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How To Grind Part 6 - How to Repair a Damaged Edge Without Burning the Steel

Tools For Working Wood - Wed, 02/08/2017 - 4:00am

Previous parts are found here:
Part 1 is here.
Part 2 is here.
Part 3 is here.
Part 4 is here.
Part 5 is here.

In previous blogs we discussed the need for grinding for a variety of reasons. This final reason is the most unfortunate one: you need to repair a damaged cutting edge. This problem could come about from dropping the chisel (see photo), burning the steel from incorrect grinding, or any number of crises. If we were to grind out the damage by just grinding the bevel like we normally do, we would burn the steel and create more damage. The drawing illustrates the problem. Constant grinding on the bevel heats up the entire bevel. When the damaged tip get heated, the heat has no place to go - especially when the rest of the bevel is heated up too. Even with a cool wheel, this will be a problem.

The solution to this problem is simple. We first level up the tool rest and grind the chisel end square past the damage. As we are only grinding at the tip, not the entire bevel, there is little heat, and the heat has someplace to go (see sketch).










I can free-hand grind pretty square on a crowned wheel, but a scribe line to guide your grinding can be useful. Or after grinding, a few passes on a stone to ensure a straight edge can be helpful. If you are a little off, it doesn't matter. Final honing fixes everything. As you can see in the picture, you want to grind back to an even flat just past the damage on the chisel.

Then we will reset the rest and grind to a wire edge, just like we did before in Part 5. The only difference is that instead of setting the rest to grind in the middle of the bevel, we want to grind a bit towards the back of the bevel to compensate for the blunt edge we just ground. If you are shortening the bevel angle and not really correcting damage, you would also grind a blunt end, but not move the bevel back.



In Part 5, when I ground the chisel I checked to see my bevel disappear, then stopped. In this case, the bevel will disappear fairly quickly, but my work will not be done until I have removed the blunt end. As I grind, I look to see that the flat end starts to disappear. In the first photo, the flat end is about half gone (and uneven). I continue the grinding, with more effort on the thick side, until both sides are even and the edge (seen as a white refection in the light) disappears. Then I am done and ready to hone.


This concludes this series on grinding. I hope it make sense to you and I hope the series encourages you to grind your tools for better geometry.
Here are links to some of the production I have mentioned in the series:
Norton 3X Grinding Wheels
Crowned CBN Grinding Wheels
Fancy Wheel Dressers
Plain Wheel Dressers
Custom Baldor Grinders that we have tricked out with better wheels, balance, and adjustments
Diamond Stones

For instructions on honing your freshly ground edges - click here.
Also searching my blog will turn up a lot of sharpening material from past years.
Finally if you are in the NYC area I will be teaching both grinding and honing in two free classes in March. Please see the events menu for the exact schedule, more classes will show up shortly.

Thanks for reading, Joel

Where have all the forums gone?

Giant Cypress - Wed, 02/08/2017 - 3:08am
image

When I started out in woodworking, one of the resources I drew upon were woodworking forums. They were a great source of information, and I learned a lot from them. In addition, they worked well with my day job. I’m a pediatric oncologist, and checking in on a woodworking forum was a great way to fill the time between patients, or when I was up at night on call waiting for the emergency room to get back to me.

Recently, the idea that woodworking forums are dead has popped up from time to time. Fine Woodworking is closing down their woodworking forum, if it isn’t already shut down. And although I can’t quantify this, it seems that activity on the woodworking forums I usually look in on has been tailing off.

I don’t think, however, that internet discussion of woodworking is going away. Like many things on the internet, social media seems to be the place to be. First, it’s one less thing for you to do. Have a Facebook account? You can check in on an online gathering of woodworkers without having to go to another website. It will be right there in your feed.

Second, woodworking is a very visual hobby. In woodworking discussions, a picture is at least 1,000 words. It is far easier to embed a picture in a post on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr (which is the backbone of Giant Cypress), which gives these platforms a big advantage compared to woodworking forums. In the case of Instagram, photos are the raison d’être of that platform. With woodworking forums, you often had to upload photos to a hosting service, then link to that service within your forum post using BBCode. Alternatively, some woodworking forums allow you to upload photos directly to their sites, but then they might try to pull something like reselling your photos as a way of generating revenue, as Sawmill Creek tried to do several years ago.

It seems, then, that woodworking forums aren’t really dying out as much as they are moving. There was a Japanese woodworking forum that really seems to have died out. But there are two very active Japanese woodworking groups on Facebook which are well worth checking out, if you have a Facebook account: the Piedmont Japanese Carpentry Club, and the Japanese Woodworking Tools, Techniques and Interests page. If you have a Facebook account, you should definitely take a look.

almost had a lid......

Accidental Woodworker - Wed, 02/08/2017 - 12:19am
I've heard it said that almost only applies to hand grenades and horseshoes. It sure doesn't apply to making lids. Close puts you in left field and with a small one, tiny errors will give you burnt toast. Tonight I got oh so close but no brass ring.

crosscut was first
I lost a couple of inches but I couldn't avoid it. I didn't want that hole in the lid and it was on the wide side of the board so it had to go.

ripping it out a 1/8" over
I also made it a 1/4" over in length too.

1/8' over
It will be a frog hair or two less after I plane the sawn edge smooth.

rabbet laid out
Trying to erase pencil marks from end grain is near impossible to do. This is one of the reasons why I made the lid a 1/4" longer than needed. A sharp plane will erase pencil marks without any problems.

10 1/2 to plane the rabbets
I have only used this plane a few times but I am really liking it more than my Lee Valley rabbet plane. I think it being a 'plane' like my other bench planes has lent a lot of familiarity with it. I enjoy using this and I don't have to deal that damn depth stop on the LV plane.

it's tapered
 I noticed that I run inboard as I go down the board. There is barely a hint of pencil at the far end. Not a deal killer because I can always plane down to the line and a little bit past it if need be.

how I start it
I went slowly and carefully this time. I tried to stay off of the line and parallel to it and I did pretty good on that. It took me about 3 runs down the board before I had a wall I could run the plane against. I still ran slightly inboard at the far end but not as much as I did on the first one.

got the tongue to fit on both sides

the rabbet is off square a bit
the versatile 10 1/2
I planed the rabbet with it, planed the shoulder square, and finally used it to get the lid width to fit between the grooves. Can't do all that with the LV rabbet plane.

a little snug and it slides in and out
Houston, we have a problem
The lid is cocked to the right. The back edge is rough sawn but it is almost square and it shows a tapered gap.

I can cock it just as bad to the left
This tells me either the lid is too thin in the width or the box is bowed on the sides. And the sides don't look bowed.

the box is square and not tapered or bowed
the lid is parallel
what is the problem?
I knew it was square - this confirms it
confirmed this end is dead nuts square
Everything points to the lid being too narrow for the opening. I planed it for snug fit at the opening and once it is in the box it gets loose as a goose.

the problem
The shims I glued in the gap extended into the groove a little ways on both sides. The lid does fit snugly between these two points.

a strong 16th over
I trimmed the shims back to the wall of the groove and checked the fit of lid. This is why the lid is cocking in the box. That is way too much clearance and especially so on a short length lid.

splitting some scrap
I only have two holes to plug on this box and I'm using the same stock as the box. I'll make another lid again tomorrow. I'll finish up tonight by doing these two plugs.

splitting it again
I sawed off this piece and from this second split I'll get the two pieces I need to plug the holes.

did all the trimming and fitting with this chisel
I took small bites and checked the fit after each swipe. I kept at it until I got a fit that filled the whole hole.

ready to glue in place
tap tap gently
I have lost 60% of my hearing but I can hear the slight difference in the pitch when this bottoms out. I can also feel it and it is very important not to do just one more tap. This wood is dry, thin, and would split out in a heartbeat. (my hearing is still normal for low sounds like hammer blows. I've lost my hearing mostly in the range that speech is in)

one last check point
I made sure that the plug didn't come through all the way into the groove past the back. That would keep the lid from closing against the back.

the tequila box
The line in the middle is the outline of the bottle up from the bottom edge. The 1x6 stock is 5 1/2 wide and the bottle is 3 1/2 wide at it's widest point. I want to ensure that I can get the lid and bottom grooves in and still have room for the bottle.

about 4 1/2"
I eyeballed the top and bottom grooves and it looks like I will have enough room for the bottle. I don't want to glue up stock for this. If I had too, I would go get some wider stock at Lowes.

my ebonizing liquids
The left and middle ones will be tried again. The one on right is iron acetate and that doesn't turn wood black. I have been thinking of trying this out as it's been over a month since I last used it and I'll be able to gauge it's effectiveness after sitting for a while.

the last thing I ebonized
I don't have a lot of wood species to try out. I have cherry, walnut and red oak I'll be trying. My plate is already kind of full but I think I can squeeze this in. Updates and pics to follow.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What was the first car to have a horn ring on the steering wheel?
answer - the 1936 Cord 810/812

Table Trestles-Part 3

Hillbilly Daiku - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 4:59pm

With the top slabs thicknessed, cut to size and squared it was time for the layout.  This was a simple task of transferring the layout from my design drawing to the slabs.

trestle_standard_tableThere are several ways that I can translate my scaled drawing into full-scale.  Sometimes I simply pull out a piece of paper and draw the project to size.  This is handy because it gives me something to continually check my actual pieces against.  Other times I may lay out a story stick.  For this project I simply created a full-scale version of the module block that is found on the drawing.  No matter the method, most of the work is done with dividers once the initial base measurement is established.  In this case that measurement is 180mm.

I first drew a 180mm square on a scrap of ply.  Then stepped off all of the required divisions with dividers.  Once I had the full-scale module in hand, I then had an instrument that I could use for either direct transfer of distance or I could set my dividers to.  At any rate, the layout was completed as per my drawing.

img_2901

I’ll not bore you with the drilling and reaming operation.  I’ve done that in previous posts.  ;). After a good bit of work with the brace, all four trestles were legged up.

img_0295

The next order of business was to make the spindles for each leg pair.  I sawed several blanks of white oak so that I could try a couple of different shapes and methods.  No matter the shape, each spindle needed a 1/2″ tenon at each end.  I struggled as to how best to make these tenons, but it finally dawned on me that I could use the same tapered tenon cutter that I used for the leg tenons.   When a piece is passed completely through the cutter the emerging portion is a constant ~9/16″ diameter.  So all I needed to do was run the spindles through the tenon cutter so that the required length of tenon was passed through the cutter.  Then it was a simple matter of using my knife to trim and fit the tenon to the 1/2″ mortise hole.

img_0296

The first spindle shape that I tried was cigar-shaped.  It was easy to make, but didn’t seem right for the octagonal legs of these trestles.

img_0297

The next spindle shape that I made was octagonal and I left them intentionally a little rough.  I like this shape much better for the octagonal legs.

img_0298

It has become almost a signature of mine to add some sort of knot work to my projects.  Usually this shows up as knotted pulls for drawers, but in this instance I went with a turk’s head knot to add a bit of interest to the spindles.  The knot sits in a recessed area centered along the length of the spindle.  I made the recess with my carving knife and added a little wood burning to the corners of the octagon.

img_0300

Next up were the mortise holes in the legs.  To mark them I squared a board and on it marked the distance of the mortise holes from the bottom face of the trestle.  Then set the board in place on the inverted trestle and marked the mortise holes.

img_2902

In his book, “The Anarchist’s Design Book”, CS recommends a spade bit with an extension.  I had neither and when I went to the Big Box store I found an extra long spade bit and went with that.  I was worried that I would have chipout when drilling the holes, but found that the spade bit created a surprisingly clean hole.

img_2903

I chamfered all of the edges of the top slabs and added a little wood burning embellishments to the tops and legs.

img_0303

I hope to be able to assemble these trestles this coming weekend.  Then I’ll tackle the table tops.

Part 2 Greg Merritt Part 4


Categories: Hand Tools

Now Shipping Internationally!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 12:07pm

 

One of the most consistent requests we’ve received since the launch of Mortise & Tenon is the ability to ship internationally. We regularly get requests from all over the globe for t-shirts, DVDs, and especially the brown-paper-wrapped and wax-sealed magazines. It took us a while to get things lined up be able to handle international fulfillment, but we finally feel ready to give it a shot.

So… we are now receiving international orders for anything sold in our store. Were you one of those folks that wrote us looking for a wrapped magazine? Now you can get your own copy. Wish you had the new shirt (or almost discontinued one) and new sticker? It’s yours.

Even though we are excited about this opportunity, we are also cautious about it because we fear headaches and hurdles. In all honesty, if it ends up not working out for us, we may have to permanently close international orders again so our advice is that if you really want these things, you should order sooner than later. Hopefully, there will be no problems and we can keep this opportunity forever but we just want to be upfront that we can’t make any promises. Regardless, we will continue to have our stockists carry the magazine (for a more economical shipping option) and as always, only magazines ordered on our website will be getting the fancy wrapping. It’s not something we can supply to stockists.

We appreciate your patience with us as we embark on this new front in the business. As you may recall, we’re just two guys (with the help of some friends) running this publication. We are very small scale but try our best to keep all our customers happy.

So... here goes, folks! Welcome to our store!

¡Bienvenidos!
Bienvenue!
ようこそ!
Velkommen!
Добро пожаловать! 

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Now Shipping Internationally!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 12:07pm

 

One of the most consistent requests we’ve received since the launch of Mortise & Tenon is the ability to ship internationally. We regularly get requests from all over the globe for t-shirts, DVDs, and especially the brown-paper-wrapped and wax-sealed magazines. It took us a while to get things lined up be able to handle international fulfillment, but we finally feel ready to give it a shot.

So… we are now receiving international orders for anything sold in our store. Were you one of those folks that wrote us looking for a wrapped magazine? Now you can get your own copy. Wish you had the new shirt (or almost discontinued one) and new sticker? It’s yours.

Even though we are excited about this opportunity, we are also cautious about it because we fear headaches and hurdles. In all honesty, if it ends up not working out for us, we may have to permanently close international orders again so our advice is that if you really want these things, you should order sooner than later. Hopefully, there will be no problems and we can keep this opportunity forever but we just want to be upfront that we can’t make any promises. Regardless, we will continue to have our stockists carry the magazine (for a more economical shipping option) and as always, only magazines ordered on our website will be getting the fancy wrapping. It’s not something we can supply to stockists.

We appreciate your patience with us as we embark on this new front in the business. As you may recall, we’re just two guys (with the help of some friends) running this publication. We are very small scale but try our best to keep all our customers happy.

So... here goes, folks! Welcome to our store!

¡Bienvenidos!
Bienvenue!
ようこそ!
Velkommen!
Добро пожаловать! 

 

Categories: Hand Tools

The More I Give…

Paul Sellers - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 11:17am

From Journal  Entry Saturday 4th February 2017 …the More I Receive Through the years I have been engaged in training new-genre woodworkers from all backgrounds and I find myself ever-learning that communication is more about listening than whatever I might say. Mostly it’s something I’ve learnt from working with my wood and especially that using my hand …

Read the full post The More I Give… on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Meet the Author: Robert Wearing

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 8:27am
scan-2_1

Robert Wearing, at his drafting table.

Acclaimed craftsman and woodworking instructor Robert Wearing was formally trained at Loughborough College (now University) in Leicestershire, England. It was there, during the late 1940s, that a physical education teacher said a sentence that Wearing has embraced throughout his long and fulfilling career: “For teacher and pupil, a lesson should be an enjoyable, purposeful activity.”

For Wearing, his childhood lessons in the building of things came from his father, a sailor, and a model construction kit.

Both sides of Robert Wearing’s family came from the south of the United Kingdom’s Lake district. “After WWI my parents married there, but jobs for young officers were hard to find,” Wearing says. “So my father, like the rest of his family went to sea.”

Wearing’s father sailed in Atlantic liners, first to New York and then later to Rio de Janeiro, a six-week voyage. Between trips his father would spend two weeks restocking for the next voyage. The family moved into a house vacated by a family member in the port of Liverpool. This way, when Wearing’s father was on land, he could take the tram home each night to be with the family.

“He was not a craftsman,” Wearing says. “I would call him a useful handyman with tools bought in New York.” Wearing’s father enjoyed building models and mechanical devices with “Meccano,” a model construction system created in their hometown of Liverpool by Frank Hornby. Wearing’s father taught his son how to solder. And while at sea, Wearing’s father would compile lists of parts to convert. “I think I owe a great deal to Meccano, which taught me the basic principles of design,” Wearing says.

Also while at sea, Wearing says his father would design wireless sets, tracing the components on a board and then, once home, build up the circuits. “We had quite a number of sets before manufacturing set up,” Wearing says. “Early ones had headphones. I still remember the first horn-like speaker and its extension to various rooms, including my bedroom when I had a cold.”

Wearing attended a grammar school in Liverpool, learning a variety of subjects, including Latin, German and Spanish, but learned little about woodworking.

When not in school Wearing and his family spent holidays at Windermere in the Lakes. “We wandered the small fells nearby, developing the love of mountain walking,” he says. “When at home there was nothing exciting (to us) to do. I puttered in my little garden shed workshop and began my permanent interest in photography using a Vest Pocket Kodak and processing in the blacked-out bathroom, not popular in my family.”

in_the_war_img689

Wearing, serving in WWII.

Wearing served in WWII and after the war, the British government offered a Further Education and Training grant to ex-service personnel, whose training had been interrupted by the war. “Mine had not been but an exception made in the case of teaching,” Wearing wrote in an essay we published here. “There was an acute shortage, since many teachers had been killed and young men were conscripted before they could go to college.”

Wearing visited his old headmaster to inquire about an occupation. “He brought out a copy of every report written, and after perusing these said, ‘You seemed to excel at woodwork. Have you thought of teaching that? It is pleasant work: no preparation, no marking. How little did he know,’” Wearing says.

Wearing’s headmaster summoned a young man who had recently applied for a similar job. Wearing says the man’s advice was short and succinct: “Go to Loughborough. Don’t even think of anywhere else. They will make a craftsman out of you.”

“I like to think they did,” Wearing says, who studied at Loughborough from 1947 to 1950.  “This was a pivotal point in my life.”

Wearing wrote in a previous essay that the application to Loughborough required making a teapot stand, “a rather elaborately jointed mitered frame, holding a 6” x 6” ceramic title. I made this in a little garden shed workshop with what tools I had and little knowledge and went for the interview. It was accepted and I was in.”

chest2_dsc00897

Wearing’s dovetailed tool box.

Before arriving Wearing says he also had to make a dovetailed tool box — three boxes were fitted under each bench.

In those days Loughborough was mostly students studying engineering, and the rest were education — half woodworking and half physical education.

Wearing studied ancient and medieval history, English literature, education, handicraft and technical drawing. His first project from a supplied drawing was a small book rack made from agba, an African hardwood.

“It was a climate of excellent design and high-quality craftsmanship in the company of highly dedicated and motivated fellow students,” Wearing says. “But then we were not normal schoolboy entrants. We were older, some were married and some had children. We had seen the world and not the nicest parts.”

In the workshop, education was informal, and students were left alone to work on their approved drawings. There was a tutor available for consultation. “Each workshop also had a very competent cabinetmaker, who maintained the equipment,” Wearing wrote in his essay. “He was a mine of information and was always most helpful. That was Mr. Finch, who was always referred to as such. Nowadays he would be a technician of varying quality.”

Wearing’s next project was a small mahogany side table with a drawer. Because of timber rationing in the years surrounding the war, finding wood was difficult. But still, students needed wood. In addition to designing and building their own work, they had been tasked with building furniture, designed by renowned craftsman Edward Barnsley, for the college’s proposed library. So the students went to auction sales. A large Cuban mahogany dining table with extending leaves and massive rails proved quite useful. The legs were cut up for turnings. And the table became a paneled bookcase with sliding glass doors. The bottom of railway wagons, destroyed by bombings and deeply embedded with coal and dust, became a source of oak.

“When I took some pieces to the college sawmill, I was rudely sent away to first plane off the top charred ¼”, by hand,” Wearing wrote in his essay. “The boss later relented and agreed to saw and thickness them as the last job before the saw and blades were sharpened. In fact, it proved to be quite nice material, out of which I made several nice pieces in the garage of my hall of residence including a small circular table, which I still have. Also, a small wall hanging bureau.”

All of Wearing’s tutors were former Loughborough students, except for Cecil Gough who was the former foreman of Gordon Russell of Broadway, Gloucestershire. A man by the last name of Ockenden was the head of the department. He trained at Shoreditch College, which Wearing says rivaled Loughborough in terms of excellence. Barnsley gave several lectures and advised students on their individual designs.

Wearing says all the physical education students studied craftsmanship at a lower level and the crafts students studied some physical education. “We were all ex-service men from WWII and so was our physical education tutor who knew full well that we all thought that we had already done enough physical education for a lifetime,” Wearing says. “His slogan, which I have endeavored to follow was, ‘For teacher and pupil, a lesson should be an enjoyable, purposeful activity.’” Another slogan from this teacher? Coach, Correct, Encourage, Praise. “This works for all subjects,” Wearing says. “Although we were craft students, we enjoyed his periods.”

Wearing writes in his essay that there were few machines in the workshops, although they did have a band saw and lathe. He often wished for a circular saw. Wearing’s final project was an oak sideboard, planed by hand from 1” to ¾”.

Years later Wearing visited his son, David, at school. As he entered the school’s workshop Wearing said, “There has been a Lobro (Loughborough) man here.” His son confirmed this. “Though the man had gone, the atmosphere remained. But for how long?” Wearing says. “I wonder.”

After graduation Wearing taught at an independent school. “There was no local authority telling me what to do and what was forbidden,” he says. “I would have resented this by a person who knew less than I did and was a nonperformer.”

Long before computers were common, Wearing set up a press using a 19th-century treadle machine and moveable type. “I had a lot to learn here,” he says. “We printed programs, fixture cards and internal school stationary with some invention.”

Wearing also began teaching individual students at woodturning. “A Chinese girl excelled at this and sent home to her father a pivoting dressing table mirror in English oak with sycamore inlay stringing,” he says. “It arrived intact at Kuda Lampung in Indonesia. He wrote to the headmaster for confirmation that this was made by his daughter, not her teacher. His letter was passed on to me. I was able to confirm and sent a color photograph of her at work on the mirror.”

While teaching Wearing says he made few pieces for clients, who, he says, generally wanted bespoke furniture for factory-made prices.

scan_1

Wearing excelled as a teacher, and a writer. There’s an ease to which he describes the craft, in words both spoken and written. “Writing is not difficult if you know your stuff and have the opportunity to see your pupils or readers at work,” he says. “My education in English as a boy and as a student was good.”

As for the art of teaching? “The key is conversation,” Wearing says. “Did you ever have a conversation with, say, your math teacher? Children are not good at talking to strange adults, generally because they have nothing to say.” In the workshop, though, Wearing says talking is key. “This is an unnoticed service which the workshop supplies training in conversation skills.”

Wearing found his life purpose after WWII, when his old headmaster suggested teaching craftsmanship. And it’s a vocation he’s enjoyed for more than 50 years. “You must really know your stuff and have a job on the go,” Wearing says. “A head of department told me he never made anything and had no tools but used school tools. Can you imagine a violin teacher who never played for his pleasure and had no violin, but used a school instrument? Or a physical education teacher who had no football boots and could not swim?”

Wearing spent his career not only teaching but also writing about the craft, in magazine articles and books. After owning several cameras, he decided to build one specifically for the technical subjects he was writing about. “This produced 3-1/2” x 2-1/2” color transparencies of good quality,” he says. “Editors liked them so much that they increased my fee. Then disaster struck — digital. Everything had to be digital and I couldn’t make a digital camera.”

Wearing has written a number of books, all now considered classics. They include “Making Woodwork Aids & Devices”, “Hand Tools for Woodworkers: Principles & Techniques” and “The Resourceful Woodworker: Tools, Techniques and Tricks of the Trade”.

In 1988 Wearing published “The Essential Woodworker” with Batsford. For Christopher Schwarz, this book, which he bought on a whim for about $5 in the 1990s, was deeply influential in his study of the craft. “I read the entire book in one siting (it took only a couple hours), but in that short period of time, Wearing assembled all the random puzzle pieces I had collected for years about handwork,” Schwarz wrote in 2010. “He filled in all the missing details about dozens of basic processes, from laying out door joinery to truing up the legs on a table.”

Although it took several years, Schwarz and John Hoffman reprinted the out-of-print book in 2010, and consider it still one of the best books on hand-tool usage written in the post-Charles Hayward era today.

Wearing’s conversation with me was via mail, in handwritten form. He ends his letter with an anecdote:

“I was working one evening when two boys passed the workshop; (it was a boarding school). They saw the lights on and came in. They asked, ‘What are you doing?’ ‘I am going to glue up a drawer.’ ‘Can we watch?’ ‘No.’ Their faces fell. ‘But you can help.’ They found and adjusted the cramps, made and fitted the cramping blocks, tested the diagonals and tested for twist, applied the glue and cramped up. Then we left. Next day they came in and asked, ‘How did it go?’ ‘Have a look it’s under the dust sheet over there.’ They tried the drawer, pushed it in and out, tried it upside down, saying ‘That’s fabulous.’ I said ‘No, that is how it should be and you can do the same if you take care and follow my instructions.’”

For teacher and pupil, a lesson should be an enjoyable, purposeful activity.

Indeed.


Filed under: The Essential Woodworker, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Joined chest class

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 7:47am

This past weekend was the wrap-up to the joined chest class at Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/ One weekend a month, for five months, with homework is a tall order.

chest-frontMatt’s chest front assembled

In addition to the outlay of cash, these students made the commitment of time – that is really striking to me. I appreciate them signing on for this class, and Bob Van Dyke for making it possible. We had some struggles, mostly related to wood supply; and also had a lot of fun making these chests. When I was a student many years ago, Jennie Alexander used to have us all make the same ladderback chair in the class, there was no deviation. I remember once JA suggested just making the chairs, piling them in a heap, and each student taking one home. That didn’t fly, but it illustrated the general notion of a class project.

carvingRick doing more carving

My workshops are usually nothing like that. I seem to be dumb enough to say to each student, yea – you could add this or that, make this change – why not carve the side frames and panels – so there’s a lot of variation in these projects. And because of the amount of work involved, each student was at a different point in their chest. The way the class worked, I’d cover two topics each weekend,  – layout, joinery/carving, decoration/tills, floors, etc.

Then I’d wander from bench to bench to see where the students were, and what they needed. In between classes, I’d often send them blog posts that served as notes for what we just did, or what was coming up. When it ran smoothly anyway…here’s pictures. Some awful. some ok.

detailmolded edge, peg holes. panel

A pile of chest parts; ready for test-fitting

stack-of-chest

White balance out the window – but framed now, & panels cut to size.

frame

Stock prep. Dwight lays his planes on their sides, I see.

stock-prep

what are these guys doing rooting around in my chest?

thieves

Oh, trying to suss out the till lid scenario.

tills

Tidy bevels on panels.

beveled-panels

Rick’s tool box – dynamite from 30 Rockefeller Plaza.

tool-box

Pine lid installed

lid

Back home in daylight again. Started linseed oil. A few moldings left, some drawer pulls & done. then it goes to Fuller Craft Museum for the exhibition about Plymouth CRAFT.

daylight-again

I have two more oak classes at CVSWW – a weekend of carving in May, and later in the fall, a 4-day class in making a carved oak box. Link at the top. Box dates aren’t set yet, but I think it will be late September or early October. I forget…

 


“Craftsmanship is Risk” Sticker Now Available!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 7:08am

The new sticker just arrived in the mail yesterday. This 4.25” x 2.75” sticker features the same Roman woodworker that is on our new t-shirt (which is still being shipped for free through this Friday, by the way). The sticker is $3 in our store. It seems to be an item folks like throwing into the cart with DVDs or mags that they order. If you’re not looking to order anything else, we’ll still take orders for just a sticker.

 But what does “Craftsmanship is Risk” mean, exactly?

 It’s not news that the term “workmanship of risk” has made David Pye famous in woodworking circles. The term was coined by Pye in the mid 20th century to describe workmanship that depends on the skill of the maker rather than complex jigs which ensure “perfection”. This is seen mostly clearly in tools like hatchets, chisels, and even to some degree hand planes.

This concept has been passed around woodworking circles for years but what is less known is that Pye developed the term as a definition for the word “craftsmanship”. On page 20 of his Nature and Art of Workmanship, he writes,

“If I must ascribe meaning to the word craftsmanship, I shall say as a first approximation that it means simply workmanship using any kind of technique or apparatus, in which the quality of the result is not predetermined, but depends on the judgment, dexterity, and care which the maker exercises as he works. The essential idea is that the quality of the result is continually at risk during the process of making; and so I shall call this kind of workmanship ‘The Workmanship of Risk’: an uncouth phrase, but at least descriptive.”

We think seeing the essence of craft bound up with the “riskiness” of working with unregulated tools is a dead on. There is a lot of skillful workmanship in the world but the one that we at M&T particularly want to celebrate is the one called “craftsmanship”.

This sticker is for those who want to celebrate handcraft and know we are part of a rich tradition of woodworking passed down from our ancestors. This woodworker symbolizes our journey to relearn how to work with our hands by the sweat of our brow.

You can order your sticker here.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

“Craftsmanship is Risk” Sticker Now Available!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 7:08am

The new sticker just arrived in the mail yesterday. This 4.25” x 2.75” sticker features the same Roman woodworker that is on our new t-shirt (which is still being shipped for free through this Friday, by the way). The sticker is $3 in our store. It seems to be an item folks like throwing into the cart with DVDs or mags that they order. If you’re not looking to order anything else, we’ll still take orders for just a sticker.

 But what does “Craftsmanship is Risk” mean, exactly?

 It’s not news that the term “workmanship of risk” has made David Pye famous in woodworking circles. The term was coined by Pye in the mid 20th century to describe workmanship that depends on the skill of the maker rather than complex jigs which ensure “perfection”. This is seen mostly clearly in tools like hatchets, chisels, and even to some degree hand planes.

This concept has been passed around woodworking circles for years but what is less known is that Pye developed the term as a definition for the word “craftsmanship”. On page 20 of his Nature and Art of Workmanship, he writes,

“If I must ascribe meaning to the word craftsmanship, I shall say as a first approximation that it means simply workmanship using any kind of technique or apparatus, in which the quality of the result is not predetermined, but depends on the judgment, dexterity, and care which the maker exercises as he works. The essential idea is that the quality of the result is continually at risk during the process of making; and so I shall call this kind of workmanship ‘The Workmanship of Risk’: an uncouth phrase, but at least descriptive.”

We think seeing the essence of craft bound up with the “riskiness” of working with unregulated tools is a dead on. There is a lot of skillful workmanship in the world but the one that we at M&T particularly want to celebrate is the one called “craftsmanship”.

This sticker is for those who want to celebrate handcraft and know we are part of a rich tradition of woodworking passed down from our ancestors. This woodworker symbolizes our journey to relearn how to work with our hands by the sweat of our brow.

You can order your sticker here.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Handsaws 101 with Ron Herman – 360w360 E.221

360 WoodWorking - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 4:00am
Handsaws 101 with Ron Herman – 360w360 E.221

In this episode of 360 with 360WoodWorking the 360 guys talk handsaws 101 with Ron Herman

Join the guys twice each week for six lively minutes of discussion on everything from tools to techniques to wood selection (and more). Chuck & Glen, and sometimes a surprise guest, all have their own opinions. Sometimes they agree and sometimes they don’t, but the conversation is always information packed and lots of fun.

If you have topics you’d like to hear covered in future episodes, click here to send an email to the guys.

Continue reading Handsaws 101 with Ron Herman – 360w360 E.221 at 360 WoodWorking.

I missed it.....

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 12:35am
Super Bowl LI was a record setter and I slept right through it. I tried to stay awake but the last thing I remember seeing was less than two minutes to go in the first quarter. My team won in spite of me not seeing it and Tom Terrific Brady went nutso on Atlanta in the second half.  He had a lot of help from the rest of the team but he was the general directing the battle. I couldn't watch the highlights at work so I'll be doing that before I hit the rack tonight.

Next year, regardless of who is playing, I'll take the following monday off to watch it.

I had to make a couple of pit stops on the way home tonight. I was in and out real quick and I didn't lose too much time. I had to stop at Shaws to get milk and the liquor store to get a bottle of tequila. That is for a friend of mine and it's supposedly in the top 3 tequilas in the world. I hope that he likes it because I don't know the difference between it or a glass of water.

came in the mail today
Can you guess what they are?

the give away
a pair of chopsticks
Ken Hatch offered to make a pair and I accepted. I was not expecting two sets of them nor to have a fancy pouch for each of them. The maple ones on the left will be my saturday chinese take out eating sticks. The padauk ones on the right will be for looking at only (for now). My wife doesn't eat chinese and I'm sure she would frown on trying eat anything with chopsticks. Maybe when the girls come to visit one of them can use these. Thanx so much for the gift Ken

the tequila
I almost had an involuntary bowel movement when I saw the price of this.  But friends are worth it I think. Of course I'll have to make a box to put this in to give it to him.

too big for the one I just made (box #1)
A quick visual check of box #2 and I saw that one is too small. This sounds a bit like the Goldilocks story. I'll be making a box that will be just right.

my newest molder
Josh wasn't woofing when he said this was a better plane. It was made by Wallace of Montreal and I'm wondering how it got out of Canada without Bob Demers snagging it first. This will mold 1/2" stock and molders in this size are very hard to come by.

one of my absolute favorite profiles
Josh says that it is a fenced 1/2" casing plane. I call it a round over with a shoulder.

of course I had to try it out
This is a piece of 1/2" poplar that will be the test drive board.

wow and wow again
Silky smooth planing action and look at those ribbon like shavings. This type of plane doesn't have a stop or at least it didn't stop for me. Long after I got the profile, I was still taking full length shavings with no feedback telling me I was close to stopping.

done
This profile is clean and smooth from end to end. This would look great on the edge of a bookshelf or a box lid.

bigger siblings
These profiles are similar to the 1/2" one. Both of these are for 3/4" thick stock and neither one makes a shoulder.

box has set up
used this to hog most of the waste off
used the small block plane to flush it
errant chisel work
I was following a grain line when I cleaned this up with a chisel. By the time I realized that it was too late. I'll be gluing a shim in here.

front half pin gap
I would not be gluing a shim in here if I had marked the bottom edge as my reference. I saved the pieces that I cut for adding the filler to box #1 and I'll use one of them here..

zona saw kerf
The thinnest piece I have is too thick for the zona saw kerf
gents saw
This kerf and my carcass saw kerf were both too thin for the shim. I used my violin plane to shave the shim until it fit.

fits now
opposite side is iffy looking
This side closed up some but not completely. I opened it with my carcass saw and glued a shim in there too.

pretty good
I eyeballed this for square and chopped it with a chisel. I checked it and I think it's good enough to use as is.

1x6 by 1/2" pine
I'll use this for making the box for the tequila. This is something that I'll have to whack out before my 'honey-do' project.

two choices for the lid
Both are glued up to make them wider and I don't like using glued up stock for lids. Of the two, I like the right better because it has a lighter color.

sometimes you get lucky
The glue line is almost a 1/4" past the groove. I should be able to saw this on the waste side of the glue line and plane down to it. It looks like this box will have a one piece board for a lid after all.

the honey-do
This is what she wants me to reproduce. It will become a paper towel holder. I have the cardboard backs from two desk calendars to use to make some patterns. I need one for the sides and one for the crest rail. I think I have some poplar I can use to make this. I would like to use cherry but my wife wants it painted the same color as the spice rack. And I'm not painting cherry for any amount of money.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is the difference between a twit and a twerp?
answer - none, they are both a silly or foolish person

They Actually Do This Stuff For Fun?

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 5:51pm

 

This past weekend I attended the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour as it came through Ellsworth, ME. The guys I’ve gone with for years always choose the ‘extreme sports’ night over the ‘culture’ night. Every year, we watch people climb rock faces in snowstorms, kayak off of waterfalls, and trek across barren wilderness just for the thrill of it. It’s wild stuff. I can appreciate it from a distance but it’s hard for me to relate to because I spent most of my childhood in art classes when everyone else was playing football. 

Every year, though, I can’t help but think about what it is that motivates a person to push themselves that hard and take that much risk. Is it nothing more than an adrenaline rush? Maybe they’ve just got to see the unique vantage point of the summit? Or is it simply grasping for bragging rights to be the new record-holder?

I don’t think so.

Almost without exception, these films all spend a bit of time looking at the motivation behind these adventures. These athletes push themselves further, taking on greater and greater challenges, because it brings an incomparable sense of accomplishment. The frostbite, the broken fingers, the near-death falls… none of that is worth enduring if all they’re after is the view from the summit. It’s precisely the hardships of the journey that make the trip worth it. It makes them feel alive. For them, those adventures prove to be the most fulfilling experiences they can imagine. (For more discussion on motivation in work see this excellent TED Talk by Dan Ariely.)

As I’ve reflected on this, I thought about how the rest of us might relate to this in some sense. Even if risking life and limb is out of the question, we all grow when pushing ourselves to accomplish what appears out of reach. Some of you are runners. You pound your feet on the pavement for miles, sweat dripping down your head until your knees get wobbly and you are exhausted. It feels good to push yourself. Some of you go the gym for this exercise. Maybe, for you, a simple walk in the woods pushes you outside your comfort zone. Whatever that is for you, I think we all can relate to the need to challenge ourselves.

For me, the adventure is craft-oriented. Building furniture with hand tools is the right balance of physical exertion and creative action for an art nerd like myself. I’m not much of an athlete and extreme heights give me the willies but when I pick up that saw and begin to break down rough-sawn boards for a project, my heart beats faster. And it not just the physical exertion - The thrill I get from working wood in the way artisans have for thousands of years before me is unlike anything else I’ve experienced. It makes me feel alive to work with my hands and it makes them come to life for me. I’ve found that connecting to a community of artisans that spans all generations is way more fulfilling than trying to get creative energy by ‘looking within’ like I did in my art classes.

Even though the labor involved in planing boards is not even remotely comparable to climbing a mountain, I feel a similar sort of accomplishment as I begin to see furniture take shape. The vivid memory of hand planing every component and handsawing every joint is satisfying to me in a way machining wood isn’t. (For more on this topic, see our Apprenticeship ‘Foundations’ video.)

So maybe that’s not your thing. Maybe you don’t work wood for those reasons. Maybe you’re in the business and need to keep an eye on the bottom line. I won’t deny that machines can free craftsmen from the drudgery of production settings. For me though, I work wood because I seek the adventure and fulfillment of the journey. Every time I look at a piece I made, I remember the process because I can still read it on the surface. The tool marks are like my photos from the summit – they forever testify to the ascent.

Why am I so into hand tools? It’s not purist elitism and it’s not for some zen-like meditation.

I love the adventure of hand tools simply because I find it thrilling to work with my hands. This is a journey machines have never been able to take me on. I’ve discussed this approach in the manifesto in Issue One and time has only confirmed my conviction.

 - Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

They Actually Do This Stuff For Fun?

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 5:51pm

 

This past weekend I attended the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour as it came through Ellsworth, ME. The guys I’ve gone with for years always choose the ‘extreme sports’ night over the ‘culture’ night. Every year, we watch people climb rock faces in snowstorms, kayak off of waterfalls, and trek across barren wilderness just for the thrill of it. It’s wild stuff. I can appreciate it from a distance but it’s hard for me to relate to because I spent most of my childhood in art classes when everyone else was playing football. 

Every year, though, I can’t help but think about what it is that motivates a person to push themselves that hard and take that much risk. Is it nothing more than an adrenaline rush? Maybe they’ve just got to see the unique vantage point of the summit? Or is it simply grasping for bragging rights to be the new record-holder?

I don’t think so.

Almost without exception, these films all spend a bit of time looking at the motivation behind these adventures. These athletes push themselves further, taking on greater and greater challenges, because it brings an incomparable sense of accomplishment. The frostbite, the broken fingers, the near-death falls… none of that is worth enduring if all they’re after is the view from the summit. It’s precisely the hardships of the journey that make the trip worth it. It makes them feel alive. For them, those adventures prove to be the most fulfilling experiences they can imagine. (For more discussion on motivation in work see this excellent TED Talk by Dan Ariely.)

As I’ve reflected on this, I thought about how the rest of us might relate to this in some sense. Even if risking life and limb is out of the question, we all grow when pushing ourselves to accomplish what appears out of reach. Some of you are runners. You pound your feet on the pavement for miles, sweat dripping down your head until your knees get wobbly and you are exhausted. It feels good to push yourself. Some of you go the gym for this exercise. Maybe, for you, a simple walk in the woods pushes you outside your comfort zone. Whatever that is for you, I think we all can relate to the need to challenge ourselves.

For me, the adventure is craft-oriented. Building furniture with hand tools is the right balance of physical exertion and creative action for an art nerd like myself. I’m not much of an athlete and extreme heights give me the willies but when I pick up that saw and begin to break down rough-sawn boards for a project, my heart beats faster. And it not just the physical exertion - The thrill I get from working wood in the way artisans have for thousands of years before me is unlike anything else I’ve experienced. It makes me feel alive to work with my hands and it makes them come to life for me. I’ve found that connecting to a community of artisans that spans all generations is way more fulfilling than trying to get creative energy by ‘looking within’ like I did in my art classes.

Even though the labor involved in planing boards is not even remotely comparable to climbing a mountain, I feel a similar sort of accomplishment as I begin to see furniture take shape. The vivid memory of hand planing every component and handsawing every joint is satisfying to me in a way machining wood isn’t. (For more on this topic, see our Apprenticeship ‘Foundations’ video.)

So maybe that’s not your thing. Maybe you don’t work wood for those reasons. Maybe you’re in the business and need to keep an eye on the bottom line. I won’t deny that machines can free craftsmen from the drudgery of production settings. For me though, I work wood because I seek the adventure and fulfillment of the journey. Every time I look at a piece I made, I remember the process because I can still read it on the surface. The tool marks are like my photos from the summit – they forever testify to the ascent.

Why am I so into hand tools? It’s not purist elitism and it’s not for some zen-like meditation.

I love the adventure of hand tools simply because I find it thrilling to work with my hands. This is a journey machines have never been able to take me on. I’ve discussed this approach in the manifesto in Issue One and time has only confirmed my conviction.

 - Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

Storefront Open this Saturday

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 4:31pm

vegas_img_6959

The Lost Art Press storefront will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, with John, Raney and me dressed as our favorite Pokemon. Later, there will be a magic show.

We’ll also have books – our entire line – plus a bunch of blemished books for 50 percent off retail (cash only on blems). We also have some extra T-shirts (all unworn and maggot-free) that have been returned to us at big savings.

You can also come check out my new basement. During the last couple weeks the dirt-floored cellar has been dug out. Workers have installed a drainage system in case it ever floods (we’ve not seen any water in 18 months). Right now they are pouring a concrete floor so I will have something I’ve never had before: A place to store lumber.

cellar_img_7213 cellar2_img_7210

Because of our tight quarters in our old house, I’ve always been a “just in time” lumber guy. The approach has its advantages, but there have been times I’ve declined to snatch up some incredible lumber. No more. The new basement will be humidity- and temperature-controlled and dedicated to wood.

I’m also in the throes of building some new chair designs. Some are working. Some aren’t. And you can help me chop up the failures and burn them.

As always, we offer you these open days as a place to come visit, hang out and ask any questions. We’re happy to point you to good food and drink and demonstrate anything from our books that is vexing.

During the last few open days, we’ve had people from as far away as Utah, Austin, Atlanta and elsewhere stop in with their spouses. Covington and Cincinnati are great cities with lots of stuff to do, an endless list of good food (especially if you like pork) and culture. And it’s a cheap trip.

The next open house (March 11) will correspond with a massive Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event at Braxton Brewing down the street from us. We’re planning stuff and hope to have some details in the next week or so.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Lost Art Press Storefront, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Another Dresser Turned Wine Cabinet

MVFlaim Furnituremaker - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 4:26pm

Last year my wife and I bought an old dresser at an antique show in Columbus, Ohio. We had a spot in our dining room we wanted to make into a bar area and the dresser was small enough that it would fit nicely in that spot.

 photo cabinet.jpg

I had to remove the drawers to make room for the wine bottle storage I was going to build so, I cut off the rail and drawer runners that were between the two drawers.

 photo IMG_20170106_164811_784.jpg

The dresser was old and someone in the past tried to repair the case by driving nails through the side of the case into the end grain of the tenon. I took the tenon out and drove the nails back out through the side.

 photo IMG_20170106_173116_056.jpg

After the nails were gone, I glued the case back together to make everything sturdy and square.

 photo 20170106_174530.jpg

The cabinet was going to be painted so, I bought some birch plywood and cut up pieces to make a box that would slide inside the case. I also trimmed the edges of the plywood with oak to match the rest of the case.

 photo IMG_20170107_181424_519.jpg

The old dresser had a bit of detail to the rails that I wanted to match on the box I was building.

 photo 20170107_165751.jpg

I took my No 8 hollow molding plane and planed a shallow recess down the middle and rounded over the sides with my block plane.

 photo IMG_20170108_125824_574.jpg

I had to carefully build the box to fit inside the case. It needed to be loose to slide in, but not too big that it wouldn’t fit. I made the box an 1/8″ smaller than the length and height of the opening of the case so that it would fit. I used simple rabbet joinery to join the sides together and a dado down the middle for the divider.

 photo 20170108_142721.jpg

The moment of truth. After building the box I prayed that it would slide in the case. Thankfully it did.

 photo 20170108_152110.jpg

My wife painted the case with black milk paint. She also sanded and stained the top and drawers with a gel stain. I then applied two coats of Waterlox varnish on the top and drawers.

 photo IMG_20170112_160845_049.jpg

I wanted the left side to hold wine bottles so, I built diagonal grid out of solid oak and used dadoes for joinery so that the other side of the grid would slide through. This too had to be fitted carefully so that it wasn’t too tight to slide in. After everything fitted well, I took it out, stained and applied Waterlox varnish to the grid.

 photo 20170112_172051.jpg

Here’s the final cabinet sitting in the same spot. We removed one shelf as we felt the wine glasses hung a little too low. The cabinet came out well and was dirt cheap to build.


Lay Out a D-shaped Seat

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 1:38pm

One of the classic shapes for the seats of chairs or stools is the D shape. If you make or appreciate Welsh chairs (like I do), it’s a shape you see a lot. Yet many beginning chairmakers fret over making a D-shaped seat of their own dimensions. I admit that when I started making chairs, I was similarly befuddled and preferred to trace the shapes of old seats or work […]

The post Lay Out a D-shaped Seat appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Markneukirchen guitar

Finely Strung - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 10:22am

This charming little guitar came into the workshop recently. The tightly arched back had come away from the linings in a couple of places at the edges of the upper bout and needed re-gluing. I also made a new saddle to replace the existing poorly-fitting piece of plastic and fitted a set of new strings. Otherwise, the guitar was in remarkably good condition for its age.

 
p1060324-edit
 

The label inside the guitar attributes it to Adolf Kessler junior of Markneukirchen, where it was probably made in the last part of the 19th century.

The Musical Instrument Museum in Markneukirchen has an on-line forum where I discovered that Adolf Kessler had founded a mail order business there in 1886, selling guitars and violins. I guess Kessler was a business man who marketed instruments made by some of the many craftsmen working in the town at the time. There’s a short BBC film about Markneukirchen and its 400 year history as a centre of musical instrument manufacture here.

 
p1060332
 

The rosette is made from decorative shapes of mother of pearl set into mastic.

 
p1060336
 

The ribs and back are of plain wood, perhaps maple, with a painted faux grain pattern under the varnish.

 
p1060329
 

The ebonised bridge is neatly carved into fleurs de lys at the ends, although the bass side has sustained some damage.

 
p1060335
 

The headstock carries Stauffer style tuning machines.

 
p1060326
 

Altogether an attractive little instrument – and I’m pleased to think that it is ready to make music again.

Dear Tool Manufacturer…

The English Woodworker - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 9:25am
Dear Tool Manufacturer…

…why can’t you make thick irons laminated?

Why is it that my Grandad doesn’t grind. My Dad doesn’t have a grinder. And up until me buying swanky tools, I never had to grind?

Hard steels and thick irons.

It’s a combination which wasn’t found in my Grandad’s workshop.
And that thick hard steel takes some going to wear through.  So out comes the grinder.

This modern ‘improvement’ to our irons puts a spanner in the works of any old school sharpening routine.

Continue reading at The English Woodworker.

Categories: Hand Tools

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