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Hand Tools

Last Chance for ‘Sharpen This’ Sticker

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:14pm

My daughter Maddy reports she has fewer than 50 sets of stickers left, a set that includes the “Sharpen This” sticker that is showing up on the boxes for sharpening stones everywhere. (Wish I had thought of that.)

If you want a set of these high-quality stickers, here are the details. You can order a set of three from her etsy store here. A set is $6 delivered ($10 for international orders).

Or, for customers in the United States, you can send a $5 bill and a SASE (self-addressed stamped envelope) to by daughter Maddy at:

Stick it to the Man
P.O. Box 3284
Columbus, OH 43210

As always, this is not a money-making venture for me or Lost Art Press. All profits help Maddy through college. (Only one more college payment due!)

After this set is exhausted, we’ll be printing three new stickers. I’m working on the new designs now.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

The Best Marking Knife

The English Woodworker - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 10:44am
The Best Marking Knife

All my tools are fairly rough and basic.

I’ve never had much bother finding tools that work, although two things have always troubled me.

The first; finding drill bits that don’t rag out the work in slow hand powered drills.

And finding a good marking knife.

The drill bit hunt is still on, but I have finally got on top of the iron dagger.

My favourite knife for many years was a bit of old hacksaw blade, sharpened to a spear like point, so it could be used right or left-handed.

Continue reading at The English Woodworker.

Categories: Hand Tools

M&T Shop Building: Installing Sheathing

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 9:45am

Because of a wind storm that knocked the power out this week (stalling progress on the Tables video edit), Mike and I have been working on sheathing the shop the past few days. We are just about finished with the first floor and we have one of the gable ends upstairs complete. This part of the project has been fun as we are able to work to carpentry tolerances rather than furniture tolerances.

This is no normal carpentry job, though. Choosing the right board for each spot has definitely made this a slower process because we’ve got all kinds of random lengths and widths (often tapering) to work with, not to mention the waney edges and ragged ends. We are also selecting the most attractive (and wide) boards for the more prominent areas in the shop. Needless to say, each board selection is the result of careful consideration of many factors before we do the custom shaping to fit the adjacent board.

We know we’ve still got a long way ahead of us until the shop is complete but each step is an exciting glimpse of it taking shape.

- Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

The Creative Streak

Northwest Woodworking - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 6:57am

Why do we make things? Why do we do this creative work?

A dear friend came by last night and looked at a kitchen table of mine made some decades ago. She saw the Cloud Rise curves shaped into the edge of its top. She noticed the Chinese foot at the base of the piece. She remarked on the table, admired its shapes, color, wood. These details were ones that I had put in to train myself at the bench. They made no difference to the integrity of the table. It stood still.

There are efforts we make that have nothing to do with structure, with longevity or use. They are done simply because they are important to me, the builder. They are important to how I feel when I’m done with the piece. That I have given it some character, some part of me as well. These painstaking details are done because they inform the piece. They are a gift of intention by its maker. “Here I hope you enjoy this.”

Nothing more. Done as much for me, the builder, as for the eventual viewer who will never know how many hours it took to create the details that her eyes glanced down to and admired in a few minutes of time. It is how it is.

The work was done for her but also for my own selfish needs to satisfy my simple creative urge. That streak of me-ness that will flash briefly and be seen little more.

Read more of my musings on creativity in my new book: Handmade, Creative Focus in the Age of Distraction.

An image of the first chunk of wood I made into a piece of crude furniture.

1-bench-end

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Live-Edge Slabs from NYC with Roger Benton – 360w360 E.256

360 WoodWorking - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 4:10am
Live-Edge Slabs from NYC with Roger Benton – 360w360 E.256

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking, we talk with Roger Benton, co-owner of Re-Co BKLYN (recobklyn.com), a woodworking shop that builds fine furniture and produces live-edge slabs and boards. And the majority of the lumber is taken directly out of the city’s waste stream. Roger shares how the business got started, and reveals a few facts about New York city and its vast lumber resources.

Join 360 Woodworking every Thursday for a lively discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more).

Continue reading Live-Edge Slabs from NYC with Roger Benton – 360w360 E.256 at 360 WoodWorking.

Here’s yours truly fielding some questions on Japanese...

Giant Cypress - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 3:28am


Here’s yours truly fielding some questions on Japanese woodworking — specifically, using Japanese saws with western saws, taking care of Japanese tools, where to start with Japanese tools, and sharpening. This was filmed while making my videos on Japanese tools for Popular Woodworking, as a sort of behind-the-scenes featurette.

As a side note, I’m happy to answer questions on woodworking, Japanese or otherwise, or any other subject, for that matter. You can contact me via the “Ask” link at the top of the page, and my other contact info is at the bottom of the page.

a no title post....

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:54am
Almost zero shop time tonight. I had to make a pit stop at Wally World tonight and they don't sell Simple Green. Benny's is or was a Rhode Island institution and it was the first store I remember going in as a kid. They sold Simple Green cheap but they went out of business last week. They weren't exactly a hardware store nor were they a department store.  They were kind of the two but small scale and a few tics above a dollar store. Another memory I can talk about to other people and watch the vacant expressions on their faces.

I will have to wait for the weekend and go to Ocean State Junk Lot and see if they have it. It is a hit or miss affair with that store. You never know what they have in stock. Lowes sells it but for almost 3 times the price Benny's used to sell it for. That will be the absolute last resort.

two for Miles and one for me
Paul Sellers recommends a flat file as an essential tool and I agree. It works wonderfully on smoothing end grain. It will serve double duty filing scrapers too. The japanese square is one I have and I like it. I don't use it much because it is hidden away in a cabinet. Maybe he'll use it more than I use mine.

got this for me
Woodcraft sells 6mm plywood. This 6mm iron will make a groove for it. If it doesn't you will hear me screaming my displeasure that it doesn't.


won't fit in here
I really don't want to keep the 6mm iron in here. I can put the 1/4" iron in the plane and 6mm in it's slot. Or I could just put the 6mm in the plane. I don't like either scenario. I think it would be too easy to confuse one for the other. Besides, I would have to chop a slot in the plane body holder in the box so I can stow the plane body with an iron in it.

what I plan on doing
I will make a holder for the 6mm iron and glue it to this end of the box. I put this box on the sharpening bench so I'll remember to do it this weekend.



dadoes chopped
The chopping went real quick with the 2" chisel. Two whacks covered the 3" + on the width. Used the 1" chisel to knock down the wedge in the middle and flatten it.

router got me to depth
It has taken me quite a while to get to this point with the housing joint. Both of these fit snug and both are self supporting. Worth the struggle to get here and finally to be able to make good fitting housing dadoes repeatedly.

this way
Long grain facing out and end grain facing out on the ends.

or this way
End grain facing up and long grain on the ends.  With this orientation I'll be gluing end grain to long grain. I'll need some kind of fastener to help secure the joint. I could use miller dowels or long screws. With the spacer installed this way I don't have to worry about expansion and contraction  changing the distance from the back to the front edge of the spacer. But I do have to look at the end grain which I don't like.

I went with the first way - long grain facing out. I'll have a strong and secure long grain to long grain glue joint. Expansion and contraction may or may not be a problem. The spacers are about 3 3/8" wide so I'm betting that I won't have to worry about it. And they are both sequential pieces from the same board.

planing the face
This planing run was to clean up all the pencil marks. I've been doing my planing wrong as I usually start here and plane forward.

the way I should be doing it
I don't recall the video I saw this in but Paul Sellers explained how to do it. He said you plane the board is sections, starting at the left end and working back. If you are left handed you would start at the right and work to the left. Paraphrasing what he said, doing it this way you are planing from an unplaned area into one that is planed. The plane isn't going over a freshly planed spot as it would be if I did my way. He's been right on a lot of other things so I'll give a try too.

I'm glad I checked this
The one on the left is square to the back but this one was off. It was leaning to the right a few frog hairs. It took me a few whacks with the mallet to get it square and to keep it there. I came down after dinner to make sure it was still square - it was.

I wanted to get the second round of stripping on the plane done but it will have to wait. I got a throw away brush to slop the stripper on and I hope that it'll last so I can do the other two planes with it too.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia (36 letters)?
answer - a fear of long words


PS I found my Roman Woodworking book and the 'A' thing is a libella in Latin and was used by stone masons and woodworkers.

Rabbet Plane Build Split in Half

Journeyman's Journal - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 12:36am

I had some free time on my hands, yeah, I know, shock, horror I got free time. I returned to an unfinished project I started a few months ago building a wooden rabbet plane.  I was boring a 1″ hole near the escapement when CRACK the bit split the timber in two.

Rather than chuck the plane away, I glued it back together again with fish glue.  Those cam clamps provide just enough pressure without risking crushing the fibres.  I say that because I reattached it as is without doing disturbing the break. Fortunately for me the break was clean with no missing parts.

rabbet-split

I left the plane oversized in length, width and thickness. When I inserted the iron and wedged it, I noticed the plane bowed ever so slightly.  Maybe when I put the cover on the rabbeted grip, the bow may not return.  I guess I’ll have to wait and see.


Categories: Hand Tools

A small barn for the summer house 14, starting on the staircase.

Mulesaw - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 12:27pm
In the evenings I have tried to start out on the staircase for the  small barn. The work is not very efficient, since both Gustav and Asger have started some projects in the shop too. I try to help them out, and once they are tucked into bed, I'll have something like an hour where I can use the shop by myself.
I have milled the steps, and they are pretty close to the thickness of the floor boards (1.75"). The two longitudinal parts of the staircase (I have no idea what the correct English word is?) Are a bit thinner. I would have liked them to be the same size, but the two boards that I had of the correct width were fairly twisted, so it took some thickness to get them flat and level. I suppose that I could have milled some new boards, but they would not have been as dry as those, and they finally ended up something like 1 3/8" which I think will be strong enough.

I have been looking as Das Zimmermannsbuch  for some inspiration, and they suggest that for the more modern approach you should attache the steps by means of sliding dovetails.
An older and simpler method is to just use a groove and either make a tenon on half of the steps or secure the steps by means of nails. I think that I'll go with the groove and nails model. Because the barn is supposed to be kept a bit simple.

Right now I have had to devise some special workholding, in order to be able to joint the edges of the longitudinal parts.
10' is a bit too long for my workbench, but perhaps that could justify building another and larger one?

There will be very 8" in height difference between each step, and the angle of the stairs will be 58 degrees. So it will be a fairly steep staircase, but this is to avoid that it will take up too much space in the relatively small room of the barn.

Asger sanding a cutting board. Gustav's apple crates are in the background-

My co-driver Bertha sniffing the fresh autumn air.


Workholding of the long parts of the staircase.


Categories: Hand Tools

Greenwood Fest June 5-10, 2018

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 11:57am
photo Marie Pelletier

People’s lives get busier every year. Ours too. Good thing we have all these time-saving devices…

today’s post is just a “save the date” sort of thing. Plymouth CRAFT’s Greenwood Fest will be early June again, same venue = Pinewoods Dance Camp, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA.

Festival June 8-10; pre-Fest courses June 5-7. TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 2, 2018. We will let you know details as we get it together – this is just so you can get the time off of work, quit your job, cancel graduation/wedding, etc and tell your family you’ll be in the woods.

2017 group photo, Marie Pelletier

Here’s the beginnings of the website. https://www.greenwoodfest.org/

Dave Fisher, photo Marie Pelletier

See you there, OK?


What are the very very wide kanna called and used for? You posted a photo of a 13" one back when you were at NYKEZ. Most kanna I've seen for sale (complete or as just a blade) tend to top out at around 70mm, rarely going to 80mm.

Giant Cypress - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 10:08am

The very wide kanna are called okanna (sometimes ookanna). The “standard” kanna size is a 70mm blade. The ones I use for bench work range from 60-70mm. Okanna can be 120-150mm wide.

I’ve only seen an okanna used for demonstrations, and haven’t heard of anyone using them for routine work. There are a couple of reasons why you might not want to do that. I’ve pulled ookannas before, and it’s noticeably harder to pull, which isn’t a surprise given that you’re planing close to twice the width of a regular shaving. Twice the width means twice the work.

Also, the blade is going to be harder to sharpen given its size. Maintaining the dai is going to be more difficult for the same reason. And then you have to make sure that the blade and dai match up well.

That’s not to say that there isn’t someone out there using an ookanna in their shop on a regular basis. It’s just that I haven’t heard of that happening.

Celebrating Five Years!

Paul Sellers - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 4:15am

Hard to imagine though it is, it’s been 5 years to the day that we posted our first video series on woodworkingmasterclasses.com. Since then we have published 400 video episodes and that does not include YouTube. I won’t prolong this blog post because the video speaks for itself. I would like to thank you all […]

Read the full post Celebrating Five Years! on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Where Moxon Got His Mojo

Tools For Working Wood - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 4:00am

For over a decade I've been looking for a copy I could afford of Andre Felibien's masterwork, "Des Principes de l'Architecture, de la Sculpture, de la Peinture et des ..." [Principles of Architecture, Sculpture, Painting and ..] A copy finally popped up on the internet and I grabbed it. I have been spending the last week studying it. The book is well known, and you can get a scan on Google books here. I collect books. While it's wonderful to be able to read the book online from practically anywhere, I find having a real book in front of me is far more satisfying. The book's woodworking section starts at page 170, with all the plates are in the following pages.

There are several editions of the book, the first from 1676. This is the book that Joseph Moxon used to copy drawing from when he published the woodworking section of "Mechanick Exercises" two years later in 1678. If you haven't read Moxon, we stock the Lost Art Press version, or you can read the 1703 third edition here.

Moxon's "Mechanick Exercises" is important because it is the first book in English that tries to be a handbook on how to make things. Beginning in 1677, every few months or so Moxon released a chapter on a different subject. Blacksmithing, carpentry, house-righting were a few of the topics. In 1683, after a hiatus of several years while England was in turmoil, Moxon resumed the series, this time writing about something he know about personally: printing and typemaking. Whereas Felibien's book was really an encyclopedia of tools and objects - this is a hammer, this is a nail - Moxon pioneered the "How-to." The point of Felibien's book, in my view, was to give rich, educated people the ability to find out the basics of the world around them. Studying Plato at University was fine and dandy, but an educated person should not be confused by the real life going around them.


Moxon took it a step further. "Mechanick Exercises" tells a little about the tools; instead, it instructs. Here is the way to grind a tool, how to chop a mortise, etc. Fairly short in length, and written by someone who was far from an expert or a craftsperson in anything except printing, the book falls short of being comprehensive. But Moxon gets full marks or trying, and it's exciting to read his result.



It is pretty obvious - and has been known for a long time - that Moxon used Felibien as a source for all his tool illustrations. Seeing the original engravings started me thinking. First of all, if Moxon's book used French pictures, then one can assume that what is in Moxon are actually drawings of French tools. And in fact, many of the few surviving English tools from that era look different than the tools illustrated in Mechnick Exercises.

Another point I am pondering: the vise that we now call a Moxon Vise is hanging off in space on the side of the workbench, but are shown much larger hanging on the wall in Felibien's workshop. I love my Moxon Bench because the modern incarnation sits on top of my bench, raising the height for dovetailing and other joinery. But Moxon doesn't mention it in the text and neither book shows the vise in a modern usages. Felibien calls it a wood press, or vise, but that's doesn't help much, although the size of the vises in his book suggest that they were used for clamping things together, not as a vise raiser.

Probably the most obvious conclusion I can reach from comparing the photos is that Moxon really did a crappy job. The images are all crammed together on one plate, and two of the tools - the workbench and the frame saw - are cut off at the edge. The engravings are crude compared to Felibien's.



How were the engravings done? And who was the engraver? We really don't know. At the time of publication, Moxon was a successful printer so he would have had staff, but he also probably had enough skill to do the not-so-great engravings himself. I consulted by phone with my friend Jeff Peachey, a noted book conservator (who hasn't seem this copy in the flesh yet) His guess is that the engraver (whoever it was) just propped up the Felibien up and then directly sketched out the tool images on the copper plate. This would explain why the images are all reversed in the final print. We suspect the engraver might have used some sort of optical aid to help with the copying on some of the images. Moxon's image are greatly reduced in size from the original French ones, probably because he was trying to fit about 4 pages of tools onto one smaller page. That being said, and the reason why I suspect the involvement of an aid of a sort, is that planes drawings are a pretty good copy of the original image, but one of the saws is missing a little off the right side. The problematic saw would have been the last one engraved if the engraver worked from left to right (as you would if you were right handed). I think that if he was drawing freehand and just using the book as a reference he would have scaled it to fit. As it is it looks like he was in a rush, started off doing a pretty good engraved copy, but then ran out of space. Some of the smaller tools are pretty crude, as if he didn't see the need for a careful copy. The biggest change from Felibien is on the workbench. The wood press on the wall became something hanging in front of Moxon's bench. One interesting fact is that Moxon's bench has a hook front on the left and Felibien's doesn't. This suggests that Moxon might have copied the images but he was trying at least on some level to do more than just condense and copy a picture.


While I find the facts of the case interesting, and speculation on how the books came about fun, the real thrill for someone like me who loves history is just seeing these real-live books together. We don't know for sure how Moxon got the idea for "Mechanick Exercises," but I can tell you it is very possible that being a printer he had a copy of the French book soon after publication in 1676 and got the brainwave to take it one step further. I know when I was looking at Felibien and starting to understand some of the text, I found myself wondering: Okay, I know it's a woodpress, but describing it isn't enough. How do you use it? And, nice chisels! What do you use them for?

I guess that's the same question Moxon asked himself. But unlike me, he got off his duff and published a book about it.




Ask M&T: “What is a Fore Plane?”

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 3:57am

 

Mike and I just posted a new installment of our YouTube series: “Ask M&T”. In this video, we cover one of the most frequent questions we get online or at shows: What is a fore plane? Mike recounts his early struggles with hand tools using a little block plane to remove bulk material and eventually realized he was using the wrong tool for the job. What he needed was the coarse roughing tool called a fore plane. In this video, we explain why we believe this tool is absolutely essential for every hand-tool woodworker. 

We then touch on the history of the terms “fore” plane, “jack” plane, and “scrub” plane and explain our preference for the wooden version. There is also some discussion about where to get them and what to look for. 

The three key features of a fore plane are:

  1. 16” length (give or take a couple inches)
  2. Convex iron
  3. Wide open mouth 

Enjoy the video and send us more questions for future installments!

- Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

oh no Mr Bill......

Accidental Woodworker - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 1:03am
A blast from past Saturday Night Live days. I had a Mr Bill moment tonight in the shop. I was snapping my last pic before shutting out the lights and I noticed a boo boo. I don't know how many pics I thought I had snapped but it made no never mind. I didn't have a SD card in the camera. I saw it on the last pic because I actually read what was on the LCD screen. It said no camera card installed. The first thought I had that echoed in the brain bucket was, "what idiot forgot to not only put in the card but didn't notice it sooner"?  Ah, that idiot would be me because I can't blame my wife or the cats for it.

Some pics I could snap again like the very last one. The others I didn't try to stage again. So I took a few to show the what I had done. But it was a short night in the shop so I'm sure the pic count would not have been too high anyways.


the after pic
 I sanded the interior and cleaned it with Orange Clean. I wanted to use Simple Green but I couldn't find the bottle. Then I remember my wife had taken it. I wanted to clean the inside of grease, dirt, etc before I applied the stripper. The stripper worked from the frog seat aft rather well. Forward of the frog seat, not so good. What little japanning that was left there didn't all come off.


this actually looks better
I used the spray stuff tonight for round one. Tomorrow night I will use the paste stuff on the left. The plane collector uses this and he lets it sit for 15 minutes before rinsing it off. I don't have a sand blaster like him so I'll be trying another round of stripper. After round #2 I'll see what I can do with a wire wheel in a drill.

from NH plane parts
I found this after my first 3 hunts came up dry. I snagged this set as soon as I saw it. I didn't even look at the price until I checked out. Almost no rust, dirt, or grunge on either piece. And the iron has a whole lot of life left to it. This will be going in Miles's #6.


why I bought it
This was the iron in Miles's #6 plane. I am going to hang onto the iron and see if I ever get anywhere near to it's use. I now have an extra chip breaker that I don't have to buy. I need one for a bare iron out of a 4 1/2. This chipbreaker is the first one I have bought that had the front forward end stoned so that it lays absolutely flat on the iron.



plumb bob for the 'A' thing - still no proper name for it

plumb bob for the Plumb line stick
Now I have to buy some twine or cotton cord. All I have is some fish line and I don't want to use that if I don't have to.

it is the center

I drew a line from the bottom angle by my finger, to the apex of the top one. It went almost dead nuts through the diagonals I drew yesterday. I am going to put the hole for the plumb bob string about a 1/2" above the center point.

prepped the plumb line stick
I checked for twist on the flat face I did yesterday and found none. I checked the opposite face and it had a teeny bit that I planed out. I then squared both edges, sawed and squared up the two offsets, and laid out where the dados will go. I'll chop them out tomorrow and glue them in place.

here is the pic of the outside edge Frank
This is the 15" square I just bought. It definitely isn't square but it also isn't a large round over neither. The question that is bugging me now, is why is it rounded and not square?

maybe it is for this????
The only thing I came up with this is that it helps somehow with checking for an outside square reading. With the roundish edge it will be easier to set it down this way and position it.


portable square till
My lunchtime doodling. I am thinking of making a portable till/box to keep the squares in. Having this will free up a lot of real estate in the tills in the toolbox. If I don't do that, I may have to make a bigger tool box. I bought what looks to be a 12 inch copy of the 15" square.  I think I can get all of the squares in this. The drawing doesn't show the 12 and 6 inch combo squares.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was the first black actor to win an Emmy as a lead actor in a comedy series?
answer - Robert Guillaume for Benson in 1985   (he passed away last week)

Domino dilemmas

Heartwood: Woodworking by Rob Porcaro - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 8:59pm
Domino joints
The Domino sure makes joinery easy: fast layout, cutting parts directly to length, mortises in a flash, no fussy trimming of tenon shoulders, and no trips to the sharpening bench. This may come at a price, however, if you fall into the seductive trap of machine woodworking, which is letting the limitations of the machine […] 0
Categories: Hand Tools

We’ll see Summer come again…

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 6:03pm

the title is for Michael Rogen, just to let him know I’m thinking of him. I like that summer’s gone. Fall is a beautiful time of year here. I am especially enjoying seeing how the light in the shop changes now. Today the light caught my eye a number of times. If I’m not careful, I’ll take as many photos as Rick McKee https://www.instagram.com/medullary_rick/ 

I used some auger bits this past weekend, and again today. I had the box of them out on the bench…

I’ve started the next project recently, and two carvings for it were standing up out of the way…

Today I got to work some in the shop, after teaching for 7 days straight (a student here for a week, and Plymouth CRAFT for the weekend). Time to finish off some stuff, first up is the wainscot chair. For this seat, I do use a template, in this case to map out the square mortises chopped in the seat board so it slips over the stiles. Here’s the seat board with its template off to the left. Complete with dust in the sunlight..

I’ve done lots of these, but it’s always worth it to go slowly – you have to get the holes just right, or they have gaps, or worse, the seat splits at the very narrow area beside the stile. Once I’m satisfied with the template’s fit, I scribe the locations of the mortises on the seat. That short grain right between the upper right hand corner of this mortise and the end grain is the fragile part. I’ve split them there, and seen them split on old ones.

Then I bore around the perimeter of the mortise with an auger bit.

Then chop with the chisel to bring the mortise to the proper shape. I scored the lines with a knife and/or awl. Very careful work with the chisel.

Once I have the mortise squared off, I bevel underneath, paring the walls of the mortise so it’s undercut. I only want the mortise tight on the stiles right at the top where it shows. I’ve never checked the underside of this joint on a period chair – but I like the idea of under-cutting it & beveling it. It relieves any un-necessary pressure there.

Then slip the seat down to test it.

Then I do the molding around the front and sides. Sides (end grain) first. A rabbet plane followed by a smooth plane. In this case, a moving filletster and the LN low angle jack plane.

I scored the line ahead of the filletster so I got a clean shoulder to this rabbet. The nicker on that plane is defunct. Then I used this Lie-Nielsen plane to round over the corner of the rabbet to create the thumbnail molding.

I work the front edge after the two ends, to clean up any tear-out. This seat is a nice clear radially-riven oak, two boards edge-glued together. Works great.

Then for good measure, I threw the arms in place, so I could test it out. The seat will be pegged into the three rails; square pegs in round holes.

These chairs are smaller than they look. They’re so imposing because of all the decoration, the bulk of the parts – but they’re really pretty snug chairs.

Here’s the important view – looks pretty tight around the stiles. Whew.

If you made it this far, thanks. 15 pictures – for me that’s over 2 weeks of Instagram. I like IG, but the blog is my favorite way to show what I’m up to…more detail, more depth. More work – but it’s fun. thanks for keeping up with me…


To Quote My Old Man, "Boy, What the Hell Were You Thinking"...

The Part-Time Woodworker - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 1:35pm
To say I'm surprised by the lack of comments regarding my experiment with Bondo and veneer would be an understatement. In fact, I have been mildly shocked by the lack of comments raking me over the coals for doing something that isn't considered a normal way to do things. The only thing I can think of that would keep the, "you-can't-do-it-that-way" boys from ripping me a new one is that they think I'm beyond help.

So what the hell was I thinking...

  Why Construction Grade ply?
This is mainly to do with price, but also to do with convenience. 
One sheet of 11mm Good One Side Fir Sanded Plywood at Lowe's or Home Depot is less than $50 a sheet. Included in that price is up to five cuts to the sheet, so getting the stock into the trunk of my wife's Fusion to take home was never a problem. 
  Why two layers of 11mm fir ply?
I wanted the material thickness to be in the same scale as the cabinet it defines. This is a fair-sized cabinet so its components should reflect that. I didn't need a full 1" thick. All I needed was material that was obviously thicker than 3/4", hence the laminated 11mm ply, which, when veneered on both sides, ends up being a very thin hair thinner than 1".
By laminating two 11mm pieces I could ensure they were dead flat during glue-up and they would stay that way after they came out of the clamps (ok, when the screws were removed - don't be so picky).
  Why not use pre-veneered ply?
I wanted White Oak veneer, not Red. The box stores only sell Red Oak Veneered ply, so I would have to purchase what I needed at a hardwood lumber yard, rent a truck to get it home, and fight with it to cut it up as I do not own a panel saw.
Price!  
Also, I have never done any veneering before and I wanted to try it. 
  Why veneer before assembly? 
Every component included in this cabinet is flat-slabbed. There isn't a curved surface on it. Believe me, I tried to add a curve or two, but when I did, I lost a lot of storage room where the corners once were. Because it is just flat panels, I guessed that fitting the veneer would be far easier if I had to trim 1" thick stock than it would be if I had to deal with stock that was 0.8mm thick.
  Why use Bondo? 
You can't be a car-guy who grew up in the '50s and '60s and not know about Bondo. 3M makes Bondo, and they also make a slightly heavier two-part filler called White Lightnin'. They recommend both for metal and wood, but I have found that the Bondo is quicker to work with for lighter applications, such as fairing my plywood slabs.
Peace,

Mitchell
Categories: Hand Tools

In Stock: Limited Edition LAP Hats

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 7:48am

marriage_mark_hat_IMG_1070

You can now purchase our limited edition “marriage mark” hats in the online store. The hats are $27, and that price includes shipping in the United States (sorry these hats are not available to international customers).

You can purchase your hat via this link. You might want to hurry as there are only 100 available.

These are hats were embroidered and stamped by Texas Heritage Woodworks, so the work is crisp and perfect. These hats are made in China by Adams. But they are the best hat we could find before getting into the $100 baseball cap territory.

— Christopher Schwarz


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Categories: Hand Tools

New Site for Vision

Paul Sellers - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 7:33am

And a site it was just one year ago. Looking through a wired-off rectangle of waste land covered with old rubble from former construction work, I wondered to myself, “Could this ugly land be home to the work we want to progress quickly into the future?” Progress comes at a price and one part of the […]

Read the full post New Site for Vision on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

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