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2017 Schedule of Events

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 7:42am

 

Below are the events we have scheduled for 2017. If you’d like to take a workshop we’re teaching or chat with us in person, look below to see if you can make it out to any of these events. We hope to see you this year!

 

Center for Furniture Craftsmanship – March 10th Presentation: “Why I Cut the Cord” 

I’ve been invited to present this coming Friday to the Furniture Intensive students at CFC about how pre-industrial methods has informed my furniture making. Read about the school here.

 

Fine Woodworking Live 2017 – April 21st - 23rd – Southbridge, Mass.

Fine Woodworking’s live event. We’ll be there as a vendor. Looks like a great show with top-notch presenters. Visit the official website here.

 

Haystack Mountain School of Crafts – May 6th Workshop: “Introduction to Hand Tool Woodworking”

This is a class offered for local residents to introduce students to the fundamentals of hand tool woodworking. I count it an honor to give back to the community in this way. Read about it here.

 

Handworks 2017 – May 19th - 20th

Handworks needs no introduction. Mike will be there with the entire M&T booth. You can buy mags, DVDs, t-shirts, etc and chat about hand tool woodworking. Unfortunately, I am quite sure I won’t be able to make this one because my third baby will be born right around the event. Talk about bad planning! Visit the website here.

 

Lie-Nielsen Workshop - June 17th - 18th Workshop: “Cut the Cord: Build a Table with Hand Tools”

This is a hand tools meat-and-potatoes kind of class - an introduction to the hand-tool-only approach to building a table. I’ll bring period originals along for students to examine to help inform their working tolerances. The goal is to show how to work with pre-industrial efficiency. Sign-up for the workshop here.

 

Lie-Nielsen Open House – July 7th - 8th

Always a highlight of the year. Come hang out with like-minded hand tool fanatics. Hand tools, Maine, lobster and beer. No cover charge. What more could you ask for? More info here.

 

Pre-orders for Issue Three Open! – September 1st 

We are shifting the schedule of M&T #3 a bit earlier so that as we begin our twice-a-year schedule, it will be at convenient times of the year. Yes, you heard that right… starting with #3, M&T will be biannual. (Yes, biannual is the right word. You’re thinking of “biennial”.)

 

Issue Three Packing Party – Last Week of September or First Week of October

Come join us for the big packing party for Issue Three! We will be wrapping mags, filling ourselves with delicious food, and communing over craftsmanship. Read about the Issue Two party here. It was such a blast and went off so smooth that we’re doing it again!

 

Fall – The Big “Mystery” Project Yet to be Announced...

Mike and I will be consumed with this project through the fall. We will be talking much about it in the near future.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

2017 Schedule of Events

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 7:42am

 

Below are the events we have scheduled for 2017. If you’d like to take a workshop we’re teaching or chat with us in person, look below to see if you can make it out to any of these events. We hope to see you this year!

 

Center for Furniture Craftsmanship – March 10th Presentation: “Why I Cut the Cord” 

I’ve been invited to present this coming Friday to the Furniture Intensive students at CFC about how pre-industrial methods has informed my furniture making. Read about the school here.

 

Fine Woodworking Live 2017 – April 21st - 23rd – Southbridge, Mass.

Fine Woodworking’s live event. We’ll be there as a vendor. Looks like a great show with top-notch presenters. Visit the official website here.

 

Haystack Mountain School of Crafts – May 6th Workshop: “Introduction to Hand Tool Woodworking”

This is a class offered for local residents to introduce students to the fundamentals of hand tool woodworking. I count it an honor to give back to the community in this way. Read about it here.

 

Handworks 2017 – May 19th - 20th

Handworks needs no introduction. Mike will be there with the entire M&T booth. You can buy mags, DVDs, t-shirts, etc and chat about hand tool woodworking. Unfortunately, I am quite sure I won’t be able to make this one because my third baby will be born right around the event. Talk about bad planning! Visit the website here.

 

Lie-Nielsen Workshop - June 17th - 18th Workshop: “Cut the Cord: Build a Table with Hand Tools”

This is a hand tools meat-and-potatoes kind of class - an introduction to the hand-tool-only approach to building a table. I’ll bring period originals along for students to examine to help inform their working tolerances. The goal is to show how to work with pre-industrial efficiency. Sign-up for the workshop here.

 

Lie-Nielsen Open House – July 7th - 8th

Always a highlight of the year. Come hang out with like-minded hand tool fanatics. Hand tools, Maine, lobster and beer. No cover charge. What more could you ask for? More info here.

 

Pre-orders for Issue Three Open! – September 1st 

We are shifting the schedule of M&T #3 a bit earlier so that as we begin our twice-a-year schedule, it will be at convenient times of the year. Yes, you heard that right… starting with #3, M&T will be biannual. (Yes, biannual is the right word. You’re thinking of “biennial”.)

 

Issue Three Packing Party – Last Week of September or First Week of October

Come join us for the big packing party for Issue Three! We will be wrapping mags, filling ourselves with delicious food, and communing over craftsmanship. Read about the Issue Two party here. It was such a blast and went off so smooth that we’re doing it again!

 

Fall – The Big “Mystery” Project Yet to be Announced...

Mike and I will be consumed with this project through the fall. We will be talking much about it in the near future.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Wax & Stickers on Saturday

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 7:34am

 

lizard_wax1_IMG_3654

Wax for sale (lizard not included).

My daughters will be selling their soft wax and stickers at our storefront on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. We’ll have them set up to take cash, check and major credit cards.

The stickers are $5 for a set of three. Wax is $12 for a 4 ounce tin (or two tins for $20). We’ll also have some wax out for testing if you’d like to give it a try on some sample boards.

Note that this is on Saturday only. Maddy has class on Friday and Katy has other obligations.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Shipping Update: ‘Roubo on Furniture’ & ‘Roman Workbenches’

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 5:30am

r2_blue_twineThis is my mistake. I thought our warehouse had finished shipping all the copies of “With All the Precision Possible: Roubo on Furniture.” In truth, the last of the orders were boxed up yesterday and go out in the mail today.

Apologies for the error. And personal apologies to Meghan Bates, who has been fielding a lot of your questions because of my error.

Your book is on the way. It won’t be long now.

Additionally, some of you have been asking where your copy of “Roman Workbenches” is because our software has reported your order as “fulfilled.” This is a software glitch (Yay! Not my fault). This book is on press now and should be shipped in April.

Thank you all for your patience.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Looking For A Podcast?

360 WoodWorking - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 4:45am
Looking For A Podcast?

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve heard from a number of regular listeners about the missing 360 With 360Woodworking podcast. Just to calm some of the talk, 360 Woodworking is working on new ideas concerning the podcast. There are a few announcements to be made after a couple of details get worked out. A couple of snags have developed.

Fear not regular listeners. The 360 With 360Woodworking podcast will reappear in the next week or two with a new format and new concept, but with the same great woodworking information.

Continue reading Looking For A Podcast? at 360 WoodWorking.

new molding plane road tested.......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 12:32am
Today was cold but not as cold as it was yesterday. It turns out that I was OTL on the weather report big time. Tomorrow (tuesday) it is supposed to start warming up and rain all day off and on. Wednesday is the day the temps are supposed to get close to 60°F (15°C). Along with the warm temps it is supposed to be partly cloudy. I double, triple checked this for accuracy but this is New England. We could also get buried under a blizzard or be hit with a nor'easter. So I'll wait and see what shakes out.

the 79 sold
Someone asked for it but I didn't get the address today. I shipped out the tequila box and had a very pleasant experience at the post office. Both clerks were waiting on customers and I was in and out in less than 5 minutes.  The 79 will go out once I get the address.

Since Wally World is next door to the post office, I made pit stop there too. I needed some moo cow juice and cereal. Wally World has good prices on cereal but didn't have any 2% milk. Sometimes you have to settle and I did with 1% milk.

no interest from anyone
This block plane is like the freckle faced, red headed, cross eyed, stuttering, step child. Nobody loves this or wants it. This is the second time I've tried to unload this so I'll keep it. It does take good shavings and the only hiccup with it is the missing front knob. None of these knobs came close to fitting.

this #4 knob doesn't look that bad
There isn't anything except epoxying this in place that might work securing this knob.  That is all I can think of right now. I'm even doubtful that epoxy would work here.

the stem is threaded
I have a small 1/2" threading tap(s) that might work. It's worth a try. (In hindsight I should have measured it first.)

piece of ash left over from the plane iron storage
 I roughly bandsawed this round and drilled a3/8" hole in the center. It's been over a million moons since I last used this and I'm not sure that I drilled the right sized hole. And did I drill in the right grain orientation too?

starter tap and a bottoming tap
the threads don't look so good
It didn't fit on the stub. It was too loose and I didn't feel any threads engaging.

size of the outside diameter of the threads on the stub
OD of the 1/2" tap
As we would say in the navy, 'don't piss into a head wind if don't want to get wet'. I'll have to think of something else.

flattened the back
This plane came from Josh at Hyperkitten. I wanted to use this plane to profile the fence for the plane storage but it was dull and wouldn't make a shaving. The back flattened quickly and this was the easiest one I've done to date.

very good match between the sole and the iron
done up to 1200
There is a flat on the right and it looks like there is another on the left. There is no flat there, it is a S shape.

flat on the right has a slight hollow
DMT paddles
I tried to use these to sharpen the flat but I stopped. The flat is small and I was afraid that I was rounding it over more than I was getting it flat. Especially worrisome was that I wasn't making the hollow any smaller.

used the stones
I felt until I had the flat on the stone and I pulled it  back towards me. I didn't push it forward at all, just backwards. I did 10 strokes on each of the 3 diamond stones and finished up on the 8K japanese water stone. Then I stropped it.

nice and shiny
stropped the S curve too
the profile
There isn't much of a fence and there are no spring lines to guide me. These planes are a wee bit more temperamental to use then ones with bigger fences or spring lines.

pretty profile
I got my profile but I didn't do it correctly. I have a burnish mark on the top of the board and I shouldn't have any. That burnish mark tells me I did not hold the plane in the right orientation. I had it pitched forward too much inboard over the board and bearing down on that too hard.

that is it for the fence contact area
No matter what, you have keep the same attitude on the plane until plane stops cutting. Moving the plane inboard or outboard even a few degrees will throw the profile off. This is pass #2 and I didn't have any burnish marks on top of the board.

first pass on the bottom and second one on top
Both profiles look good and this is a pretty profile that will look good on an edge.  The bottom shoulder is slanted and the top one is square. That is due to how I held the plane as I went down the board.

close up pic
First pass on the bottom and second one on top.

repeated it on the other edge - passes 3 and 4

better pic of passes 3 and 4
Once I had part of the profile on the edge of the board, I used that to help me plane. I tried to get whatever portion of the profile that was showing even end to end. I have learned a few things about playing with molding planes this past week. I have one profile that I haven't had luck making that I'm going to try it again now.

ready to stow in the plane till
 Before I put any planes back in the plane till I retract the iron. It isn't so much so to protect the iron, I do it mostly to keep the iron from chewing up the shelf the plane rests on.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What are you suffering from if you are hyperthymic?
answer - from being exceptionally positive in  mood and disposition

Drill Bits for Chairs & Staked Furniture

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 12:00pm

Making large-diameter mortises for chairs or staked tables requires big drill bits and a way to drive them. Usually a drill press won’t work because the workpiece is too large and the angles are too odd. So here are some bits that work – and some to avoid. To drive big bits (1-1/4” and bigger), you probably need a corded drill. I’ve tried using a brace, but that’s a tall […]

The post Drill Bits for Chairs & Staked Furniture appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Lie Nielsen Block Plane Upgrade

David Barron Furniture - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 11:46am

The latest edition of Australian Wood Review is out. This is an excellent magazine that's well worth subscribing, there's only four issues per year so the content quality is very good.
In the tool review section this caught my eye, an upgraded adjuster nut for the lie Nielsen block plane. By using a free running bearing it reduces the risk of loosing lateral adjustment when moving the blade in and out. Ingenious but simple and a bargain at $29 Aussie dollars.
Robert Howard also produces them for Lie Nielsen low angle and shoulder planes.
http://www.thetoolworks.com.au/index.php?route=product/category&path=35_372


A fascinating article on Kumiko also caught my eye.


And six pages on the Mujingfang factory in China is also very interesting.


Categories: Hand Tools

WIlliamsburg in Action!

Peter Galbert - Chair Notes - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 11:46am
Here is a short video that Ben Strano from Fine Woodworking shot of me bending the c arm in front of a packed crowd.  Bending is always magical, as the solid wood gives way and contorts, your sense of reality is challenged, kinda like floating. But like all feelings of floating, one is also highly aware of how far you could fall...the 250 onlookers gives that height a little boost! Thanks again to Ben for sharing the video
And here are some other times that you can see me in action or join me for a class.

April 10-15 at North Bennet Street School in Boston, I"ll be teaching the Balloon Back/ Fan Back chairs (your choice of style and turnings). It's a 6 day class with 8 students and I'll have a great helper in the form of Eli Cleveland. We are also going to be adding a Continuous Arm class in August and this course serves as the prerequisite for taking the it. Here is a link for enrolling.
I hope to see you there. I am really enjoying my relationship with the school and hope to continue offering and expanding the chairs that we are building. These classes have been some of the best I've had a chance to teach, with great facilities and small class size, everyone gets lots of attention and we have a great time.


I will be at Handworks in Amana, Iowa May 19-20 again this year, I love this event and can't wait to catch up with everyone.

I'll be back in Maine for the Lie-Nielsen open house on July 7-8, as usual, because it's such a great time to catch up with my friends who come every year and meet some new ones.

I will also be teaching a Perch making class overs two days at Lie-Nielsen in Maine on the weekend of July 22-23. This class was a blast last year and I'm looking forward to it.

I will also be at the Greenwoodfest here in Massachusetts, but I hear that it's sold out. For those who made it in, I look forward to meeting and seeing you!

I will probably have at least one more class in the fall at North Bennet Street, but for the most part, I will be spending this year making chairs and playing with my dog...and that's true.


Categories: Hand Tools

Rocking Chair Class

Heritage School of Woodworking Blog - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 10:30am

We had a great rocking chair class last week! Congratulations to all those who finished the class with an heirloom rocker!!  These chairs can be passed from generation to generation. Ironically at least two of the students were building a chair for their children who were expecting a child, what a great gift for a […]

The post Rocking Chair Class appeared first on Heritage School of Woodworking Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Chair scrape made for Paul Hamler You Tube channel

Hamler Tools - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 9:28am


Easy style chair scrape made with a few common hand tools.
Categories: Hand Tools

A small barn for the summer house 9, painting the windows.

Mulesaw - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 8:21am
After preparing all the individual pieces for the windows, they were assembled. I used a plane for adjusting the size to a pleasing reveal all around each one of them.
The flat parts of each window were also smoothed with a plane, to ease any small differences from the manufacturing.

I consulted Olav for some advice, and he suggested that the traditional way to go would be to coat the rabbet for the glass twice with shellac prior to painting and adding glaziers putty. The reason behind this approach should be that the shellac keeps the putty "soft" longer, because it prevents the linseed oil from migrating from the chalk and into the wood. 

While I am not be someone who dives into testing new stuff, I am normally ready to try out something old and tested straight away. So I took Olavs advice and used up the remaining shellac mixture I had left over from the travelling bookcases.
While I was at it, I also coated all the knots with shellac.

The hardware for the windows look good in my opinion, but it is the most traditional way to cover it in paint as well, that actually made painting a bit easier, since I shouldn't try to avoid getting paint anywhere.
For the painting itself I have strapped a frame to the workbench and mounted the windows on it. That way I didn't have to invent any work holding for the painted windows. The outside of each frame will not be painted since it will be hidden inside the wall. So it seems to be a fairly efficient way of doing it.

The biggest obstacle was Bertha who found it incredible interesting that I was mowing a small paint brush up and down, so she came close to have a look. I managed to get her ushered away with only a few white parts on her coat of fur.

Complete window.

one large and two small windows painted.

Inside corner with shellac applied.

Categories: Hand Tools

Making My Straightedge

Paul Sellers - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 8:01am

Friday 10th February 2017 I made my first straightedge from oak, an offcut scrap but quarter-sawn nonetheless. That one’s still in the US somewhere. Today I use another made also from oak and yet another offcut scrap. Mostly I’ve kept them shorter than say four feet long because I have a spirit level that’s 122cm (48″) …

Read the full post Making My Straightedge on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

News! Don Williams to Attend the Lie-Nielsen Event

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 5:12am

don_l1010023

Don Williams, the author of “Virtuoso” and the ringleader of the A.J. Roubo translations, will attend the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event this weekend at Braxton Brewing in Covington, Ky.

Don will be signing books and (no doubt) spreading his wisdom on historical finishing techniques. So bring your copies of “Virtuoso” and Roubo translations. If you ordered the standard edition of “Roubo on Furniture” you’ll receive it this week. They all went out in the mail late last week.

img_6470-copy narayan2_IMG_0160

And Don isn’t the only Lost Art Press author who will be attending the Lie-Nielsen event this weekend. Narayan Nayar, the photographer for “Virtuoso,” will be there. And Matt Bickford, the author of “Mouldings in Practice,” will be demonstrating both days.

I’ll be there. And, as you know, I’ll sign anything. So bring your books.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

plane iron storage......

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 12:34am
It was 7 frigging degrees fahrenheit this morning when I woke up. For the non imperial guys, that is minus 13.3 celsius. It is march 5th and we have single digit temperatures before the sun rises. As cold as it was there wasn't any frost on the truck or car. But I did have frost on the inside of the back screen door.  Tomorrow is supposed to get close to 60°F (15.5°C). I guess the in like a lion and out like lamb is playing out now.

chunk of ash
There are 13 dadoes for the iron storage and I didn't want to make it in a softwood. I also didn't want to make it in a wider piece of hardwood. This was the smallest piece of ash I had and I think the width is just right.

backed up the first one
I moved the first dado back to 1 1/2" so I had room to get my hand in here to take it out. First dado is done for the 10 1/2.

2nd dado
I knifed a line and sawed down on them. I'm using this also as an exercise in sawing to a line. I didn't do so good on the first one. The walls are pretty straight but I overshot the depth.

removing the waste with a 1/8" chisel
I did the removal from both sides. I made a vee coming from the bottom going to the top. I kept at it until I flattened it out.

back side of the saw cut
I was trying to end my saw cuts on the gauge line and I did ok on the majority of them. The backsides of the saw cut wandered a bit off the line. Overall, over the 26 saw cuts, they were fairly straight and plumb.

used the saw cuts for the chiseling depth
I couldn't find a router with a 1/8" cutter. LN makes a 3/32" iron as does Lee Valley. Lee Valley makes a 1/16" cutter but neither makes a 1/8" one. This depth isn't critical in that it needs to be dead nuts flat. Close to flat with no rocking is what I'm shooting for.

gave up on the saw cuts
2 done with 11 to go. Already made a change in the spacing. My layout had 3/8" between the dadoes and I changed it 1/2". I found it easier to use the iron themselves to see how flat the bottom was.. The smallest little bump will make them rock.

how I got the dado depth
I set the gauge to be a frog hair under the screw. The 10 1/2 and the #3 were the same, the rest of the irons were all different.

#3 above, this is a 4 1/2"
Each iron increased roughly an 1/8" over the proceeding ones.

it's a rocking
Leveling the bottoms of the dadoes turned out to be much easier to do than I thought it would be. I was able to do all 13 without any major hiccups. I know this one is too high because of the screw. That should be a lot closer to the top of the dado.

two more to do
I have some empty dado slots but they should be filled up next week. I found and ordered two more #4 irons and chipbreakers and a couple of #3 chipbreakers. That will give me 3 iron/chipbreakers to swap out on them. I also ordered a #8 chipbreaker for the solo #8 iron.

I got this many irons because I hate to sharpen. It always seems too that the need to sharpen comes right in the middle of something. With at least two irons for each plane (except for the 10 1/2), I can swap out the dull iron and put in a fresh sharpened one.

my depth gauge
The line on the board is the top of the drawer.  This is the #8 iron and I am just under the wire. The two dadoes for the #8 irons were the deepest ones I had to do.

first hiccup
My saw cut for the LN iron is tapered. It fits on the left side but is a very tight fit on the right.

hiccup #2
The second dado isn't tapered, it's too narrow and the iron won't fit at all. I couldn't find a file or rasp to fit in the dado so I could widen it. Had a crazy thought to chisel the end grain but the chisel wouldn't fit neither. I fixed the two of them on the tablesaw.

they fit snug now
the lineup minus the new kids coming
where they are going to live
A quick couple of in and outs with the drawer and the irons were still in place. (I fixed the one tilted 4 1/2 iron)

cut hazard
I could put the sharp end going the other way up against the drawer side but I like it this way.

need a fence here
it's sharp
I am going to mold the top edge of the fence so it isn't just a square edge.

anointed with blood
rounded over the top edge
this turned out pretty good
screwed it in place from the bottom
The fence is just screwed in place with no glue. I don't won't this to be permanent case I want to change it down the road.

can't screw this
The back is for future expansion so I don't know if a screw will be in the way.  I could put one at the front but I may want to do something there too. I like having this without screws and nails to work around so I had to think of another way of securing this.

OBG and rub blocks
using a practice astragal molding
I sawed this off the board and then sawed off four pieces to use as rub blocks.

done
I put two blocks at the front and back. That iron holder is a snug fit front to back so the four  rub blocks should keep it from moving.

This is all I did in the shop today. I planned on setting the kitchen sink cabinet but that didn't happen neither. Instead I slept and watched a couple of my DVDs on planes.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was Major Walter C Winfield?
answer - He created Sphairistikè in 1873 which became the modern game of tennis

New Stickers This Week

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 12:53pm
948749 948750 948751

 

My daughter Maddy will begin mailing out a new set of stickers this week. She ran out of the previous design last week, so if your SASE is in transit you likely will receive the new designs.

The new stickers include:

  1. A round sticker with the Lost Art Press emblem and the “farting divider,” as some people have called it.
  2. A die-cut sticker in the shape of the English A-square from the cover of “The Anarchist’s Tool Chest.”
  3. A full-color portrait of A.J. Roubo to commemorate the release of “With All the Precision Possible: Roubo on Furniture.”

Want a set? You can order them from her etsy store here.

Or, for customers in the United States, you can send a $5 bill and a SASE (self-addressed stamped envelope) to Maddy at:

Stick it to the Man
P.O. Box 3284
Columbus, OH 43210

As always, this is not a money-making venture for me or Lost Art Press. All profits help Maddy squeak through college without debt. Also, as her 21st birthday is coming up on March 22, some of that money might go to buying cider.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

In memory of Steve LaMantia

In memoria di Steve LaMantia




Maybe Steve LaMantia's name does not mean anything to you, but you surely know the thing that he gave a name to: the Scary Sharp (with the TradeMark symbol of the course).
Steve has recently passed away and although I do not know him personally, I have often used the scary sharp method and so I am glad to remember him with an article I wrote four years ago.
In Italian only, sorry.

Forse il nome Steve LaMantia non vi dice niente, ma sicuramente conoscete la cosa a cui lui ha dato un nome: lo Scary Sharp (con il simbolo del TradeMark ovviamente).
Steve è recentemente scomparso e anche se io non lo conoscevo personalmente, ho usato spesso il metodo scary sharp e quindi mi fa piacere ricordarlo con un articolo che scrissi 4 anni fa.


+++++++


Un'affilatura da urlo


Era il Novembre del 1995 quando un tale di nome Steve LaMantia scriveva un messaggio sul newsgroup (gli antesignani degli odierni forum) rec.woodworking, descrivendo il suo inconsueto metodo di affilatura. Riassumendo molto, egli aveva sostituito alle pietre e alle coti, alcune striscie di carta vetrata di grana via via più sottile incollate su una lastra di vetro. Egli chiamò quel metodo "sandpaper sharpening", ma concluse scherzosamente il messaggio scrivendo che con quel metodo le sue lame erano diventate paurosamente affilate, "scary sharp", e da allora quel termine entrò nell'uso collettivo per indicare l'affilatura ottenuta per mezzo delle carte abrasive.

Da quel giorno è passata molta acqua sotto i ponti. Sullo scary sharp si sono scritti fiumi di parole che trovate facilmente con Google e torrenti di filmati che trovate su YouTube. Mi scuso per queste banali figure retoriche fluviali, ma probabilmente sono stato influenzato da questa primavera particolrmente piovosa.
Inoltre in questi anni sono stati sviluppati nuovi supporti abrasivi, sempre più efficaci ed efficienti. Ma lo scary sharp è in fondo ancora quello di allora: utilizzare le carte abrasive fissate su un supporto piano e rigido, in luogo delle pietre e delle coti.

Questo metodo presenta dei vantaggi e degli svantaggi rispetto agli altri sistemi. Facciamo, per esempio, un contronto con le pietre ad acqua giapponesi (japanese waterstones), che sono uno dei mezzi attualmente più utilizzati.

Il costo è sicuramente l'aspetto più evidente dello scary sharp: con un piccolo investimento iniziale si riescono ad ottenere affilature di qualità pari a quelle ottenibili con un set di pietre giapponesi che possono costare anche diverse centinaia di euro.
Quindi, da questo punto di vista, è sicuramente il miglior metodo per il neofita o per chi non deve affilare quotidianamente i propri ferri. Se invece dovete affilare frequentemente, sul lungo periodo le pietre diventano più convenienti.

Un secondo vantaggio dello scary sharp, ma che per importanza io metterei al primo posto, è che mentre le pietre giapponesi con l'uso si concavizzano e vanno ri-spianate con regolarità, il supporto delle carte abrasive, che solitamente è una spessa lastra di vetro, rimane sempre piano.

Il terzo vantaggio dello scary sharp è il passaggio più graduale da una grana all'altra, che diminuisce i tempi di affilatura. Mi spiego meglio: nelle pietre giapponesi, le particelle abrasive che si fratturano nel processo di affilatura e diventano inservibili, si staccano dalla pietra e vengono spinte via grazie al movimento dei ferri e all'acqua in sospensione, lasciando il posto alle nuove e fresche particelle abrasive sottostanti. La granulometria delle pietre è quindi costante.
Nelle carte abrasive invece, c'è un solo strato utile e le particelle abrasive che vengono frantumate diventano di grana più fine. La granulometria delle carte abrasive è quindi decrementale e il passaggio da una carta di grana grossa ad una di grana più fine è più dolce.

Infine c'è il fattore "rottura di scatole": le pietre, una volta acquistate e riposte in una bacinella d'acqua sono subito pronte pronte all'uso, invece con le carte abrasive, bisogna ritagliarle, preparare il supporto, incollarle o fissarle in qualche altra maniera al supporto e spesso quando viene il momento di usarle ci si accorge che ce ne manca qualcuna e quindi bisogna telefonare a Cristian per farsele spedire urgentemente.

Analizzata la teoria e se l'avete saltata non vi biasimo, vediamo di addentrarci nella pratica.
Come ho già anticipato più volte, lo scary sharp non è altro che l'uso di fogli di carta abrasiva di grana sempre più fine fissati in qualche maniera che vedremo ad un supporto il più possibile piatto e rigido.
Quest'ultimo può essere un pezzo di MDF o di truciolare melaminico di forte spessore, una lastra di marmo, un piano da rettifica in ghisa o in granito o un IPad, ma quello più spesso utilizzato è una lastra di vetro di almeno 1 cm. di spessore.

Per fissare le carte al supporto si può utilizzare la colla spray rimovibile. Si può usare anche dello scotch biadesivo, a patto che non sia spugnoso altrimenti, comprimendosi, rischia di arrotondare il filo degli utensili. Con alcune carte, come quelle che vedremo in seguito, si può sfruttare l'effetto ventosa creato dalla tensione superficiale dell'acqua.

Le carte vetrate utilizzabili per lo scary sharp, sono tutte quelle con un substrato rigido, tipo carta o plastica. Si va dalle carte vetrate comuni e grossolane che utilizzano come abrasivo il Carburo di Silicio, fino ai poliesteri abrasivi con polveri diamantate superfini utilizzate nelle applicazioni ottiche, passando per le carte abrasive di medio-fini che si usano in carrozzeria. Meglio evitare le carte telate o quelle con substrato spugnoso perchè, come suggerito sopra, comprimendosi tendono ad arrotondare il filo delle lame.

Le grane da utilizzare dipendono dalla situazione di partenza e dal grado di affilatura che si vuole ottenere.
Per i lavori di sgrosso, per esempio per aggiustare una lama sbeccata o per modificare l'angolatura del bisello, si può partire da una carta P100 e proseguire per gradi successivi fino dove si desidera, volendo anche alla grana P9000, in cui le particelle abrasive hanno una dimensione di 0.5 micron, che corrisponde approssitivamente ad una pietra giapponese di grana 20000.

Questo pressapochismo nelle equivalenze tra le varie scale che definiscono le granulometrie degli abrasivi è dovuto al fatto che i diversi istituti mondiali che definiscono gli standard, utilizzano dei sistemi di misurazioni diversi. Esistono alcune tabelle di conversione, ma non sono sempre chiare e coerenti tra loro.

Per chiarire ancora meglio in cosa consiste il metodo scary sharp, vediamo un esempio di affilatura eseguita con i 3M Lapping Films.

I 3M Lapping Films sono dei fogli di poliestere spessi 0.075 mm, cosparsi elettrostaticamente di particelle di ossido di alluminio e successivamente fissate con resina. Sono disponibili in varie granulometrie e sono stati inizialmente sviluppati per lavorazioni su fibre ottiche, sui dischi di memoria o per la lappatura piana in metallografia.

Le dimensioni dei fogli sono 215x280 mm (più o meno come un foglio A4) e si possono tagliare in strisce a seconda delle proprie esigenze.

Per fissare le stisce alla lastra di vetro, si può anche usare come al solito la colla spray, ma una particolarità di questi fogli in poliestere è che basta un po' d'acqua per creare l'effetto ventosa necessario per farli stare fermi durante l'uso. Si spruzza un po' d'acqua sulla lastra di vetro e poi si comprimono i fogli facendo uscire tutte le bollicine d'aria e l'acqua in eccesso e a quel punto i fogli rimarranno fermi durante l'affilatura. Così non c'è nemmeno bisogno di usare un solvente per togliere la colla rimasta sulla lastra.


Siccome le lame che ho utilizzato avevano bisogno soltanto di un'affilatura ordinaria, nel senso che non presentavano sbeccature o altri gravi difetti che avrebbero necessatato delle carte vetrate più grossolane, sono partito direttamente con i fogli da 30 micron, quelli di colore verde scuro. Facendo una media tra le varie scale di conversione, questi fogli corrispondono ad una pietra ad acqua di grana tra 400 e 500 oppure ad una carta vetrata P500.



Ho bagnato la lastra di vetro, ho steso la striscia con la parte lucida verso il basso, ho spruzzato un po' d'acqua sulla striscia e poi, tenendo la striscia con due dita, con la prima passata ho "strizzato" l'acqua in eccesso presente sotto la striscia in modo che si "incollasse" al vetro e ho iniziato col movimento avanti-indietro. Tra l'altro, essendo le striscie un po' più lunghe delle pietre tradizionali, ogni "corsa" è più produttiva rispetto alle pietre.


Quando ho cominciato a sentire la bava sul dorso ho dato una qualche passata anche a quest'ultimo e sono passato alla striscia di colore giallo, quella da 12 micron, che corrisponde più o meno ad una pietra ad acqua di grana tra 1000 e 1200 oppure ad una carta vetrata P1500.



Poi, seguendo la stessa procedura, sono passato alla striscia azzurra che ha una grana di 9 Micron, corrispondente alle pietre ad acqua con grana tra 1500 e 2000 o alle carte vetrate P2000.



Infine ho ultimato la procedura con la striscia verde chiara da 1 micron, corrispondente alle pietre ad acqua con grana tra 12000 e 20000 o alle carte vetrate P6000, raggiungendo un'affilatura a specchio, che come potete vedere ha prodotto dei risultati eccellenti. Da paura!


La durata dell'abrasivo dipende da molti fattori (come per esempio la durezza dell'acciaio, la larghezza della lama, lo spessore del bisello e le condizioni di partenza) ed è quindi difficile da calcolare, ma tanto per avere un'idea, con una sola serie di strisce ho affilato agevolmente tre pialle.


Categories: Hand Tools

Staked High Stool

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 10:38am

staked_bench3_img_4451

I didn’t intend to start revising or adding to “The Anarchist’s Design Book,” but new designs are gushing out of my sketchbook these days, so I’ve stopped resisting.

This stool design started with a Welsh stool from the 18th century and came together in two days. It needs a second prototype to reach the finish line, but it’s good enough to show. Here are some details if you are interested in designing your own.

The stool is 25-1/2” tall, which is perfect for me. I can sit on the bench with my feet resting flat on the floor. The stretcher is 6-3/4” off the floor, so when I put my feet on it, my legs are in a traditional sitting arrangement.

staked_bench2_img_4448

The seat is 1-3/4” x 12” x 20”. This gives you enough depth so you don’t feel as if you are falling off and you won’t cut off blood circulation to your legs if you sit back on the seat. (Also, 12” is a classic stool depth.) The 20” length is suited so you can place your hands on the seat to either side of your torso. This allows you to easily reposition yourself or to help give you a push if you wish to hop off the seat.

The 45° cuts at the back remove weight – visual and literal.

The legs are 1-3/4” double-tapered octagons and start life about 27” long. The double tapers meet at the point where the stretchers intersect the legs – a natural place for bulk. The front legs use the following angles: 26° sightline and 13° resultant. The rear leg has a 0° sightline and 22° resultant. These angles give the stool immense stability.

staked_bench1_img_4445

The legs have 1-1/4” diameter tenons at the top. They start out about 2” long. The tenons are not tapered on this design.

The stretchers start as 1-1/8” octagons and are turned. The front stretcher is a cigar shape and terminates at each end with a cove and a 5/8” diameter x 1” tenon. The T-stretcher is 1-1/8” diameter at the rear leg and tapers to 3/4” at the front stretcher. Both ends have 5/8”-diameter tenons. (Note I swiped this tapered tenon from Bern Chandley, a chairmaker in Melbourne, Australia.)

What am I going to change for Stool 2.0? I’m going to add a wide and flat chamfer all around the top of the seat and saddle the seat. I’m going to bulk up the legs and stretchers a bit to see what happens. I might replace the 45° angles on the seat to ellipses.

But the second prototype will have to wait. I have tea coasters (yes, coasters) to build for a special client.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: The Anarchist's Design Book, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

# 12 - screws - Schrauben

Old Ladies - Pedder's blog - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 8:49am
After a lot of testdrilling I made the holes for the screws in the spine. Phew! (Drilling exactly isn't the talent of me nor my drill jig.)

Nach vielen versuchen habe ich mich getraut, die Löcher in fen Giff zu bohren. Das ist nicht gerade meine Hauptbegabung (und auch nicht die meines Bohrständers).
Die M6 Schrauben warten noch auf das richtige Gewinde (12-24 UNC).

The m6 screws waiting for the correct pitch (12-24 UNC).
But it is enough to test the plane

Aber es reicht um den Hobel zu testen.
Um den Lack von der Platte zu holen habe ich dann aber sicherheitshalber doch den #80 genommen.

Took the #80 to do most of the work in definishing this table. Didn't want to risk to use the #12.
These plan save my lungs from a lot of potential sawdust.

Diese Hobel bewahren meine Lungen vor einer Menge Schleifstaub.
Categories: Hand Tools

Lie-Nielsen Event: Where to Eat & Drink

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 7:12am
otto_img_5730

Shrimp and grits at Otto’s.

There are a lot of great places to eat in Cincinnati and Covington, and I’m not talking about chili parlors. In fact, the only thing I’m going to say about chili parlors is this: They are the only place you can order a “child’s three-way” and not get arrested.

To make this list manageable, I’m going to focus only on establishments that are in Covington and downtown Cincinnati. If I covered other neighborhoods, it would be a book.

Covington
Otto’s: This is one of my favorite places for lunch, dinner and brunch. It has a small menu of Southern food, but everything is outstanding. Get the tomato pie for lunch. Otto’s is also one of my contenders for best burger in the city.

Bouquet: Great wine bar and good food made with local ingredients. I love the trout.

Frida 602: A bustling Mexican place that specializes in mezcal and tacos. Get the queso. You’ll thank me.

Cock & Bull: The best fish and chips in town and a draft beer list that is insane (Delirium Tremens on draft – dang).

Goodfella’s Pizza and the Wiseguy Lounge: Downstairs is a small pizzeria with New York style pizza (yes, you can order a slice) and beer. Upstairs is one of the best bourbon bars in the state and a great place to relax.

Commonwealth Bistro: A new Southern food restaurant on Main Street. I’ve only been once but I was blown away by the fried rabbit and biscuit.

Crafts & Vines: One of the friendliest bars in the city. Wine on draft (you read that right). Plus an inventive beer selection.

Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar: The bartenders know me by name here. An astonishing bourbon selection. The patio out back is one of my favorite places to hang out with a crackling fire and a bourbon.

Covington Coffee: Super-friendly family-run place. Great pastries and the best bagels (Lil’s) in the city.

Crepe Cafe: A relatively new shop on Pike Street. A cozy family-run place with really good sweet and savory crepes, plus espresso. One of my favorite places for lunch – it’s two blocks from our shop.

Point Perk: My other favorite coffee shop in town. The hours are limited, but the espresso and chai drinks are fantastic.

Coppin’s in the Hotel Covington: Open less than a year, this hotel is the jewel of the city. It’s less than a block from Braxton Brewing. The restaurant and bar are highly recommended for breakfast, lunch, dinner and brunch. Get the corn fritters, the 16 Bricks bread and… oh just get everything.

Inspirado: Around the corner from Braxton. Eclectic menu. Osso buco and street tacos? Yes please. A very friendly place – lunch, dinner and brunch.

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Pork ho fun at Kung Food.

Amerasia Kung Food: Don’t be fooled by the appearance of this divey-looking Chinese place. People come from all over the city for lunch and dinner. It also has one of the best selections of beer in the city. If you like noodles, get the pork ho fun (and ask them to make it a little extra crispy).

Riverside Korean: Authentic Korean. A karaoke room (yes, we’ve done it). Riverside never disappoints.

House of Grill: Tasty Persian food served up by the friendliest family in the restaurant business.

Keystone Grill: Family-friendly place for lunch, dinner or brunch. The mac and cheese varieties are great.

The Gruff: A pizza place in the shadow of the Roebling bridge. Fantastic pizzas (try the Italian meat pizza or the Margarita) plus local craft beer and one of the most inspiring views in the city.

Whew, Now Cincinnati
I’m going to keep this brief. This blog entry is turning into an opus already. All of these restaurants are less than a mile from the river. I’m also skipping places that are so popular (The Eagle, Bakersfield, Taft Ale House) that you can’t easily get in.

Sotto: The best restaurant in the city. Period. The first time my daughter tried the short rib cappellacci she cried. No lie.

Boca: The big brother to Sotto. A bit fancy, but unforgettable in every respect.

Maplewood: The best breakfast in the city. No question.

Mita’s: Beautiful Spanish restaurant with achingly good paella.

Nada: Upscale Mexican with a fantastic brunch.

Senate Pub: Go early. Poutine and the best hot dog I’ve ever had (brioche bun!).

Krueger’s Tavern: Delicious hamburgers and homemade sausage.

Taste of Belgium: Fried chicken and waffles. Great breakfast. Belgian ale on tap.

Morelein Lager House: A local brewery with a restaurant – the view of the Roebling Bridge and Covington alone is worth the trip.

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Sweet pea and bacon pizza at A Tavola.

A Tavola: My favorite pizza in the city. Neapolitan-style. Awesome wagyu-beef meatballs and bacon tapenade. Great wine, beer and cocktails.

Salazar: I vacillate between Salazar and Sotto as my favorite places in the city.

eli_img_1755

Pulled pork sandwich at Eli’s.

Findlay Market & Eli’s: A old open-air market and the pride of Cincinnati. On weekends we walk around, eat whatever smells good and buy sausages (Kroeger meat) for the week. Eli’s is adjacent and it’s my favorite barbecue joint.

OK, that should be enough to keep you fed for one weekend.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Personal Favorites, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

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