Hand Tool Headlines

The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

 

Be sure to visit the Hand Tool Headlines section - scores of my favorite woodworking blogs in one place.  Also, take note of Norse Woodsmith's latest feature, an Online Store, which contains only products I personally recommend.  It is secure and safe, and is powered by Amazon.

Search

Hand Tools

A Stay-set # 3 Record Bench Plane

Paul Sellers - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 2:42am

It’s quite a lovely plane really. Compact and lightweight, feisty in the hand and then dead gutsy. That’s howI feel about all of the #3s really. I love plucking them from my tools from time to time and seeing them flip, turn and twist to task so willingly and immediately in my hands as I […]

Read the full post A Stay-set # 3 Record Bench Plane on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

lots of nothing......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 1:11am
I sure felt like I should have had more to show for tonight than what I thought I did. I was expecting a few toys to be waiting for me but I only had one show up. I still haven't heard from Bob about my saw being ready to come back to me. I wasted my lunch time trying to find the proper name of the "A" plumb bob thing I am making with no luck. I thought I would have found something because it was used to make the pyramids in ancient Egypt. So it has a bit of age not to mention history. And I'm still waiting on my book from LAP to come in. I'm starting to get a wee bit nervous that the USPS might have given my book to someone else.

I'm adding to my whining above a lack of sleep. I don't know why but I woke up this morning a few tics after double balls (midnight - 0000) and I could not get back to sleep. After tossing and flopping like fish out of water, I finally got up at 0300. I remember having a dream before I woke where I was using my "A" plumb bob thing to build a log cabin and my shoes started to unravel at the seams. That is when I woke up. Maybe I'll finish the dream tonight and find out why my shoes unraveled.

new strops cut out
All 3 of them are tad over three inches wide. The far left one is 11 1/4" long and the other two are an inch longer. I am going to weigh them down with a plane for few days to flatten the roll in them. Then I'll glue them to a substrate, probably 3/4" plywood.

big square came in
This is bigger than I envisioned it being. I was going to stop with this and forgo getting a 12" one but I may have to adjust that thinking. This is a big ass square.

17" on the outside
15" on the inside
happy face on - it's square on the inside

square on the outside
The outside edge of the wooden handle is rounded. The inside edge is square and faced with a brass plate. That doesn't explain why the outside edge isn't square too. It doesn't appear to be something the previous owner did but maybe came this way? It is a slight round and not pronounced at all.

ear to ear smile now
This is my Chappell square (18" model) and it says it is dead nuts on the inside.


square on the outside
In spite of the rounded edge, I had no problems feeling and getting the framing square aligned on the 15" square.

I like the size and capability of this square
I had looked for some one still making a 15" square and a company in England still does. At that time it was almost $200 to get it here across the pond. I didn't get it because there were 10 negative comments on it for every positive one. That is why I bought the Chappel square instead. After only a few minutes playing with this, I may have a hard time giving it to Miles.

It won't fit in the bottom
fits in the big till
I am not a fan of having a square flopping around in a till. I like having them secured and protected from getting banged by other tools. For the time being I'll keep it in here but it won't be staying here long term.

lots of room
I made the half laps a bit longer because I knew I would be sawing these off.

cleaning up "A"
legs are still off

measured, marked, and sawed off the longer leg again
still a 1/4" off
The left leg is 4 7/8" and the right one is 4 3/4".

I think I'm chasing tail
I planed the right leg flat to match the line on the dog block and I'm still off. Before I go off into La La Land, I'm going to have to think a bit about this.  The top angle for the legs being off is really screwing around with my brain bucket. I don't have the plumb bob yet so I'll set this aside for now.

doesn't look like the middle
This is similar to finding the center by drawing the diagonals on a square and I wasn't sure if it would work on this angle. I measured the 'center point' in four cardinal directions and they were all the same. Visually it doesn't look to be the center but the measurements tell me it is.

rough handle has had a chance to set up
I don't like it
It too big, sits too tall, and it looks like total crappola to my eye. The arch on the bottom isn't even and one leg (left) leans outboard slightly. The scale is off but I do like the color contrast between the walnut and the mahogany. But that is not enough to get me to use it - it's burnt toast.
I'm going knob and handle free
I'm not going to use the feet on this neither. I'll sand this and put on some shellac and call it done.

planed the twist out
Checking with the sticks on the half way point to both ends.

why not
No twist on the edges too.

I planed out the hump
I shut the lights out and headed upstairs. I won't work in the shop if I start to yawn.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is phobophobia?
answer - a fear of phobias

Plane talk

Oregon Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 5:35pm
I have written about my frustration with not being able to use planes on the douglas-fir slab because of all the tearout.  Douglas-fir tears out fairly easily anyway and all the wild grain and knots just made things impossible, at least that's what I thought.

I had one more piece of the slab I used to make the dining room table, the only one with no knots and  I was determined to get to the bottom of this issue.  I began by using the power hand plane to get the rough surface down to within about 1/16" of flat.  I didn't use a scrub plane because the last time I tried it tore out something fierce, 1/8" in places.

What I tried first was taking a sharp #3 set to take very shallow cuts.  I used it across and on both diagonals to the grain and it worked really well:


I also gingerly tried it with the grain but it started to tearout, so I stopped.  I was still puzzled about why this has been so difficult.  I have flattened my bench, which is cvg fir, with minimal tearout and successfully made other things out of fir.

I decided to do some research and essentially found what I have read previously except in a more extreme form.  Several experts recommend setting the chipbreaker absolutely as close to the edge as you can possibly get it when planing difficult wood, literally a few thousandths.  The reasoning is precisely that it breaks the chips before they can tearout, producing accordion like shavings and only a slightly rougher surface.  Neither put emphasis on a tight mouth.  One suggested a bevel-up plane with a blade sharpened at a very steep angle as an alternative, something I have.  The blade becomes its own chipbreaker.  Being risk averse, I decided to give both of these a try with the grain on the bottom of the slab.  In both cases, I sharpened the blades carefully before beginning.

As you can see from this picture of the sidegrain, it isn't difficult to predict where it would tearout.


With the #3 freshly sharpened and the chipbreaker set as close as I could get it, I tried planing with the grain.  Nothing happened.  Taking the plane apart, I discovered why.


There wedged between the plane and the chipbreaker were the accordion shaped shavings.  Not hard to figure this out.  I purchased this plane a while back, sharpened it, tried it, and it worked fine, so that's all I did.  Visual inspection of the front of the chipbreaker attached to the blade looked just fine, but it clearly wasn't when the chipbreaker was set this close.  There was enough of a gap that the chips could force their way in.  The fact that I use the ruler trick on my plane blades may have been a contributing factor, I don't know.  After I cleaned up  and shaped the chipbreaker, the plane started producing nice accordion shavings with no tearout, just a slight roughness in places.  This is what the shavings looked like.


As you can see, they are somewhat short because they tend to break off.  Next, I decided to try my Lee Valley bevel-up smoother with a 50 degree blade.  In this case, the blade acts as its own chipbreaker because the angle of attack is 62 degrees.  It too produced shavings without tearout, but they were distinctly different, not accordion-shaped and more continuous, leaving a surface that was slightly smoother. 


The major difference between these two planes was that the bevel-up plane was noticeably harder to push.

That left the issue of why I had experienced such bad tearout with old #7.  I removed the Hock blade and chipbreaker to look at them and this is what I saw:


The chipbreaker was set fully 1/16" back from the edge.  Sharpening the blade and moving the chipbreaker up to the very edge of the blade gave me long continuous shavings with very slight tearout, easily removed with a cabinet scraper.


You can see what a tight roll the chipbreaker being set up like this produces.  I think the reason it isn't accordion shaped is that the Hock chipbreaker is at a lower angle than the stock Stanley one.  The front of it has the same shape as the blade and is about the same thickness.  It's like a second blade turned over and with a slight bow in it.

What are the takeaways?  First, I don't know why I have to continually relearn this lesson, but when something isn't going well it pays to stop and figure out why rather than just blundering ahead. 

More significantly to readers of this blog who are hopefully not beset with this failing, the advice to set the chipbreaker absolutely as close to the edge as you can get it when planing difficult wood is confirmed.  You don't want to do this normally, because the resulting accordion shavings are not continuous and leave a somewhat rougher finish.

Finally, I think Lee Valley's claim that the low angle smoother with a 50 degree blade will do a good job on difficult grain is also confirmed. 
Categories: Hand Tools

A small barn for the summer house 13, internal boards.

Mulesaw - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 2:12pm
I have been making some progress on the internal boards for the small barn.
Those were the boards that I had to shift inside as I was called to work a week earlier than anticipated.
So the first task was to shift all of them out again. I decided that I could work around the table that was inside, but I still needed to move the chairs and a bit of other stuff outside before starting the actual work.

The boards are the same type as those that were put on the sub roof. It is not a typical type of boards to use for internal paneling/boards, but it is of a much better quality than the regular type used. In Denmark the usual boards to be used would be something called "rustic boards". They are made out of the surplus Christmas trees that grew to fast so they were too large to sell. The distance between the growth rings is typical 3/8" or thereabouts, so the wood is of an exceptionally poor quality. The shape is like a tongue and groove board with the tongue something like 1/2" too long. So once the boards are mounted, there is a trench between each board. They are available in various widths and either nature, or artificially whitened, smooth or rough sawn.
But that aside - I chose the other type because I think they look better in a classic barn, and they were actually cheaper per square meter (or square foot if you like).

I mount the boards using regular nails. I know that a pneumatic nail gun is faster, but I actually like to hammer in nails, so I go for the slow and old fashioned way.

Once all the boards are mounted, I plan on putting some strips of wood in the corners and around the window sills, to cover the gaps.


Internal boards mounted.

The "famous" stack..



Categories: Hand Tools

Video: Hi Vise Build

Benchcrafted - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:26pm


Watch Guy Dunlap build our Hi Vise in this excellent video from our friends at Highland Woodworking.

Hi Vises are in stock and ready to ship.
Categories: Hand Tools

Dugout Chair: Fastening the Seat

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 12:44pm

Every step of making this dugout chair has been a little weird. Fastening its seat in place was no different. After cutting the seat to shape using using the help of ticking sticks, I rasped the rim of the seat until I could wedge it inside the trunk and get it level. I usually use a 6” spirit level for this task, but I left it at home. So I […]

The post Dugout Chair: Fastening the Seat appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Hand Planes

Northwest Woodworking - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 10:44am

Some folks think of hand planes as artifacts. Some consider them cute antiques. Others have the best of intentions to use them on a project some day.

I consider my hand planes to be time savers. They cut out sanding chores, they shave impossibly thin shavings so I can fit joints together perfectly, they smooth and flatten. I would be lost without my kit of hand planes. Their roles in the shop has increased even as my number of machines have. They can do chores that machines cannot.

Saturday we host another workshop at the Studio on Handplanes: Tuning and Using. Join us for the quiet satisfaction of tuning and then using a hand plane. Can’t beat it.

 

 

1-Bedrock plane-002


Categories: Hand Tools

Perch Stool Part 2: Legging Up

The Renaissance Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 6:44am

I Laugh in the Face of Tapered Compound Angled Mortises

The process of boring the tapered mortises for the legs is a lot simpler once you just do it. You will hear lots of talk about rake and splay angles and resultant angles and sight lines. Some internet searching will yield any number of results on how to bore the angles using mirrors and lasers and by standing on one leg after 3PM on a Tuesday. The way I was taught during my first Windsor chair was much less angles and precision, and mostly eyeball and feeling my way through it. Even today with so much great instruction on the subject that didn’t exist 10 years ago I still find Windsor construction to be a very organic and forgiving style of construction.

I say all of this to urge you to suspend the questions for a minute and just bore some holes. Using the seat pattern that Peter Galbert so helpfully provided we know the location of the sight lines, the location of the holes, and the resultant angles. So grab a bevel gauge and an auger bit and go to it. Remember that the reamer can correct a lot of disparity that may result while you bore your holes.

Reaming Tip Not Covered in the Video

I neglected to talk about this in the video and frankly I got lucky when my workbench intervened and stopped my reamer from going any deeper. Remember that while you are reaming that you do want to maintain the diameter of the hole on top of the seat. The tenons have been rounded down to a minimum diameter of 1/2″
but if you keep pushing the reamer will widen the hole all the way through and you will have to drive your legs in so far that you will shorten the legs unnecessarily. So keep an eye on the depth of the reamer and if appropriate but a stop block underneath your seat to ensure you don’t widen the holes on the top of the seat too much.

Next Live Broadcast

12 PM on Saturday 11/4/17

I carve the seat so that it delicately cradles my posterior

Octagonal Legs?

Don’t want turned legs? How about tapered octagonal legs often found in Welsh Stick Chairs?
Categories: Hand Tools

yo-yo weather.........

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:17am
The weather has been a little screwy lately. It has been unseasonably warm but one day last week had dipped down into the 40's overnight. We also had one day where it rained all day like a cow letting go on a flat rock. That day sucked because I got soaked going into work. We still haven't had the first frost of the year and tonight it is forecasted to rain again with high winds > 50MPH. Not that I'm complaining because everyday that is warm is one less day I have to pay for heat.

quiet time work
I worked on fitting the lid and cleared most of the other crappola off the bench.

two strops?
I am going to make at least two strops out this. One more for me that is longer than the ones I have now and one for Miles. The strops I have now are about 8" long and 3" wide. I think the width is ok but the length is too short. I can get 3 strops from this piece of leather each one 3" wide by 12" long.

walnut banding is solid
The glue appears to be ok with holding the walnut. There aren't any gaps anywhere that I can see. I am not depending upon the walnut to hold the lid on. The banding is to hide the strips I glued on the bottom of the lid.

very snug fit
The lid goes on this way and won't fit when I flip it 180. It probably would if I thumped it but I didn't want to chance popping the banding off.

marked the connection
I marked the lid  and bottom for the best fit before I glued the walnut on. It fits this way but not 180.

chisel action
I used the chisel as a scraper and went around the inside of the lid. I concentrated on getting any glue residue off first and checked the fit. It fit on the numbers and when I flipped it 180. It was a wee bit snug, but it fit.

tight on the left and some daylight on the right
I scraped the inside of the walnut until I saw daylight all around. I then sanded the top outside rim of the box with 120 grit. That did two things for me - first it loosened the fit of the walnut and it closed up the toes on the miters. I finally got the lid to fit both ways, equally well.

rounded over the lid banding
I sanded this corner again. The toes of the miter are closed at the top and open at the middle. I sanded coming from both sides until the miter closed up.

rounded over the top of the lid
Made a decision regarding this box. Taking the lid off is too much to do one handed. It is too wide to easily and comfortably be removed one handed. It needs a knob or a handle to do that. I won't be using this box to keep the 140 in. I'll have to make a 3rd 140 box.

first knob choice
Don't like it and I won't be using it. I thought of making a base or a pad for it but I don't think even that will help this look.

3 more knob choices
The metal knobs are toast but the ring pull I kind of like. I think that would look ok with a base for it. I think a base is needed to beef this up because the lid is only a piece of 1/8" plywood. Without a base behind any kind of a knob or handle, the lid might flex.

found some feet
I had forgotten that I had these. Since it isn't going to be the 140 box anymore, I'll use them on this. I can give this as a xmas present with a gift certificate in it. Or stuffed with some of my daughter's favorite candy.

going to make a walnut handle
flushed
Worked on flushing this while I thought of what I wanted to make for a handle.

#8 hollow
I squared up the walnut stick and used the #8 to knock off the corners. I wasn't trying to make it round but just come up with a shape that was inbetween round and square.


fixing the Disston 6" square
I didn't like the look of the walnut handle so I worked on this square while I thought of something else. The light area on the bottom square isn't daylight. It is what I filed to bring the inside of it square. The outside was dead nuts and didn't need any help.

done
It took a few extra cha-cha dance steps but it is square now. I did 3 checks for square. The first was with the 6" engineer's square, second was drawing double lines on the plywood, and third was checking the square edge on the plywood. All three passed and I did one more final check with the 6" engineer's square. I have a 15" square coming and I should have that next week. That will complete it for these style of squares for Miles's toolbox. I still want to get a 4" sliding square and I might have to bite the bullet and buy a Starrett.

half laps on the legs done
Now that the leg half laps were done, I flipped this over and marked the brace for it's half laps.

feet leveling
Because I planed one shoulder on one leg more than the other, the angle between the legs changed. I sawed the legs at the original bevel angle but since the legs aren't even, the horizontal brace isn't parallel to them neither. Once the glue has set on the brace, I'll saw and plane flush the overhanging parts. The ugly looking gap will be history come tomorrow.

I had to plane one leg square, the other one was sawn square
here you can see the tilt in it
According to what I read, this won't effect the reading you get. You take one reading this way and mark where the plumb bob hangs, flip it 180 and repeat. The plumb will be between the two lines. You just have to look at where the plumb bob is hanging in relation to your plumb line to see which side is high/low.

I wanted parallel
I drew a line on the bench and put the legs on it and adjusted it until the brace measured the same from that line to the brace on the outside of both legs. Once I had that I marked the legs and sawed them off. I didn't go nutso on this, I was shooting for an eyeball close look and I got that.

had to make a pit stop
I dropped this off the bench right on the point. This is the backside of the knife after I restored it. I still had a bit more to go but I was very surprised by how easily I did it. This was my first experience sharpening a japanese anything.

got my point back
I tried it out and it felt as sharp as when I first got it.

decided to sharpen the iron on my new blockplane
This iron has been hand sharpened and it is out of square. I can tell it is has been sharpened by hand because the bevel is rounded and it is also uneven. First batter is grinding a new bevel and squaring it.

10 strokes on the 80 grit runway
The stripe down by the heel is what I just did. I have a long ways to go before I get to the toe.

got a hump
I wasn't going to do the back because it looked like it had been done already. Took me about 20 minutes to get rid of it.

adjuster knobs
The one in my fingers is the LN knob and the one in the back is a replacement one. It has a bearing where the ring is on the LN one. That makes for zero backlash and a silky smooth adjustment on moving the iron in or out. It is made by an  Australian  and he makes them for the LN 102 and 103 small block planes too. I am going to get one for the LN 60 1/2 and for the 102.

done
Silky smooth, effortlessly made wispy shavings. This is a good addition to the herd and it will get well used by me. I had started lapping and cleaning up the cheeks and sole by stopped. There is some pitting on the right cheek and the sole that wasn't lapping out with 220. I didn't feel like starting with 80 and working up. For now it has been done with 220 and 320 followed by some Autosol. I will do it eventually because I don't like seeing the pits. But for now she is ready to go back to work.

I'll keep it in here for now
Until I get around to rearranging the plane storage under my bench, this will have to live here for now.

replacements for the hasp
The left one isn't brass but a shiny white metal color. If it was brass I wouldn't be putting the black one on.

done
I like this but I am not in love with the cheap look and feel of it. It works well for lifting the lid and the curl is below the top so it won't interfere with crap being piled on the lid. But I will be looking for a replacement that isn't a stamped, cheap piece of crappola like this.


Update: Found a solid brass one from House of Antique Hardware and I almost skipped on it. S/H was $3 less than the sash lift.

the back for the plumbline stick
There is a teeny bit of twist on the far end that I'll have to remove. The author said that this should be twist free. I'll do that tomorrow because I fell off the wagon with taking my arthritis  pills again. My fingers are aching on my right hand and this is a good place to stop. I'll get the stick done tomorrow.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia?
answer - a fear of the number 666

The Melbourne Fair 2017

Pegs and 'Tails - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:33pm
The Melbourne Fair Antique, 20th Century, Art Deco, Vintage 23rd to 26th November Caulfield Racecourse Indoor Concourse Space Gate 23, Station Street Caulfield East, Victoria Opening Night 23rd November 6-9pm, 24th November 11am-6pm, 25th November 10am-6pm, 26th November 10am-5pm If … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Additional Tip Shapes for Dividers

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 4:56pm

final_divider_IMG_9194

We’ve just posted a new video at Crucible Tool’s blog on how to create two additional (and useful) tip shapes for your dividers. One tip is designed specifically for scribing arcs. The other is for cutting inlay or recesses.

While we show these tips on our Improved Pattern Dividers, they can be created on any pair of dividers.

Also in the short video, Raney demonstrates a down-and-dirty way to harden and temper the tips with a torch.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Crucible Tool, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

The Acanthus is Coming

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 9:19am

diestamp_test_IMG_9541

Our printing plant is in the final stages of work on “Carving the Acanthus Leaf” by Mary May. And, as always, our books are a creative struggle to the end.

This week we’ve been working on the “diestamp,” the debossed image on the inside of the dust jacket. We take great pains with our diestamps because they will live on longer than our dustjackets. (If you want to see my favorite diestamp, check out the one for “Calvin Cobb – Radio Woodworker!” and see if you can figure out the Easter egg.)

Diestamps are old technology. And though many printing plants can produce amazing covers with holograms, laser cutouts and unusual leather finishes, getting a diestamp with fine detail is a struggle. Almost every time I send our diestamp to the nice people at our prepress service, I am sure they smack their collective foreheads.

Their response is usually: I don’t think we can hold that level of detail without the image blurring.

To their credit, they are willing to try different approaches. Lately, we’ve been using a stamp made from magnesium and some different foils to see if we can achieve the fine lines shown in the samples above. In this case, we found the correct combination of a magnesium die and a cream foil that gave us the effect we’re looking for.

With the diestamp complete, our job is over. It’s up to the printing plant to bring all the different parts – the book block, boards, endsheets, cover cloth and dustjacket – together to complete the book. We haven’t been told when the book will ship, but history suggests it will be in within the next three weeks.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Carve the Acanthus with Mary May, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

What Furniture Tells

360 WoodWorking - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:04am
What Furniture Tells

Many woodworkers who focus attention on period reproductions “read” the images in books and pieces in museums to discover to what furniture tells them. Designs sometimes clue them in as to what period of furniture history the pieces were built. (It’s not always clear-cut because no furniture periods ended exactly on a Tuesday with a new period beginning on Wednesday.) It’s possible to learn in what area of the country pieces were built if they read the materials used in construction.

Continue reading What Furniture Tells at 360 WoodWorking.

Issue III release date notice

Journeyman's Journal - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:03am

handwork_issue3_Page_01

Finally it’s finished, all the articles completed, edited over and over again. This was a big project for me as the moulding planes article was a toughie to write about.  I needed to provide enough description without putting you to sleep and make it easy enough to follow.  I think I have accomplished both and I believe you will be able to make any h&r using a simpler method than the traditional British and American approach.  I have covered many aspects of the build and the reasoning behind the numbering system.

I’m sorry it took so long, but I think you will agree it was worth the wait.

As you can see I’ve also made some minor changes. Hope you like it.

As always I would like to thank Matt McGrane our magazine’s contributing editor. I would be lost without him.

Issue III release date is on Saturday 4th November 2017.

Yes, it is free


Categories: Hand Tools

saturday doldrums.....

Accidental Woodworker - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 3:12am
It seems I've fallen into a rut on getting my butt into the shop on saturdays. I'm sucking up OT on saturday mornings at least for the next couple of months. I will have Lowes paid off by the first payday in November. After that I will start feeding the workbench build kitty again and whatever is left will go to heating the house. And I can't forget that xmas is less than two months away.

But getting back to the rut I seem to have fallen into with saturday shop days. Maybe I should just go with the flow on this and just accept getting to the shop after lunch isn't too bad. I can be a wee bit nutso and OCD rolled together with this being on a time schedule. Coming home and vegging after OT and hitting the shop after lunch isn't going to stop the sun from rising or setting. Once got to the shop and started working on the walnut banding on the lid, the juices started to warm up and I started a left field project.

mitering the lid
The quick way of doing this would be to make butt joints at the corners. To me that would look like crap so I'm mitering the corners. I've settled into a way of doing them that I like and also yields good results. Before I started doing my mitering this way I usually always ended up with the last miter being open.

Now I start by clamping one piece in place. The fit on that side doesn't matter. This first piece is only used to set and mark the second one.

first piece
I fuss with this until I get the heel of the miter dead nuts on the corner. I clamp it and make sure it didn't move and that it can't move.

my setting line
This pencil is the top of the banding. I will set the walnut so that I cover this when I glue them in place.

marking the first piece to be glued down
I hold the right end up tight against the first piece and mark the left end. Rough saw it and then use the donkey ear jig to shave it to the knife line.

I'll shave this until the knife line is barely visible.
I'm going to try this glue
This glue sets up in about 30 minutes and the final cure is 24 hours later. I haven't tried using it for anything other then gluing chips and blowouts back down. If it doesn't work, I'll remove the walnut and try something else.

two sides glued on
I have to wait at least 30 minutes for this to set up so I can put on the last two.

one of my left field projects
I got this bug up my butt from this guy on Saw Mill Creek. I've been following him and these gizmos got a hold of my limited attention span. I have seen the one above that he has in this 3rd post being used but at the time I had no idea of what it's purpose or use was.  I don't know what I'll use it for or that I even have a need for it. But that has never stopped me before with making something. I have piece of 5/4 pine that I'm using to make it.

I got the back long piece cut out and I had to stop. The workbench is being use to do the lid so I couldn't plane and work the 5/4 stock. I'll pick this one back up tomorrow.

it's been an hour
I got the final two pieces on without any hiccups and I'll let it set up until tomorrow.

gizmo #2
I did a bit of reading on this and I was surprised about how accurate it really is. The construction of it doesn't matter. The joints don't have to be dead nuts because of the principle of the plumb bob. The legs don't have to be the same length neither. You just have to split the difference with the plumb bob reading taken from both sides.

I already bought a plumb bob that looks a lot like the one in my drawing. It is very difficult to find one of these that don't cost a boatload of dollars. Since plumb bobs were replaced with lasers and other electronic gadgets they have become collectibles.

a scrap of pine saw in two for the legs
a piece of pine from this board will be the horizontal leg
eyeballed an angle
I used the dividers to find the half way point on the width. I set my marking gauge to that. It is these dividers that I want to get for Miles. I like and prefer the round leg vs the square ones.

the more I use this saw, the more I'm liking it
I sawed the shoulders and cheeks with this saw. I did better and felt more in control of it than with the thin plate LN saws. I was able to saw closer and truer to my lines too.

didn't have much to true up
less than one frog hair proud
ubiquitous blurry pic
I marked both sides off each piece and I don't understand how I am off this much. The only thing I can think of is that I sawed on the wrong side of the top knife line. But I would have had to have done that on both of them. This is too much to leave as is and too much to plane flush.

tenon plane to the rescue
I planed the shoulders on both legs, taking more off of this one. This leg seemed to be a bit shorter than the other.

closed it up a lot
This I will plane out flush once it is done.

ancient tools deserve to be glued with an ancient glue
that is a good joint line

did just as well on this side too
last strip glued on
I only glued on one strip before and started to work on the 2nd plumb bob tool. That one was glued and setting up so I finished this. Over 30 minutes had gone by so I didn't have to worry about the last piece I glued moving on me.

a hasp or a handle
Since I put the dust shield banding on this toolbox, it is not easy to open. It needs something to help with lifting the lid. I thought of putting on a handle but I think the hasp is going to be the winner. My first choice was a snap catch but the dust shield banding isn't wide enough to fit one of them here.

it fits
I am not going to lock this. The hasp is just to help lifting the lid more easily. I think a handle would look out of place but this will look like it belongs. I'm still undecided about this and I have plenty of time to make my mind up on it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What do the letters in CAPTCHA stand for?
answer - completely automated public truing test to tell computers and humans apart

Significant Piece of Kentucky Furniture Shatters Records

Pegs and 'Tails - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 10:28pm
The most significant piece of Kentucky furniture to ever come to market shattered the record for furniture made in the Bluegrass State when it sold for $498,750 at Cowan’s Auctions on Saturday, October 21. Captain John Cowan’s “desk and bookcase”, … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Sawbench for dowel plates

Mulesaw - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 1:31pm
I had a plan for what I would like to build this time at home, but somehow a non-scheduled project has found it way into the workshop.

Actually it is a project that I have considered for some time: A new sawbench.
I made a sawbench something like 8 years ago, and it is one of the most used pieces of equipment I have in the shop. A thing that I have thought would be useful was if I could use a sawbench for my dowel plates. That way I didn't have to mess around on the top of the workbench, to make sure that a hole for one of the dogs was straight below the hole in the dowel plate.
Also the stretchers for the legs would be a perfect little test subject for my new chain mortiser. And with Asger and Gustav in the shop, I didn't have any room for building the staircase which meant that it was perfectly OK in my mind to start another project.

The first bench I made was made exactly to the measurements outlined in Woodworking Magazine.
This time I decided that it might not cause the world economy to collapse, if I decided to make a few alterations to the design.
So I made the top thicker, wider and a little bit longer than on the original. I stayed with the same height, and also the same angle of splay on the legs.
This time I used larch for legs and stretchers, and a piece of Sitka spruce for the top that I milled long time ago.

The tenons of the stretchers are drawbored and wedged. The top is secured with dowels that I tried to drawbore as well. I did that so that the dowels will hold the top to close to the notch in the top of the legs.
Below the top there are a couple of reinforcements glued and screwed to the legs.

I used a chisel and a router plane to make a recess for the dowel plates. I chose not to make it the same depth as the plates, because it is easier to remove the plates when there is a bit protruding through the top like it is now.
A small piece of elm was cut and planed to fit into the recess while not in use for the dowel plates.


Asger working on a gambrel roofed church.

Hot glue gun, strips of wood and some imagination is all it takes.

Glue up.

Making a recess.

Elm insert.

Blum dowel plate.

Categories: Hand Tools

Pedder bei Klaus

Old Ladies - Pedder's blog - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 12:44pm
Klaus und ich haben seit langer Zeit mal wieder ein Wochenende zusammen zum Sägenbauen und Austausch. Ich lerne viel, was ich  künftig viel selber können will (und muss).

Klaus and I are sprending a workshop weekend. I learn a lot I want (and need) to do myself.   
So sehen die Ebenhölzer nach seiner Spezialbehandlung aus. Die matte Oberfläche gefällt mir so gut, das verlangt nach Experimenten.

Eony after Klau' special treatments. I like the dul look of this stage. Calls for experiments.
Anzeichnen mit weißem Lack.
Marking with with color.
Hausaufgaben. Die Dekupiersäge steht schon länger bei mir. Und diese Schnitte gehen mit Der Badsäge nicht wirklich.

Homework for me. The electrical coping saw is in my shop rather long an this is no work for the bandsaw.

Späne vom Dickenhobeln.
Shavings from thicknessing - with a #6

Späne vom Bohren.
Drill shavings.
Categories: Hand Tools

lid fitted........

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 12:47am
The folding caliper rule I ordered from Hyperkitten was waiting for me when I got home. A nice 6' clean and functional specimen that doesn't look like it was used much. No dings, the leaves all opened and closed freely, and all the numbers and divisions are still clear and crisp looking.  I definitely think it was worth the $15 I paid for it.


got surprise here - Miles's ruler is on top and mine is on the bottom
I would have bet a lung that I owned a Stanley folding caliper rule. Not only do I own a Lufkin, it is a #46 just like the one I got for Miles.  Although they are the same model # there are a few differences between them. I have some extra markings that the top one doesn't have. Or I could have a #46 that is an  older model. One big difference is my numbers are slightly larger.

another difference in the size (width)
I'm going to go out on a limb and say that my Lufkin is the older one. I'm basing that on bigger numbers, more Lufkin ID stuff between the numbers 1 to 6, and my rule appears to have bigger metal pieces for the folding leaves. Manufacturers usually dumb down to save money. Anyways, Miles still has a decent folding caliper rule for his toolbox.

some screwdrivers for Miles
I am going to soldier on with the two sets I have and give this one to him. I will add a #1 and a #2 square drive to complete this. Most of the screws I use are square drive and I want Miles to have the capability to use them too.

lid fitted
I left the fit a bit on the snug side because I still have to even out the rim and round over the top of the banding.

cocked upwards on the right
flipped the lid 180 and still higher on the right
The important thing is it fits and it fits when the lid is flipped 180. Now I have to figure out why the lid  is higher on the right.

I don't think it's the lid
If the lid was the culprit I would have expected the lid cocking to switch when I flipped the lid 180. But with the lid flipped, the high end stayed on the right.

right end of the banding is higher than the left
my lowest spot
The left corner is the lowest spot on the banding so I'll straighten out the banding to this point.

done
I planed the high corners first and when I eyeballed them close to the low spot, I started to flush all around.

little bit of a gap on the right
This isn't too big of a worry for me. This will be covered with the walnut banding and never be seen. I am more concerned with it being level and even at this point.

lid flipped 180
It still fits but I didn't make the gap go away.

four sides and lid planed and cleaned up
flushed the top and bottom
After I get the walnut banding on the lid done, I can start putting the shellac on.

trying out my miter guide
This worked ok. No problems with the left one but the right one makes a slanted miter. I knew that because the vertical part of the guide is not plumb.

slanted miter
I didn't leave enough to trim on the pieces I cut. I thought I add left an 1/8" but the length of the four parts is almost perfect.

beveled 3 sides
The  side without a bevel will be up against the right side of the box.

small detail
I think this looks better than just a plain rectangular block in the bottom. This will get screwed to the bottom of the box with no glue. This way I can repurpose this box if I decide to.

won't make it
3 of the miters have a slant to them. If I didn't have those slanted miters, I would have been able to use these. The slants leave the miters open and that makes it look like crap.

sawed and planed a backing strip for the miters
the original long strips
I can reuse these to make a new set of short ones for the ends.

my last two
I rooted around my small scrap box and found these two. I will use them to make two new long pieces. I'll make sure that I leave some meat for trimming and fitting.


I'll do the lid banding tomorrow
My wife has been in "I hate my job" mood all week. Just in case, I want to be ready to go out to eat when she gets home. So I shut off the lights here and headed upstairs.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What was the number of the last Apollo mission to the moon in 1972?
answer - Apollo 17

How To Set A Wooden Plane

The English Woodworker - Fri, 10/27/2017 - 11:01am
How To Set A Wooden Plane

Twat…
…nothing happens.

Twat….nothing happens.

Slightly harder twat…

…And the iron’s sticking half inch out of the sole of the plane.

Wooden planes look good.

They are good.

But they ain’t half got awkward sod written all over them.

Since hand tools became a thing again, folk have been really struggling with the setting of wooden planes.

Continue reading at The English Woodworker.

Categories: Hand Tools

Pages

Subscribe to Norse Woodsmith aggregator - Hand Tools