of the plane
3/4" stock again
I decided to give this board a helping hand by planing a 45 on it.

didn't help that much
The first run with the 45 did nothing and I got nothing from the plane. On the second run I made the 45 real steep and this is the profile I got. Doesn't match the plane iron at all.

1/2" stock
I got a slight round over on 1/2" stock. I am not ready to give up on this yet. On a bright note it didn't hesitate or have any problems planing the oak.

figured it out
This is one profile that I have been looking for over a year now. It just fell into my lap. This is a very simple looking profile that I like a lot.

it's the right side fence that is the key (or the left side one as you use the plane)
The outside fence is a wee bit longer then the other one. This is so you can register it against the work up high and have the square portion of the iron start to cut the profile.

like this
The square part of the iron cuts first and as the plane moves down the round part of the profile starts to cut.

profile starting to emerge
What I was doing wrong was trying to fit the plane over the edge too deep. The plane has to ease into the profile. Now that I know how to use this plane I'm sure the other one (different profile) will work the same way.

it does end grain too
I should have done this first before I did the long grain but I had to figure out how to use it first. And doing the figuring on long grain is way easy than end grain. Even though I did the end cut after the long grain ones, I still got almost no tear out. This is an easy plane to use to make this profile - now that I know how to use the plane to do it.

Maybe I can use some of what I learned here today and apply it to the #2 complex molder I tried to use yesterday.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is a pulicologist?
answer - someone who studies fleas

Conserving a c.1720 Italian Tortoiseshell Mirror – Laying Down Lifted Tortoiseshell

The Barn on White Run - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 7:04pm

The tortoiseshell surface of the mirror frame was replete with areas of delaminated and detached (lifted) shell veneer, with even more numerous areas that were delaminated but not detached as they were still adhered at their margins.

cIMG_8263

This was particularly prevalent at the seams of the shell pieces.

cIMG_8271

Nevertheless as most of these regions were stable I left them alone.  They are not at imminent risk, so I can always return to them should the situation change.

cIMG_8277
The main concern was those pieces flapping in the breeze, or in danger of becoming so.  Those were the areas where I needed to introduce adhesive underneath them, then clamp them in place until it dried.

I chose Milligan and Higgins 192 Special hide glue for my adhesive; it has more than enough shear strength, and is much more tacky quicker than the standard hide glue (eliminating the need to add glycerine as a tackifying plasticizer).  I soaked it overnight, 1 part glue to 2 parts distilled water, then cooked it twice on my coffee cup warmer before using it.

cIMG_8296

With my fingertips, or often with bamboo skewers and hors d’oeuvers toothpicks I gently lifted the edges of the tortoisehell and inserted my glue brush underneath, working it until there was excess glue present.

cIMG_8297

I then pressed down the shell by hand to swab off most of the excess glue, then laid down a piece of this plastic sheet (I really like food vacuum packing membrane for my gluing barriers; I bought several rolls on ebay for about fifty cents) followed by a shaped caul of polyethylene foam.

cIMG_8243a

I made the cauls from scraps of foam left over form various projects, hollowed out with a few strokes of a convex rasp.

cIMG_8292

When in place, their concave shape provides admirable clamping pressure on the convex surface of the mirror frame.

cIMG_8299

I placed a foam caul over each section being glued, followed by a piece of plywood backing and a clamp.  Extreme clamping pressure was not needed, only enough to hold the shell in contact with the substrate until the glued hardened.  I left it over night and removed it in the morning.

cIMG_8334

I was fortunate to have success with every glue-down, not always a certainly when working on a contaminated surface and substrate.

Plugging My Inappropriate Holes.

Inside the Oldwolf Workshop - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 2:53pm

One issue with the new workbench was the scars of it's past. Constructed of reclaimed barn beams scattered through the top were 7/8" inch diameter holes. They're related to the original joinery. The sad thing is my holdfasts are made for 3/4" holes and these holes just don't work.

I laid out and drilled a series of holdfast holes based on the "Patented Chris Schwarz Holdfast Plan" and my new holes became intermixed with the old holes (There's immature comic gold in that sentence) After working with mixed holes for a bit I became slightly fed up mistaking one for the other.


So I picked up some dowel and spent a little time today plugging my inappropriate holes.

I left them a little proud of the benchtop so once the glue sets up I can cut them off with a flush cut saw and plane them even to the benchtop.

Then I will no longer mistake one hole for the other.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf


Categories: General Woodworking

some leftover photos & more

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 12:59pm

I took today off, which means I only did woodworking for half the day so far. A few things rambling around during the last week. We made it out to the beach the other day for the first time since the winter hit hard.

first beach trip

The usual beach-combing, sand-building, and scenery-viewing. Then on the walk back, Daniel noticed this skull. I put the keys in the shot for scale.

skull scale

My what lovely teeth you had…really small, but fierce teeth. I woulda brought it home for the skull & bones collection, but it was still fleshy in places…

what teeth you had

 

Saw this in the yard today, it was cause for excitement.

first one

 

The view up the river, no ice.

up

 

 

I finished this bowl yesterday & today. Mostly finished, I’ll carved some stuff along its rim. Butternut, (Juglans cinerea)

bowl

Here’s one way I hold it for final shaping of the rims’ edge. Just some scrap blocks inside the bowl, to keep the vise from pressing against the upper edge.

trimming sides of bowl

Like the spoons, I lean towards odd-ball shapes. This one’s a bent limb, which results in the pith being off-center. So I made the centerline of the bowl ever further out-of-whack. That results in some unusual shapes. Which can be good, or can be fatal. Worked this time, I think.

top view bowl

If you are at all interested in hewing bowls, two things. I’m teaching it this August at Lie-Nielsen, https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/71

and otherwise, you might if you haven’t already look at Dave Fisher’s new blog about his carvings. Dave’s stuff is really inspiring. https://davidffisherblog.wordpress.com/

One other Lie-Nielsen thing – we have decided to try something new(ish) for my carving class this June. Usually we rive and plane some oak, and carve patterns based on the 17th-century stuff. This time, we’re attempting to carve and assemble a small box.

So instead of riving the stuff, it will be riven & prepped ahead of time. Then we’ll concentrate on carving and cutting & assembling. 2 days – whew. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/61

I’ll be doing the whole-soup-to-nuts version of the carved box at Marc Adams’ school as well as the New English Workshops in England. I’ll write in detail about those workshops later this week.

http://www.marcadams.com/available-classes/handskills/1679/

http://www.newenglishworkshop.co.uk/

 

 

 


Pages

Subscribe to Norse Woodsmith aggregator - General Woodworking


by Dr. Radut