Hand Tool Headlines

The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

 

Be sure to visit the Hand Tool Headlines section - scores of my favorite woodworking blogs in one place.  Also, take note of Norse Woodsmith's latest feature, an Online Store, which contains only products I personally recommend.  It is secure and safe, and is powered by Amazon.

Search

Hand Tools

Finishing Lies

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 12:49pm

paint_IMG_3483

  1. Covers in one coat
  2. Protects from inside the wood
  3. Stain and polyurethane in one step
  4. No harsh fumes – strips multiple layers
  5. Danish Oil (ask the Danes about this finish)
  6. Spar varnish – exceptional protection from sunlight, rain & moisture
  7. You must finish both sides of a panel
  8. Perfect results every time
  9. No-fail finish
  10. No need to sand between coats.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Finishing, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Spring Ritual – Hydro System Tune-up

The Barn on White Run - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 10:51am

With the passing of winter (fingers crossed) and the hydroelectric system de-mothballed, I undertook my annual ritual of tuning up both ends of the penstock, or pipeline that carries the water from the small dam at the top to the turbine at the bottom.

My first big upgrade a few years ago was to swap out the original four large capacity Tractor-trailer deep cycle batteries for four ultra-mega high performance deep cycle batteries for storing the generated electricity.  Each of the new batteries has the capacity of the entire previous battery bank, so with this step I increased my power storage 16-fold.  BTW each of the new batteries weighs 192 pounds, and these are the largest capacity 12v batteries available in the US.

A couple years ago I swapped out the rock-and-concrete catching dam at the edge of the property for a rock-and-sandbag one three hundred feet closer.  I did this to save myself the intense maintenance involved in that last hundred yards of run which provided only another ten feet of drop.  It just was not worth the added effort, being more than 25% of the penstock maintenance for a return of about 8% in the power output.  Besides, the new site was perhaps the nicest narrowing of the creek with a huge rock on one bank and a great source of stacking rocks for the other.

Once again this year my debris filter needed replacing, something I will just have to plan in doing every other Spring unless I can find some stainless steel 1/4″ hardware cloth.

It only takes me four or five minutes to make a new one, and it swaps out with the older one in about fifteen seconds.  I spend way more time walking up to the site and anything else.

On the bottom end of the penstock I also refined some revisions I’d made in previous years.  The turbine came with three graduated fixed nozzles when I bought it, 1/4″, 5/16″, and 3/8″, to provide for a nearly infinite variability in the system flow control.  This required pipe fittings leading the three high-pressure hoses going to each of the nozzles, and the Y-pipe fittings were a maintenance headache.  Previously I’d cut the options down to two nozzles and their fittings, but I realized that the only one I really needed was the largest one and reconfigured the routing again.

Now it’s just a straight shot leading to a single hose and nozzle.

The output of the hydro system is running about 10-12 kwh per day, which is way more than I need for most any day.  Even running a planer for three hours or the wax cookers all day is no problem, especially on a sunny day when the solar panels kick in another 8-10 kwh.

My next system projects are to build a heavy-mass turbine housing to dampen the whine of the turbine, which interferes with the gurgling of the stream, and build a new powerhouse for all the electronics inherent in the system..

again big sash masur birch - wieder zapfensäge Maserbirke

Two Lawyers Toolworks - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 8:39am
Sash saw Mkarelian masur birch 14" 11 tpi with a new background for pictures Zapfensäge karelische Maserbirke 350mm 11 tpi jetzt mit neuem Fotohintergrund   Pedderhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12692353908068506678noreply@blogger.com0
Categories: Hand Tools

working the plate rail.......

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 12:41am
Worked on the plate rail tonight but not because I forgot about the bookcase. I had been thinking about it today on when to drill for the shelf pin sleeves. Do it now and risk not getting the bookcase square or do it after the bookcase is glued? I can see plusses and minuses for both and I got time to pick one. Tonight was for working on finalizing the plate rail details.

got the corbels done
The first two from the left are slightly different. The first one has a flat where it meets the bottom molding and the second one doesn't. The one with the flat was done to fit the space between the top rail and the bottom molding.  Overall I'm satisfied with the sizes of the individual parts except for the bottom molding. That one is too thick and I think something a 1/2" thick would look better.

too thick and I don't like the profile
I planed a cove on this and it did nothing for me. I then put a small round over on the on the top of it to soften it and I still didn't like it.

this looks much better to me
This is a 1/2" thick piece of pine that I planed a bead on the edge. It's too wide but I do like how it looks for the bottom molding.

the scale of the new molding is a better fit here
I wish this rabbet was larger
Being larger would make the shadow line of this stand out. It wouldn't be obscured once it gets painted.

the plane I used to make the bead
I can take the two fences off of the plane and that would allow me to make a deeper bead but I am not sure if it would make the rabbet wider. I like the bead and that stays and I may have to just accept the size of the rabbet.

my smallest hollow
I think I got this nomenclature correct. A hollow makes a round profile and the round makes a circular hollow. I tried to round over the top of the bead to remove the square edge but the results sucked. The hollow may have worked if it was smaller but this one didn't make a round over but instead made a chamfer. I ended up doing it with a block plane.

I tried
I used a bullnose plane to try to increase the rabbet and all I did was to chew it up. It is not easy trying to start the plane on such a small rabbet.

did kind of ok on the far end
test run for the plate groove
My smallest hollow is a #5 which I think is too big but I'm going to try it anyways. I nailed the wood strip to guide the hollow so I'll have a straight groove.

big number 5
nail holes won't be a problem
The plate rail is going to be painted so once the holes are filled, they won't be seen once the paint goes on.


groove is way too big
from Bob Demers
I will need a #1 hollow to make my plate groove. I've read that the small H&R mouths are prone to chipping and breaking out. I forgot I had this attached to one of the 6 cabinet tool doors.

haven't used any of these for quite a long time
1/4" veining router bit
I bought this many, many lunar eclipses ago to do plate rail grooves.  I don't think that I used it more than 3 or 4 times. I may have to use it for the 5th time to do these plate rails.

I quit here because I had to go to the bank. I forgot my PIN for my ATM and I got locked out after 3 invalid tries so I need the bank to reset it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
The Panama Canal has 12 locks. The Suez Canal is twice as long and it has how many locks?
answer - none

More on Mary Rose Treasures

Paul Sellers - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 1:42pm

Monday 17th April 2017 It would be too much to blog on the shipwright’s work when the ship is so large. Boats would be much easier. It wasn’t in any way nostalgia that called me to visit Portsmouth nor anything to do with a nautical life on the open sea. It was wood and its …

Read the full post More on Mary Rose Treasures on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Goin’ Hollywood

The Barn on White Run - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 7:55am

Last month I was visited by Joshua Farnsworth, Ray Pine, and George Lott, for a wonderful day of fellowship, filming, and yakking about woodworking and rural living.

Joshua shot a bunch of video to be edited and compiled and the first one was posted last night.  You can find it here.  Clearly I have a face for radio and a voice for writing.

In Praise of Knots, the Defect that is Watching You

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 7:37am

When I went to the lumberyard to buy the stock for my first project of my own design I picked through the store’s entire stack of 1x12s to find the boards with the most attractive constellation of knots. I wasn’t trying to be cheeky or make a statement (other than “I like knots”). I genuinely liked knots because they reminded me that the board was once a tree – not […]

The post In Praise of Knots, the Defect that is Watching You appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Don Williams’ Amazing Off-Grid Timber Frame Barn Workshop (Part 1)

Wood and Shop - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 6:40am
  In this video & article, Don Williams shares a tour of his timber frame barn woodworking workshop in the mountains of Highland County, Virginia. And yes, he bought his 4 story timber frame barn on eBay...I'll explain in more detail below. I first met Don Williams several years

New Shop Lights & Hiding Your Nails on Mouldings

The Renaissance Woodworker - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 6:28am

Seek Out the Deep Dark Corners of Your Moulding

This week I show off my new track lighting and smart bulbs in my shop. For me these lights serve 2 masters: woodshop and film studio. So my set up may be a bit different than a lot of you, but embracing task lighting over banks of fluorescent lights is a major step forward for any hand tool shop.

Then I answer a question about nailing moulding to a case and how to hide the nails so you don’t have to mess with wood putty that usually makes things more obvious.

Categories: Hand Tools

Hewing Wooden Bowls

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 5:34am

I’m getting ready to go over to Southbridge, Massachusetts for Fine Woodworking Live http://www.finewoodworkinglive.com/  but in the meantime, Lie-Nielsen just posted a preview of my new video on hewing wooden bowls. I copied it here, in case anyone would like to see what this video covers. I still have some available:  https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/new-dvds-carved-oak-boxes-hewing-wooden-bowls-spring-2017/  and they have the rest https://www.lie-nielsen.com/nodes/4243/home-education-videos

 

 


Portable workbench part one

Oregon Woodworker - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 5:32am
With the kitchen remodel finally done, I was looking forward to getting back in the shop. Thinking about what my next project would be I remembered how much I wished I had been able to do some woodworking during our recent camping trip to Tucson.  I had such a great time woodworking while camping at Trillium Lake last fall, I want to do it more.  Then it hit me:  I wanted to build a combination portable work bench and tool chest that would fit snugly in our SUV along with our dog, camping gear and everything else we travel with.  Now, some of my brainstorms work out and some are flops, which is part and parcel of creativity, but I have a very good feeling about this one.

The first issue was what material to use.  I wanted to use douglas-fir, but most of what you find around here is days from harvest and so green it literally drips.  The big boxes sell kiln dried 2x material as "whitewood" so they can use different species.  Usually it is hemlock, which is unsuitable for a workbench, but I checked and it happened to be douglas-fir that day.  I sorted through the pile and found half a dozen studs that were sorta rift sawn and had clear sections.  So, together with scraps left over from the kitchen remodel, I had my materials for a grand total of less than $18.



The first step was laminating the top.  I settled on a length of 34 inches and the width of four 2x4s, which turned out to be 13 inches after jointing off the rounded edges.  At this point I got a nice surprise.  In the past I have flattened panels with a jack plane, but a while back I heavily cambered the blade of an extra #4 to make it a dedicated scrub plane.  This was the first time I had used it and I couldn't believe how much easier it was.


I was able to flatten both sides in about twenty minutes and, after smoothing it out with old #7 I had a top that is a strong 1 3/8" thick:


Now I need a base that will also function as a case for the toolbox.
Categories: Hand Tools

Fully expecting that the Hardwood Derby at Fine Woodworking Live...

Giant Cypress - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 3:49am


Fully expecting that the Hardwood Derby at Fine Woodworking Live will be as entertaining as this. Be sure to watch through to the end.

Happy Friday!

Master of Nothing

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 3:00am

gateleg_IMG_7911

One of the common criticisms I hear of North American woodworkers is that we try to do so many things – casework, carving, veneering, chairmaking, turning – that we never become good at any one of those things.

There’s truth to the criticism. When I work side-by-side with traditionally trained European woodworkers, they beat the pants off me (speed-wise). German, English and Swiss joiners can cut dovetails and assemble casework much faster than I can.

I do get a small measure of revenge when I pick up a turning tool without a second thought to make a leg or knob. Most of them have never touched a lathe, worked with green timber, dealt with compound-angle wet/dry chair joints or carved even a simple detail.

Maybe it’s the frontier blood in our veins or the fact that our society never embraced the European apprentice system for woodworking. There was just too much work to do, not enough people to do it and not enough time to train people in that manner. Heck, most North Americans I know are one or two generations removed from our subsistence farming ancestors.

At times I wish our history was different. I covet the pure European skill when I watch people from the French schools, for example, make astonishing chairs with ease. Or when I watch German carvers at work on restoring a cathedral. Or English joiners making ridiculous dovetails. I feel inferior, as if I’ve spent my entire adult life working at the craft and haven’t really gotten anywhere.

And this is the part of the writing arc where I am supposed to say: But we’re great! We get to do so many different things! And blah blah freedom #Murica.

That’s not how I resolve this conflict in my mind. I turn to the parable of the scorpion and the frog, made famous in the movie “The Crying Game.”

A scorpion asks a frog to carry him across the river. But the frog queries: “How do I know you won’t sting me?”

The scorpion replies: “Because if I do, we’ll both die.”

Satisfied, the frog allows the scorpion to hop on his back. Halfway across the river, the scorpion stings the frog. And before they both drown, the frog asks: “Why?”

“It’s in my nature,” replies the scorpion.

Sometimes I ponder my 11-year-old self. Would I have signed onto a seven-year apprenticeship at a technical academy if it were offered? It’s an unanswerable, navel-gazing question, and so I pick up a saw and get back to cutting some tenons. And so should you.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Personal Favorites, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Starrett 1895-1948

Journeyman's Journal - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 2:28am

starrett 1895

starrett 1938

starrett 1948

starrett no.16 supplement

This is the last of the catalogues I’m going to post unless I find one dated back to the 18th century which I don’t even know if they actually had toolmakers who made tools as a business. Generally woodworkers and blacksmiths made tools for themselves and the latter for woodworkers.  Anyhow, I feel the catalogues I posted is more than enough.


Categories: Hand Tools

Dutch tool chest build 3, fallfront and the shavings deflector.

Mulesaw - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 12:28am
The panel for the fall front need something to keep it straight, and also something to catch the lower lip of the carcase. It seems as the traditional way of doing this is to attach a couple of battens using nails.
Another method that involves just a little bit more work is to insert some battens in sliding dovetails.
Now there is a plane that is designed for that specific purpose, but mine is at home, so I had to do it with my smoothing plane instead which means that my battens visually taper and don't cover the line up as they would have if I made them the other way.
Since this isn't a show surface it will be just fine.

A narrow board was divided to form two wedges. The surfaces were cleaned up with the plane. Each of the edges were planed at an angle, so the end of each wedge resembled had a trapezoidal shape.

I marked out where I wanted the pieces to go and clamped down the first wedge. Using itself as a guide, I sawed along its edge using my small dozuki. When I had reached my intended depth I loosened the clamp and shifted the wedge a bit to saw the other side of the dovetail dado.
Once the sawing was completed I removed the material with a chisel.
A router plane would have been the obvious choice, but the body of my small homemade one is so narrow that it would fall into the dado. And a chisel does the job fast and well enough in this case.

The wedge was marked out so I could saw off the lower part of the wedge, to enable the protruding end to grip behind the lower front lip. Finally the edges were chamfered with a chisel and the wedge installed.
The second wedge was negotiated in the same way.

A board was split and resawed and planed for making the locking pin. It was cut to length and a hole drilled in the upper part to give something for the fingers to grip when it has to be pulled out.
The bridge shaped piece that will hold the upper part of the fall front was a quick saw and chisel job.

Ralph asked about the shaving deflector for the Stanley No 50 combination plane (mine is actually a Record plane).
As you all know, taking pictures isn't my strongest side, but hopefully the pictures of the deflector mounted in the plane will give a bit of an idea on how it works.
The backside is sloped to match the blade.
The inside is sloped to that the lowest point of the deflector is positioned as far outwards as possible. This slope guides the shaving to the centre of the plane where it can escape without being jammed.


The completed fall front.

Sawing the side of the sliding dovetail dado.

Resawing the locking pin.

Shaving deflector seen from the side of the plane.

Shaving deflector seen from the front.

Shaving deflector seen from the top of the plane.


Categories: Hand Tools

Rare Instrument Makers Plane.

David Barron Furniture - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 12:26am

I've had a request o show some pictures of a tiny instrument makers plane of mine, so I thought I'd share them.

It is just 1 5//8" long and unusually is dovetailed, a real one off.


It has a skewed mouth and was clearly made to be used. Thankfully it's been very well looked after.



Categories: Hand Tools

prototyping two.......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 12:18am
I prototyped two projects tonight and I didn't finish either of them. I got an idea I have to try for one and the other is making the parts into the whole. One prototype is for drilling shelf pin sleeves and that is the one I need to try an idea out on. The other one is my wife's honey-do plate rail and I have to make the parts fit together. It wasn't a wasted night and I'm think I'm headed in the right direction on both of them.

using an off cut
I changed the offset at the front and back. Using 2" put them too close together so I moved the rear to 1 1/2" in from the rabbet and the front is 1 3/4" in from the edge. This spread them out more and I think it will make the shelf more stable and give better support for them.

the first row is easy to do
the throat isn't deep enough for the second row
In order to do the opposite row I would have to flip the board 180 and I lose the registration I had on the first row. I was hoping that I could have drilled one row, put spacer between the fence and the shelf, and drilled the opposite side. This is where plan B was formulated.

the problem
Since I don't see any other way around this I am going to have to drill the two starter holes. Getting these two holes dead nuts on the same square line is imperative.

if I drill one hole off in either direction
all the resultant holes will be off too
That means the two holes, side to side, won't be square and shelf will rock. I think everyone knows how I feel about rocking.

the idea
Make a jig with the two outside bottom holes drilled. Place it on the shelf bottom and drill those two holes. Getting the these two holes square on the jig won't be problem. Getting the jig and those two holes square on the shelf sides will have to be done carefully. Because there is a right and left side and I have to account for that.

my spacer
The dowel will be the same size as the drill bit. The first hole will be drilled by placing the dowel in one of the two starter holes. But before I do that I have to set the distance between the spacer dowel and the drill bit. I will do that by placing a piece of wood 2" wide between the drill bit and the spacer dowel. I'll clamp the spacer fence to the drill press table and then drill a lot of holes.



what I should get
The dowel will be in the starter hole and the first drill press made hole should be 2" from that. All the other holes will be 2" from each other too.

doing the opposite side
I will use the same 2" wide piece of wood to set the dowel and drill bit distance and clamp the fence. Drill the opposite side holes and they should be square to the first set. I don't see any potential hiccups with this other than a bit of repetition. The drill press will give me a consistent depth and a hole square to the face of the side.

switched to the plate rail
I'm using the old kitchen cabinet doors to make the prototype for the plate rail. I lost the drawing my wife made but I got the major parts all here. I didn't do the mitered returns on the end and I'll do that after get the corbels figured out. I made them too large and I'll have to make it smaller. I'm doing one first and I'll use that as the pattern for the others.

a circle isn't going to work
If I try to make a quarter circle, it will match up with the edge of the plate rail but be off on the apron. I will have to draw something freehand here.

used a french curve to draw the arc
The fit is much better here but I will be doing these again.

the wife wants this edge to be rounded over
the clock shelf
I think the clock shelf will need a couple of large corbels or maybe just one in the middle. I rounded the two outside corners on it to be more in tune with the other round parts of plate rail.

top view
I will do the plate rail groove with a hollow and one of the smaller ones I have will work good here. The groove for the plates doesn't have to be much bigger than a 1/4".

I can make this in 5 pieces. A  R and L plate rail with the clock shelf in the middle. A two piece apron that I can butt together by placing it centered under the clock shelf. A corbel placed over it will hide that joint. This is starting to look to be doable.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is a portmanteau?
answer - a large suitcase usually made of leather and opening into two equal parts

Yup, That’s My Mom…

The Furniture Record - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 10:20pm

I was looking through the family picture album and came across this one:

IMG_5432

My Mother at a café near Florence in 1958.

We were there on vacation. We passed this café and stopped to look at the furniture. We could tell the chairs were Thonet. Turning them over we saw they were branded  Thonet and Made In Poland.

We couldn’t tell about the table. My Mother did the only reasonable thing and checked the table for markings. I could easily walk under the table but I couldn’t read so my use was limited.

Ever the lady, she even managed to keep her legs crossed at the ankles.

And, yes, she was wearing pearls.

(With apologies to Gianni Berengo Gardin and others)


Beyond perfection

Heartwood: Woodworking by Rob Porcaro - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 10:02pm
perfection?
Perfection. We might think we want it in our woodworking, yet it does not exist. But for the craftsperson, concern with perfection, far from being a benign wish, has a dark side – it can distract you from understanding excellence. Consider the example of a simple straight line, such as the straight edge on a […] 0
Categories: Hand Tools

Classic Orders – An Exercise

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 11:45am
Classic-Order-1

Fig. 2.4.1. The classic orders dominated pre-20th-century furniture-design books. Above is shown a Corinthian capital.


This is an excerpt from “By Hand and Eye”  by Geo. R. Walker and Jim Tolpin. 

The lifeblood of craft has always depended on knowledge passing from one generation to the next, and I struggle finding words to convey the importance that classic orders played. This is an opportunity to walk in the footsteps of thousands of artisans gone before you, a chance to learn things that cannot be put into words, because this leads into a room in your imagination. The classic orders aren’t about memorizing some nifty proportional recipes. In fact, it’s the furthest thing from recipes. It’s about learning to see. The physical act of drawing challenges the mind to reshuffle and see things anew. Try not to approach this like you’re learning a task or skill; instead just immerse yourself in this rite of passage. Have some fun with it, and let the ancients knock down the cobwebs and pry open some windows in some long-forgotten play space in your imagination.

Classic-Order-2

Fig. 2.4.2. You’ll need a sharp pencil, an eraser, several dividers, a straightedge and a couple fine-point markers to make your pencil lines permanent at the final step.

Grab a clean pine board about 8″ wide and 3′ long for a canvas. If (when) you botch the first attempt, simply plane or sand to reveal a new surface for another go. Pencil in all your lines then, after the entire drawing is complete, go back over your pencil lines with a marker. Think of it like a maze or a puzzle that will change the way you think and make new connections in your imagination. I encourage you, as always, to do this with pencil and not a computer to make sure you get the most direct connection between the portal of your hand and inner eye.

A word about scale. Because you will be drawing a relatively small image, some of the details will be too awkward to draw with a compass. For elements such as moulding profiles or the finer points on the capital, draw a separate detail sketch in larger format with a compass. Once you have completed the larger sketch, go back and hand sketch those details in. You’ll be pleasantly surprised by how well you can freehand sketch once you have the boundary of the form established and little practice on the larger detail drawings. This has real value in furniture design, also. For example, a volute is a delightful form to work into a design, yet because of scale, almost always requires drawing freehand. Generating a volute with a compass will inform your freehand attempts. Also because of scale, don’t attempt to use geometry to draw the entasis (slight convex bulging) on the upper two thirds of the column, just draw a straight taper.

In this drawing exercise you will render a Roman Doric order based on James Gibbs’ “Rules for Drawing the Several Parts of Architecture” (circa 1732). There are five orders – Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite – that exist in an almost endless number of versions and varieties to draw and explore.

Classic-Order-3

Fig. 2.4.3. The moulding at the top of this base is a proportional extension of the base below it. The half-circle indicates that it’sone-third of the base’s height. The quarter-arc shows the linkage between the height of the moulding and the projection of the base.

A few points about communicating proportions using arcs. One common way to show how a proportion relates to another element is to use a half-circle or quarter-circle to indicate a connection. Typically, a half-circle extends a mirror image proportion along the same line. Conversely, a quarter-circle mirrors a proportion from one element to an adjacent element but from horizontal to vertical (or vice versa).

Start by organizing the form (Doric order) into its major vertical parts: the beginning, middle and ending, better known as pedestal, column and entablature. Draw a vertical centerline and establish the top and bottom of your drawing with a pair of horizontal lines, leaving yourself a few inches of margin above and below. Use dividers to step off these major elements and indicate their boundaries with horizontal lines. Once you establish the height of the middle (column) you can determine the module. In the case of the Doric, divide the column height into eight equal parts. That’s the diameter of the shaft near the base and also, therefore, your module. Now – and this is important – draw a small module key in the space below your drawing. Many of the elements that follow will be simple divisions of the module, for example, the column-base height is a one-half module, so having this key handy will speed up the drawing process. To create a key, draw a horizontal line and mark off two modules end-to-end using vertical hash marks to highlight them. Then use your dividers and, through trial and error, step off one module into halves, quarters and eighths. Then step off the second module into thirds, sixths and 12ths.

Classic-Order-4

Fig. 2.4.4. On this Doric order the diameter of the column at the base is the module. That is, one eigth the overall height of the column. Once you find the module, step off a key with simple divisions of the module. You can then use the key to quickly reset your dividers as the drawing progresses.

Start with the largest divisions and work down to the smaller details. Once you have established the overall column height and diameter of the shaft at the base, there are a couple reference lines to pencil in. Note that the column height is divided into thirds and that the lower third’s shaft diameter remains constant while the upper two-thirds curve in gradually – an effect the Greeks called entasis. (As I mentioned earlier, however, at this scale you may want to just render the entasis as a slight taper rather than as a curve.) Also note the use of reference lines: One extends the outside diameter of the shaft above the column while a second extends the outside of the column base below into the pedestal. These lines allow you to step off the horizontal projection of elements in the pedestal and entablature.

Once you’ve established the overall vertical organization, draw in the details of the pedestal. Start by stepping off the vertical organization and then establish the horizontal projection for each part. Most are a function of the module or pulled from an adjacent proportion. Move up to the column and then the entablature.

For certain, you will take a wrong turn or two and have to backtrack and rethink it. It’s all part of learning to see proportionally. When your drawing is completed, you’ll not only have some studies to hang on the shop wall, but you’ll also have created an important mile marker on your journey to becoming an artisan designer.

Meghan Bates


Filed under: By Hand & Eye, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Pages

Subscribe to Norse Woodsmith aggregator - Hand Tools