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Covington Storefront Open This Saturday

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 5:02am

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Though we’re on the eve of Handworks (and are a little ragged around the edges), we’ll open the Covington storefront this Saturday to the public with lots of good stuff to see.

Here’s a quick list of interesting objects:

  1. We should have some copies of our H.O. Studley poster to sell at the special introductory price of $20. (They are supposed to arrive today.)
  2. I have two repaired letterpress copies of “Roman Workbenches” we can sell.
  3. Come try out the new Crucible Design Curves. I have the prototypes at the store now. I’m not sure I’ll have complete sets packaged and ready to sell, however.
  4. We have lots of blemished and returned Lost Art Press books this month. They are 50 percent off retail (cash only and in-store only).
  5. Come check out the Swedish gateleg table I just finished (it ships to a customer next month). And I have a couple other pieces that are for sale, including one of my staked three-legged stools with the charred finish.

Plus all the usual stuff: all our books, T-shirts, stickers and gabbing about woodworking.

The storefront is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located at 837 Willard St. in Covington, Ky. The Covington Farmer’s Market will be running the same day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It’s a short walk from our store and a great place to get lunch or snacks. And pet a goat.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Lost Art Press Storefront, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Bamboo, DynaGlide, and Handworks 2017

Tico Vogt - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 5:00am

Bamboo is now used for the bearing and running surfaces on the Vogt Shooting Board. It is sealed with shellac, followed by Osmo Polyx-Oil, and then wax.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I use a product called DynaGlide Plus Dry Lube Cleaner to remove metal swarf from the Bamboo Runway and bearing strips. It also lubricates the plane sole and sides. You can see a video here.

 

 The final step in honing the secondary bevel for my shooting plane irons is to push them into the end grain of a Maple stick charged with 0.5 micron diamond paste and sliding side to side. This ensures that the burr is removed, while not dubbing the edge as stropping might. Shooting end grain puts a premium on having a keen edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve got a good line up of shooting boards ready for Handworks 2017, as well as Planing Stops and Clamp Clips . One is especially adopted for a wood shooting plane that Ron of Brese Plane will have for the event. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barn Courses 2017 Update

The Barn on White Run - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 4:46am

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May 23-27 Making a Ripple Molding Cutter – this is less of a workshop than a week long gathering of fellow galoots trying to design and build a machine to allow us to recreate ripple and wave moldings.  Material and supplies costs divvied up, no tuition.

This event is pretty much full, but I could squeeze in somebody who just has to be there.

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June 16-18  Make a Nested Set of Brass Roubo Squares – This is a weekend of metal working, as we fabricate a full set of nested brass squares with ogee tips, as illustrated in Plate 308 of l’art du Menuisier.  The emphasis will be entirely on metal fabrication and finishing, including silver soldering with jeweler Lydia Fast, and creating a soldering station for the workbench. Tuition $375, materials cost $50.

I still have one space left.

July 24-28  Minimalist Woodworking with Vic Tesolin

This class has been cancelled.  Vic and I are hoping to reschedule it for next summer.

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August 11-13  Historic Finishing – My own long-time favorite, we will spend three days reflecting on, and enacting, my “Six Rules For Perfect Finishing” in the historic tradition of spirit and wax coatings.  Each participant should bring a small finishing project with them, and will accompany that project with creating numerous sample boards to keep in your personal collections.  Tuition $375.

This class has one opening remaining.

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September 4-8  Build An Heirloom Workbench – I’m repeating the popular and successful week-long event from last year, wherein the participants will fashion a Roubo-style workbench from laminated southern yellow pine.  Every participant will leave at the end with a completed bench, ready to be put to work as soon as you get home and find three friends to help you move it into the shop.  Tuition and Materials $825 total.

This workshop has two openings remaining.

If any of these interest you drop me a line here.

Amana Here We Come!

Tools For Working Wood - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 4:00am

Were busy packing up the pallets to head to Amana, ready before we are for Handworks 2017. Handworks has a special atmosphere, one that reminds us of the best features of woodworking and living as craftspeople. We dont have a road team, so its always a scramble for us. But its well worth it. We really feel moved to be part of this community and grateful to Jameel and Father John and the rest of the Handworks team for establishing such a meaningful show.


Some of the things were packing: first, we have a new poster! Its a limited edition (100 copies - actually 99 ), three-color silk-screened, 19 x 25 poster, printed on 140 lb paper (very heavy) from the French Paper Company - that is, not from France but rather the French family who have been making paper in Michigan since 1871. Plane spotting is the responsibility of every woodworker, and this poster will help keep you vigilant about which planes are hanging in your shop or house. (the poster isn't on the website yet but will be next week before the show).


Another new addition to our treasure chest: spoon carving knives from Ben and Lois Orford. Periodically people ask me about the future of woodworking, and one aspect of woodworking that is growing ever more popular is spoon carving. Newcomers to woodworking are learning what veteran woodworkers know: Its wonderful to use your hands and craft something useful out of wood. And lets be fair, greenwood is much more forgiving than hardwoods, and a spoon project is much faster than a highboy. Orford tools have a wide global following, and we are the only place in the US to sell Orford sloyd and crook knives. Well also be bringing spoon carving knives and froes by Ray Iles. We like to offer you choices!


Well also be bringing lots of our most popular tools - Gramercy Tools holdfasts, saws, saw vises, hardware store saws, and finishing supplies, T shirts (a customer with already owns one of our Gramercy T shirts came by today to buy a shirt for his buddy and another one for himself, and declared, This is the best T shirt ever.), and more.


Amana here we come!

Giant Lion Sculpture Carved from Single Tree Trunk Took 20 People and 3 Years to Complete

Giant Cypress - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 3:58am
Giant Lion Sculpture Carved from Single Tree Trunk Took 20 People and 3 Years to Complete:

Golky, on a wooden lion sculpture installed at Fortune Plaza Times Square in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China:

The massive redwood lion was carved out of a single giant tree trunk by renowned sculptor Dengding Rui Yao and a team of 20 sculptors in Myanmar, over a period of three years. Once complete, it was transported 5,000 kilometers, arriving in China in December 2015. 

Hardware Cabinet – 55 Drawers & 1 Mystery

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 3:00am

A few months ago I purchased an old hardware cabinet at an antique store a few miles north of Wilmington, NC. It is not really a very large cabinet considering it contains 55 drawers – 37″ tall x 31-1/2″ wide x 8″ deep.

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The story that the antique shop owner told was that it had once been in a hardware store in Warsaw, NC. The cabinet was behind the cash register for easy access by the store owner for some of the smaller items the store carried. I have been to the town of Warsaw a couple of times since and tried to trace the cabinet’s trail but have hit dead ends on every lead. So, its origin is a mystery.

The construction of the cabinet is pretty simple, other than the shear quantity of joints involved. The case and drawers are all held together with nails, not a dovetail to be found (sorry Mr. Firley).

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There are several interesting things about it though, joinery aside. Most of the cabinet and the drawers came from recycled crating and cigar boxes. There is something interesting to see every time you pull out a drawer: old labels of all kinds, tax stamps and writing.

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Of course, there are also the hand-painted labels on each drawer front. This to me is the coolest part of the cabinet. Whoever painted them obviously was skilled, but there are subtle differences in style of the numbers and letters between drawers and sometimes on the same drawer.

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Two different styles of 3’s on the same drawer.

As far as when it was made, my guess is around 1900 from the cigar box labels and tax stamps that I have been able to date.

I just recently finished up a three-part article at WK Fine Tools building a copy of this cabinet (yes, I am still mostly sane after 113 dados). It is available here.

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— Will Myers


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

picture frame part III........

Accidental Woodworker - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 12:59am
After tonight's work it is looking like there is going to be a few more parts to this before I get it to the picture framer. Even if I could have done more, it still would have been a short day in the shop. My wife is coming home tonight and I want to cook something for her that she can warm up in the nuker. I'll be long dead in the bunky when she rolls in and I know she'll be hungry. I'll catch up with her on wednesday.

new torture test
I thought of this as I was carrying it from the tablesaw to the workbench. Can the frame withstand the shock of being dropped onto the bench from a height of about 12"?

no it can not
Repeated the dance steps from last night except I had two corners to glue this time. What are the odds that the remaining one will pop apart tomorrow?

setting up until tomorrow
 With the two corners clamped the two opposite ones decided to raise up off the bench. I clamped them down and I'll have to check this out tomorrow. A twisted frame will put me back to square one.

walnut bookshelf
Whenever I do projects that require finish on the bottom they usually get dirty. They get that way because I don't allow sufficient time for the finish to cure there. I am going to try something different here. I am going to apply the finish to the bottom and then let it cure for a few days before I flip it and do the rest of it.

went overboard
I got three coats of a 1 lb cut on this except for the top of the sides. I kept on going because after I got the feet done I wanted to see how the sides would look with finish on them. All the little weird looking areas are gone and I don't think they will be a problem now.

made a pit stop at the post office
This was easy - went in and grabbed a box and left. No interaction with the clerks at all or having to wait in line. And I have plenty of packing material from things I and the wife have bought in the last few weeks. I will pack up the #2 and bring it to the post office on saturday to ship it out.

Jim Bode emailed me twice today. Once to tell me that he another 5 1/2 coming in and he would send pictures of it. He also told me that the 5 1/2 that had 'damaged' stamped on it had sold.  Four hours later he emailed me again saying he had found the 5 1/2 I ordered originally. It was found on another shelf and he shipped it out to me today. It is looking like I can scratch this one off the list and concentrate on getting a #2 and a #10.

Time to go cook some chicken breasts.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is a rhykenologist?
answer - someone who collects wooden planes


A Pair of Forest Chairs – Part One

Pegs and 'Tails - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 9:19pm
I want to make four or five Windsor chairs that can remain permanently outdoors on the front veranda of the new house. As I have blathered on about forest chairs on numerous occasions, I thought I would begin with a … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Garage workshops

Oregon Woodworker - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 7:48pm
There isn't much question in my mind that the ideal situation for a workshop is a separate building built to purpose.  Well-insulated, lots of natural light, high-ceilings, wood floors ... the list goes on and on.  If there was a suitable place on my suburban lot, exactly that would happen in short order.

Reality for many of us is different; woodworking happens either in the basement or in the garage.  I am luckier than many in that I have a three-car garage, but it has to accommodate four hobbies-- gardening, tent camping, biking and woodworking--as well as the usual paraphernalia for home maintenance.  (The cars stay in the driveway.)  Woodworking gets the lion's share, but the space is just plain awkward.  It's not big enough, there's not a lot of available wall space, it can be too cold and there is almost no natural light when the garage doors are closed.  These are issues faced by many woodworkers and I hope this discussion will be useful.

Here's the garage from the street:



The two bays on the left are 20' deep and the one on the right is 24' deep.  The overall width is 31'.  The ceilings are 9 1/2' high.

My bench has been on the right side behind the single door since we moved here almost 4 years ago and I  am keeping it there.  One goal I have is to store everything I use regularly at the bench no more than a step or two from it.  I've been short on accessible storage next to my bench, so the first thing I did this spring was build floor to ceiling shelves along the right side of it:



60 lineal feet of shelves was a big improvement, although I do have to use a ladder to reach the top shelf.    An alternative favored by many is to install wall cabinets for tools, which would look nicer but not be more functional.  My personal preference is shelves.  They cost very little, are quick to build and have a lot more capacity.  Extending them to the ceiling allowed me to secure them to the top plate.

  On the left side of the bench, I have my tool chest and an antique butcher block that I will be using as a joinery bench.  I raised it up to be 38" off the ground.


This let me put my main bench back down to palm height, 35" in my case.


The flooring is utility mats made from recycled tires that I got at a ranch store.  As far as I am concerned, they are ideal because they create a vapor barrier, are easy on the feet and protect dropped tools.

Working at the bench in good weather is great because I can put the garage door up and have lots of natural light.  Because the garage doors lack windows, the shop feels like a dungeon when they are closed, even though I have half a dozen LED fixtures.  I had hoped to replace one section of the door with one that has windows, but neither the manufacturer nor the local distributor would consider it.  The best they can offer is a brand new door with the top two of four sections containing windows, at a cost of $1,200.  I am considering it but it aggravates me to replace a perfectly good door.  Right now I am thinking about building my own replacement section using polycarbonate for windows.  It looks like I could just unbolt the existing one and bolt on a replacement, using the existing steel supports around the perimeter and the same hinges.  I think I could keep it light enough to operate properly.

I'd really like to have no power tools in this space, but the deeper bay, electrical connections and other issues don't allow it, so I put the three power tools that I would replace if they failed in the back:  my bandsaw, drill press and power planer:


On the right, I have more shelves that are used primarily for hand power tools, paint and home maintenance supplies.

I am pretty satisfied with this section of the garage.  Once I solve the natural light issue, the remaining challenge will be heat for the winter months.  I'll post about that later.
Categories: Hand Tools

@ Handworks 2017 – Original Roubo Print # 263

The Barn on White Run - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 4:45pm

One of the most interesting things to me about these prints from L’art du Menuisier is Roubo’s depiction of how things are put together, such as the working mechanism of a tamboured roll top desk.  Print #263, “Further Developments of Roll-Top Desks and Other Writing Tables” illustrates the assembly of a coil-spring-driven roll-top desk and the manner in which the tambours are retracted and released.  I just think this is cool.

As with some of the other prints from my selection this one is a tiny bit askew as the copper plate and the page margins were not perfectly aligned, an artifact of hand-printing I find charming.  The page is in very good-to-excellent condition.

The image was drawn by Roubo and he engraved the plate himself.

If you have ever wanted to own a genuine piece of Rouboiana, this is your chance.   I will be selling this print at Handworks on a first-come basis, with terms being cash, check, or Paypal if you have a smart phone and can do that at the time of the transaction.

$250

Massive Mountain of Wax

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 12:30pm

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Katy has been busy – this weekend she made more than 100 jars of soft wax, which are up for sale in her etsy store. They are $12 each for a 4 oz. tin.

I’m not only the father of the Soft Wax High Priestess, I’m also a customer. I use the stuff on many of my pieces. While the wax is intended to be applied to the insides of casework (it’s fantastic for drawers) it also works really well on turnings, stools and chairs, projects such as the three-legged stools I’ve been building this spring.

I also use it on the wooden vise screws on my workbenches, tool handles and on iron and steel tools (we use her soft wax on our Crucible Improved Pattern Dividers).

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Katy’s business has taken over half of my workbench at home – and I couldn’t be happier. She makes it completely on her own and sources all her supplies (and buys it on her own credit card). It really is her business, and it’s hard to believe she’s only 16.

She’s even been approached by a few companies who want her to wholesale it (she can’t because there’s not enough margin).

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

You Never Know Where A Small Job Might Lead!

The Barn on White Run - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 4:45am

Recently I was contacted by JoeM about his newly acquired vintage Studley-era piano maker’s workbench.  His own eloquence suffices to tell the tale, although I edited it a touch for privacy and continuity and to format it since he wrote me multiple long missives on a (non-smart) cell phone.

I have found a piano makers work bench from Boston 1866.  It has the wheel vices, is 33 by 77 inches. The vice was shimmed with the makers committee member cards, from the Boston city council.

I also found a memo from Hallet and Davis 1891 setting the rates of pay for the piano makers.  It has six drawers and three smaller drawers inside, which are covered by a pull down front.  It has all the dogs.  

The end vice has a dog that passes through and slides.  

It also has a hidden pull cord that locks the drawers by a cool mechanism in back.

Anyway, I’m a carpenter who was lucky enough to find this bench in the cellar of a home in Springfield Ma.  I traded the bench for a 400 dollar job at the house.  I quickly called my friend who is an antique tool collector and described the bench.  He offered me 1000 dollars with out seeing it.  He finally told me what it was, and said hes only seen two such benches in 50 years of collecting!  

So the lady I traded for said it was her grandfathers, born in 1859.  She said it had been in a few businesses  around Springfield,one being Hampden Brewery, before it was returned to her, I really don’t want to ask her any more about the history in case this thing is valuable and wants it back.  Right now the bench is in my living room where I study it.  I seem to find something new each day.  

I’m glad I read your article of furniture conservation as I started doing minor repairs.  I glued a few cracks on the back side, but now will wait till further investigation.  I did not know what a science it was.    

One vise was attached to the bench and one was on the floor.  Strangely the one on the floor was fine, the one on the bench was repaired. Some one must have dropped it.  The vice face was snapped off and welded on, and get this BACKWARDS !!   So the big Question is do I get it repaired?   My best friend is the best machinist I’ve ever seen.  He does incredible things with steel.

The two bottom drawers have different pulls than the top five.They don’t look original to me, and they have been painted gold.

Back to the history, the cards shimming the vise (had to take it off to move it) were in remarkable condition.  The name I traced was Jairus A Frost.  He had two different street addresses on two different cards, suggesting the passage of time pointing to him as owner.  Some where in the Boston records I found his occupation listed as piano maker.  A friend of mine found an article in a news paper that said he was in the Boston Benefit Society.  The cards say Committee of Relief, address 38 Porter St and 484 Washington St, Boston.  One card lists him as vice-president January 1866 to 1877.  There must be more info on Jairus, I mean I found this info with my meager computer skills.

Note: I laid my Sabilla level corner to corner and it is dead flat at 162 years old.  

My wife hopes the bench is worth a ton, but I don’t, I want to keep it if I can.  Will send pics as soon as I can get my daughter to do it.

Joe and I spoke on the phone for a good, long time, and it was a delight on many levels.  I gave him some advice on the care and restoration of it, and the last time I heard from him he was going to keep it.

Great story, Joe!

The first ever official skottbenk expedition to USA

Norsk Skottbenk Union - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 4:40am
Norsk Skottbenk Union will have a stand at Handworks in Amana.

This week 6 members of Norsk Skottbenk Union are going to Iowa and Minesota in USA to meet up with American handtool enthusiasts. We are also going to do some research for old workbenches similar to our Scandinavian Skottbenk. We are familiar with an interesting workbench in Amana in Iowa. We are going to make a visit to see this bench for ourselves and also have our own stand at Handworks 2017 to show how the Skottbenk works. At Handworks we will meet workbench enthusiasts from around the world. The maker of the official apron for Norsk Skottbenk Union, Jason Thigpen at Texas Heritage will also be there.

About Norsk Skottbenk Union

Norsk Skottbenk Union are a group of craftsmen with a special interest in traditional workbenches and tools. We are focused on the use of the workbenches and tools and strive to get other craftsmen interested in theese matters. We belive the Norwegian woodworking tradition are important to keep alive. By making traditional workbenches, making new tool in a local tradition and use them in restauration work and other kind of woodworking we belive we can make a difference. Our tools and workbenches are based on extensive research of old tools, workbenches and historical records. We have also done some work with older master craftsmen to get to some of the intangible knowledge in their craft. Some of the results of this work are posted on this blog. We write in Norwegian for our Norwegian readers because we believe it is important that we use the language that is connected to the traditions in our craft. For you English language readers we have a category for English blog posts.

Our trip

We will start our trip 10. May and go to North House Folk School where we will stay to the 13. May. From there we will start our journey to Amana where we plan to come the 17. or 18. May. We might make some stops along our route from North House to Amana so we are glad for suggestions from you. Theese members from Norsk Skottbenk Union will go to USA and are possible to meet at Handworks 2017:

Jon Dahlmo. Blacksmith that have specialized in making woodworking tools for carpenters and joiners. For members he is a great source for plane irons, chisels and all kinds of special tools for woodworking. He run his own company Verktøysmia in Drevja. Photo: Roald Renmælmo Thor-Aage K. Heiberg. Joiner and Organbuilder. Trained in joinery both plugged and unplugged. Early member of Norsk Skottbenk Union. Enjoys the smell, sound and keen hand of traditional pre-industrial joinery and building conservation. Interested in toolmaking, and traditional woodworking handtools. Studied Technical building conservation and restoration work at NTNU and finished my bachelor degree in 2016, subject: The Sash window plane and Miter iron. Rediscovering a traditional 19th century sash window manufacturing process in Melhus and Meldal. Work as a woodworker and head of building conservations at Sverresborg Open-Air museum in Trondheim. Ivar Jørstad. Master Carpenter with a special interest in traditional carpenters tools. He is studying at a bachelor programme in traditional building crafts at NTNU university in Trondheim. He work as a restoring carpenter at Buskerud bygningsvernsenter. Siv K. Holmin. Have been working as a restauration carpenter, restoring traditional buildings for about 20 years. Focused on traditional working methods with traditional handtools. Have also done some intervjus/foto/filming documentation of working methods with elder people to understand and learn the handcraft. Teach woodworking and restoring. Traditional logging, pitsawing, splitting wood and hewing materials, making floorboard and dealboard with handplane in «skottbenk» and thatching traditional grassroofs with birchbark. Peter Brennvik. Have worked many years with ship preservation, boatbuilding. Interested in woodworking tools, planemaking, høvelbenk and skottbenk. Are now working on a bachelor degree in traditional building craft at NTNU.  INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/37o9/ SlettokseRoald Renmælmo
One of the founders of Norsk Skottbenk Union and active user of skottbenk and traditional handplanes. Have worked many years as a woodworker and restauration carpenter in Norway. My special interests and competencies are joinery, logbuilding, traditional logging, toolmaking and traditional woodworking handtools. Are working on a PhD in historic joinery at NTNU and Göteborg University. Teach as Assistant Professor in traditional building craft at NTNU in Trondheim. http://www.ntnu.edu/employees/roald.renmalmo
Categories: Hand Tools

partial joy in Mudville........

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 1:05am
I have the proverbial good news, bad news situation. And the good news is good but not super and the bad news isn't all bad neither. The good news is about the Stanley #2 and the not so bad news is about the certificate frame. All in all pretty good all around.

I was a wee bit jittery when I came home tonight because I wasn't sure what to expect with the frame. Whenever I make a mitered frame I always shake the crap out of it. I do every single side and I shake it like I stuck a wet finger in 220 volt outlet. My last frame didn't survive the first leg. I was hoping I would do better this time.


still flat on the bench
The clamp at the right in the middle was to keep the frame from moving as I clamped the corners. When I popped it off the frame was still flat on the bench. Good sign #1. Good sign #2 was the frame still was together after I took off the four miter clamps. Good sign #3 was the frame passing the shake test on sides 1 and 2.  One corner opened up on shake test with side #3.

I do this shaking test to ensure the frame is sound. If it can make it pass me shaking the crap out of it, it will make it to hanging on the wall.

the open corner
As luck would have I used hide glue on this. I warmed some up and put some on both sides of the miter. I clamped it and put it to set up on the tablesaw. Looks like one more day before I get to play some more with this. I have to saw splines for the corners and make a rabbet for the glass and matting to come.

my #2
She is a pretty looking plane in spite of the problems. The rosewood tote and low knob look great. This hasn't dampened my desire to get another #2. The outsides were sanded up to 320 and I stopped there.

the sole looks good which is confusing
I have a hump in this but when I sanded it I didn't get any indications of that. Can't explain that without getting a headache.

Patrick Leach answered my Email to him today and I was very much surprised by it. Instead of reading I had played with it and I owned it, and said he would take it back. Not only did he write and say he would take back the #2, he said I could also return the 10 1/2 that I had bought from him. I think he must have read my blog post on my woes with the #2 because I didn't mention the 10 1/2 in my email to him at all.

I wrote him back saying I would get the #2 back to him sometime this week but I was keeping the 10 1/2. I've been following his monthly for sale lists for years now and I don't believe that he knowingly put the 10 1/2 up for sale knowing it was repaired. He puts repaired tools up for sale all the time and always makes note it.

Him taking the #2 back and then offering to take back the 101/2 makes him a stand up guy in my eyes.  A lot of people I know say that his prices are high but I don't think so. I think that they are in line with other tool mongers I visit. I saw a #2 (type 13), with high knobs for $195 and another #2 that looked like a rusty door stop for $300 (he said it was a pre-lateral #2). I picked this one from Pat for $215 because I have bought so many other good tools from him. Maybe I'll get lucky and he'll have another #2 on June's sale list. Even after this I wouldn't hesitate to buy from him again.

So the saga with the #2 ends here. No more trying to bring this back to user status. I also lost out on the 5 1/2. I got an email today from Jim Bode saying that he can't find the plane so he gave me a refund. He has another 5 1/2 but he says it has damaged stamped on it. I thought about getting it but I don't want to take a chance on it. So the hunt continues for a #2, #5 1/2, and a #10.

still not done
I still can't bring myself to put plastic hands on this. I didn't spend much time in the shop tonight so I thought I would do this. It didn't happen again tonight. I looked at it for a few and said no again.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
How much does the Oscar statuette weigh?
answer - 8 1/2 pounds

Introducing the Crucible Design Curves

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 05/08/2017 - 3:57pm

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While a compass and straightedge can design simple pieces of furniture, you also need curves that have a varying radius to draw smooth shapes that connect three or four points – the accelerating curves that give motion and life to furniture.

The tools for these important curves are commonly called French curves or Burmester curves. And they are the starting (and ending) point for any designer who wants to escape rigid rectilinear shapes and simple circles.

While you can buy inexpensive plastic curves at an art supply store, the plastic tools have disadvantages compared to traditional wooden curves.

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Most plastic curves have a small rabbets along their edges. While we understand the function of the rabbet, we think it interferes with making a true and smooth line because you can tilt your pencil or pen. Traditional wooden curves have no rabbet, allowing greater accuracy.

Second, plastic curves are difficult to mark notations on, such as where you want a curve to start and stop. You can mark them with a permanent marker, but this is slow, inaccurate (in our experience) and messy. Plus, smooth plastic curves slide too easily on the paper while making your mark, again, spoiling your accuracy.

Traditional wooden curves, which are difficult to come by on the used market, are a joy to use. Warm in the hand, they are precise, they stick to the paper while you are drafting and it’s easy to write (and erase) notations on their surfaces.

The problem with traditional wooden curves is they were not truly dimensionally stable as they were typically made from solid hardwood. They were also fragile.

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The Crucible Design Curves
When we set out to design our curves we wanted them to be strong and stable (like plastic curves) but warm, accurate and easy to use (like wooden curves). The solution was a special five-ply bamboo material specially designed for laser-cutting.

We designed our curves using an English set made in 1943 as our foundation and inspiration. The curves are cut and engraved in Covington, Ky., then sanded to #220-grit in our shop in Fort Mitchell, Ky.

Bamboo is the perfect material for this tool. It is more dimensionally stable than any hardwood or softwood that we know of, it doesn’t absorb moisture as readily as wood and the five plies of veneer ensure it will stay the same shape year round.

Like plastic curves, these will bend readily across curved shapes without breaking.

Our first set of curves consists of three of our favorite shapes. The large curve is about 12″ long. The smaller two are about 6″ long. A full set of curves encompassed many individual tools. And while we hope to bring out more curves in the future, we think these three are an excellent starting point.

We are introducing these curves at Handworks 2017 where we will sell a set of three for the introductory price of $37. After Handworks they will be available in our online store. We might have to increase the price slightly for shipping and packaging costs charged by our warehouse.

Please stop by our booth at Handworks and give them a try. We’ll have a huge pile of them to sell in protective boxes suitable for travel.

— Christopher Schwarz

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Filed under: Crucible Tool, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Aldi Drill-driver Under Test

Paul Sellers - Mon, 05/08/2017 - 9:59am

You don’t see me too often extolling the merits of power equipment but one piece of equipment i use enough in the day to day of life is a battery-driven drill-driver. I like them because they are a one hand operation, leaving my free hand to hold the work. It doesn’t mean I  am abandoning …

Read the full post Aldi Drill-driver Under Test on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Meet the ‘Jimmy Possum’ Chair

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Mon, 05/08/2017 - 5:47am

I’ve long been fascinated by legends involving old chairmakers. Here in Kentucky we had Chester Cornett, an enigmatic bearded maker of the wildest ladderbacks and rockers I’ve seen. In Indiana we had a chairmaker in the southern part of the state who in the early 20th century made ladderbacks with a woven seat that look incredibly modern. In Australia, they have the “Jimmy Possum” chair. Reader Bradley van Luyt sent […]

The post Meet the ‘Jimmy Possum’ Chair appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

@ Handworks 2017 – Original Roubo Print #261

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 05/08/2017 - 4:48am

Throughout L’art du Menuisier Roubo illustrates some pretty snazzy furniture.  Print 261, “Plans and Elevations of a Closed Desk,” certainly fits that description.  If I recall the accompanying text correctly, this desk is designed for the use of four (or maybe even six) people. All of them sitting side by side in an un-air conditioned Parisian office (it is worth noting that the word “bureaucracy” is a French word) scratching out stacks of paperwork ad nauseam and ad infinitum.  Ahh, cubicle life at its very best.

The print is in excellent condition, and was both drawn and the copper plate engraved by Roubo himself.

If you have ever wanted to own a genuine piece of Rouboiana, this is your chance.   I will be selling this print at Handworks on a first-come basis, with terms being cash, check, or Paypal if you have a smart phone and can do that at the time of the transaction.

$250

Building Boxes at Haystack

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Mon, 05/08/2017 - 4:43am

Saturday’s ‘Build a Box’ workshop at Haystack was fun. If you haven’t been there, the campus is gorgeous in its tucked-away water-front location. The story goes that, back in the 60s, they chose this location based on its remoteness and solitude. They wanted to find a place where no highway would ever be built. I would say this little island off the coast of Maine was the perfect choice. Off the beaten path is an understatement.

 

I had a great variety of students: male and female, young and old. There were 10 students, most of whom had little no experience using hand tools. We started the day off discussing proportional design with dividers and then decided on dimensions for the boxes before breaking down the boards to length in teams. While everyone took turns sawing, I set up the school’s handplanes putting a slight camber on the irons.

 It was great to be able to hand each student a properly set up handplane from the first moment. With only minor instruction, everyone was making beautiful wispy shavings in the first few minutes. It wasn’t long before folks encountered the frustration of reversing grain and tear out. I coached each student through those tricky spots. This kind of experience always makes a big impression on people. To experience first-hand how the iron’s edge and the wood interact is worth more than reading all the books in the world.

 

After lunch, we moved to cutting the joinery. I demonstrated how to layout the rabbets on the front and back together so that they perfectly match. We gauged the rabbets’ depth, scribed the shoulders with a knife, used a chisel to create a V-groove for the saw to rest in, and sawed the shoulder to the gauge lines. To remove the waste, I taught them how to split it off with the chisel and pare to the line. They were pretty impressed with how easy that was!

 

By the end of this crash-course day most everyone had their boxes assembled and some had their bottoms installed. Although we didn’t complete the boxes, I accomplished my goal of introducing everyone to hand tools by diving right in. Considering the limited time, I was proud of everyone. It was amazing to see piles of shavings at everyone’s feet.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

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